May 26, 2019  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Tell the EPA to Follow Science on Air Quality
Action Alert - Wednesday, May 15, 2019 

As chair of the EPA’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee, Tony Cox—a former consultant for the American Petroleum Institute, the mining industry, and a tobacco company—is questioning if soot, causes premature death and other health issues. The science is clear that this type of pollution is very dangerous. ~ Sierra Club
Environmental Trivia Night, May 21
Event - Posted - Tuesday, May 14, 2019 

Maine Conservation Voters and the Immigrant Welcome Center are hosting an environmental-themed trivia night. At Maine Beer Company, Freeport, May 21, 6-7:30 pm.
How fish and wildlife are responding to climate change, May 20
Event - Posted - Monday, May 13, 2019 

This talk will explore phenological responses to seasonal climate drivers from the base of the food chain to higher trophic level species such as fish, seabirds and marine mammals. At Schoodic Institute, Winter Harbor, May 20, 7 pm.
Maine’s Tree City Celebration, May 20
Event - Posted - Monday, May 13, 2019 

The Maine Forest Service will present the 2019 Excellence in Community Forestry Award. At Camden Public Library, May 20, 1 pm. A tree will be planted in Harbor Park in honor of Earth Day.
Brunswick Town Commons 300th anniversary, May 19
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 12, 2019 

On May 19, 1719, the Pejepscot Proprietors voted to set aside 1,000 acres in Brunswick as a commonage, one of the first public lands established in Maine. It is an example of early community planning in the state and is habitat for rare pitch pine woodlands. In 2019, Brunswick celebrates the 300th anniversary of its Town Commons before, on, and after May 19.
Hike East & West Royce Mountains, May 19
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 12, 2019 

Hike to East Royce and West Royce mountains in Evans Notch, 6.2 miles round trip, May 19, pre-register. Sponsored by Appalachian Mountain Club.
International Migratory Bird Day, May 19
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 12, 2019 

The Augusta Bird Club will celebrate International Migratory Bird Day. At Arboretum, Augusta, May 19, 8 am.
Plogging in L/A, May 19
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 12, 2019 

Join others for a fun morning of blogging (picking up litter and walking/jogging) in Lewiston/Auburn. At Baxter Brewing, Lewiston, May 19, 10:45 am - noon, followed by the documentary "Plastic Ocean" and a talk about reducing plastics in Maine. Sponsored by Natural Resources Council of Maine, Baxter Brewing, and Lamey Wellehan.
Historic preservation, energy efficiency grant proposals sought
Announcement - Saturday, May 11, 2019 

The Maine Community Foundation is seeking grant proposals for its Belvedere Historic Preservation and Energy Efficiency program, which invests in the preservation, restoration, and retrofitting of historic buildings in Maine. Grant awards of up to $20,000 are available for the preservation and reuse of historic buildings that serve as civic, cultural or economic hubs for Maine communities. Application deadline: June 1.
The Balance of Nature:, May 18
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 11, 2019 

Chewonki's one hour nature program for kids 8+ and adults includes a slide presentation, nature table, mounted coyote and several live animals. At Grange Hall, Norridgewock, May 18, 1 pm.
Spring bird walk, May 18
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 11, 2019 

Learn to identify the birds you see and hear in your yard, field or woodlot. Brush up on your spring bird ID. At Old County Road South, Dixmont, May 18, 7:30 am. Sponsored by Dixmont Conservation Commission.
Used outdoor gear sale, May 18
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 11, 2019 

More than 40 sellers will offer deals on nearly- new and lovingly-used outdoor equipment. At Mount Desert Island High School, May 18, 10 am - 2 pm. Sponsored by Friends of Acadia.
Hands Across the Sand, May 18
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 11, 2019 

A 15-minute gathering of people lined up, hand-in-hand, in a silent expression of agreement about the need to reduce and prevent petroleum-related pollution, followed by a one-hour cleanup of area beaches. At Mother’s Beach, Kennebunk, 2:30 - 4 pm.
Cliff Walk, Prouts Neck, May 18
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 11, 2019 

Evening walk along the shore where Winslow Homer lived and painted to see the full moon rise over the Atlantic Ocean. At Scarborough, May 18, pre-register. Sponsored by Appalachian Mountain Club.
Understanding Bird Behavior, May 18
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 11, 2019 

Nat Wheelwright, Bowdoin College Biology Professor Emeritus, will lead a two-hour field trip. At Curtis Farm Preserve, Harpswell, May 18, 8:30 am, pre-register. Sponsored by Harpswell Heritage Land Trust.
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News Items
‘Conditions are ripe’ for punishing tick season in Maine
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, May 26, 2019 

Ticks have begun to emerge in the woods and fields after a rainy spring, and as the weather warms and sunny days unfold, Mainers and the tourists who begin arriving this Memorial Day weekend are facing another onslaught of Lyme disease and other tick-borne afflictions. The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention has already reported 146 Lyme cases through May 23. So far, 41 percent of the 400 deer ticks sent to the University of Maine’s tick lab have tested positive for Lyme, with 8 percent carrying anaplasmosis, another tick-borne disease.
More millennials are birding, around the country and in Maine
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, May 26, 2019 

Since National Audubon began tracking its demographics more closely, it has seen an uptick in the number of members in their 20s and 30s, from 9 percent of their 1 million members in 2017 to 12 percent of the organization’s 1.4 million membership this year. Maine Audubon staff naturalist Doug Hitchcox, 30, said it’s not unusual to go on a guided bird walk these days and see millennial birders – a stark change from a decade ago when he started birding. “I’m seeing more millennial mothers with children coming on free bird walks,” said Bob Duchesne, founder of the Maine Birding Trail. Maine millennials give a variety of reasons they like to bird, chief among them a desire for a deeper connection to nature.
Column: It takes a lot of fuel to complete a migration
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, May 26, 2019 

Spring migration is a wonderful event. We marvel at the sudden appearance of birds, dressed in their breeding finery with males singing lustily. The spring migration lifts our spirits. Understanding the physiological demands of migration makes the spring migration even more astounding. Meeting energy demands is more difficult for birds, particularly small birds, than for any other animals. ~ Herb Wilson
Column: Turkey season is not a sprint
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, May 26, 2019 

The birds were hammering from the roost before dawn and continued gobbling even after fly-down. We shared vocal volleys with two vociferous toms for a lengthy duration but just couldn’t coax them close enough to seal the deal. By the time they finally quit, the air was noticeably warmer and most of the other bird species had also ceased their morning chorus. And we were spent. I glanced at my watch and was stunned to read the time, 7 a.m. It felt like we’d spent an entire morning battling birds but it had only been a couple hours. The action was over but most of the day still lay ahead. That’s kind of what the whole turkey season is like. ~ Bob Humphrey
Letter: Direct defense funds toward alternative energy instead
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, May 26, 2019 

Why are there no companies from the U.S. listed as leaders in wind industry manufacturing? Know this: We have a deeply rooted congressional commitment to use our tax dollars to support a military-industrial complex. Most congressional districts in the country are beholden to the jobs that build the financially profitable infrastructure for endless war. Studies such as “Costs of War” show that tax dollars spent on building an alternative-energy infrastructure create far more jobs than military production. The most important security threat in the world is the climate crisis. Let’s change our priorities and pay BIW employees to convert their shipyard to start production of wind energy systems, light rail, tidal power and other renewable-energy products. ~ Mary Beth Sullivan, Brunswick
Forest rangers warn campers of risks of out-of-state firewood
WCSH-TV6 - Saturday, May 25, 2019 

With the start of the 2019 camping season this weekend, Maine Forest Rangers from the Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry have an important message they want you to know. Maine Forest Rangers will be going to various campgrounds throughout Maine this summer talking with campers about the risks of transporting out-of-state firewood. They are hoping to be able to gauge and raise awareness about the dangers untreated firewood pose to Maine forests. They are interested in just how much the public knows about the threat of invasive insects.
From family-friendly trails to challenging climbs, these Maine hiking hotspots are worth the trek
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, May 25, 2019 

Certain areas of Maine are hiking hotspots, places where you can easily plan out several days of wilderness walking. In these locations, you can find family-friendly treks to waterfalls and remote ponds, and you can also tackle more challenging climbs over rugged terrain to bald peaks and abandoned fire towers. A little insider knowledge and extra planning can help you embrace these beautiful and popular hiking destinations with success.
Opinion: Wayne residents should vote for conservation
Kennebec Journal - Saturday, May 25, 2019 

The town of Wayne has a unique opportunity to provide for the protection and use of a tract of land that currently contributes significantly to its open space goal, at little cost to the town. This unique tract provides a major contribution to Wayne open spaces. To sell or otherwise fragment this land would jeopardize the linkage it provides to other lands, and degrade its significant natural values, including its diverse wildlife habitats, and recreational potentials. I urge Wayne voters to vote for long-term conservation on June 11. ~ Fred Hurley
Letter: Forest conservation contributes to Moosehead region’s progress
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, May 25, 2019 

Last week volunteers helped clear the treadway for a new trail north of Greenville. It’s just one of many new and improved trails that partners have completed in the area since 2012. Conserved forests are an essential part of these initiatives. Forests give us so much: Good jobs. Great communities. A glimpse into the past. A place for fish and wildlife to thrive. The chance to explore. As a land trust for Maine’s North Woods, the Forest Society of Maine is committed to sustaining these values. As Maine moves forward, let’s remember the Moosehead Lake region and its progress. At the edge of Maine’s largest lake, land conservation has laid the framework for a better future. ~ Karin Tilberg, Forest Society of Maine, Bangor
Letter: Further city waterfront restrictions won’t benefit fishermen
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, May 25, 2019 

Having fished commercially for over 30 years, I fear the mistake Portland’s about to make, approving damaging zoning on the waterfront. The culprit is policy that has systematically decimated smaller fishermen. Thanks to severe federal and state restrictions, climate change and short-sighted decisions to reward those who catch the most fish, commercial groundfishing is now corporate. Lobstering is next on the hit list. Politicians don’t like difficulty. Their zoning “solution” creates no new berthing for fishermen. It punishes others, and cuts tax revenue for infrastructure upgrades on the working waterfront. You hurt fishermen by slowing Portland’s economic engine. The answer is collaboration, not confrontation. ~ Craig A. Pendleton, Old Orchard Beach
Collins Introduces Legislation for Prevention and Treatment of Tick-Borne Illnesses
Maine Public - Friday, May 24, 2019 

U.S. Sen. Susan Collins has introduced legislation that would authorize $100 million for the prevention and treatment of tick-borne illnesses. She says Lyme disease and other illnesses are expanding to more areas of the country and she wants the federal government to step up its efforts in a number of areas, like: “data collection and analysis, support early detection and diagnosis, improve treatment and heighten public awareness.” Collins’ measure would authorize $20 million per year to states, create a national oversight office to coordinate efforts, and authorize $10 million per year for five years for regional centers to study Lyme and other tick-borne diseases.
80 animals seized from Corinna farm
Bangor Daily News - Friday, May 24, 2019 

Eighty animals were seized Friday from a Corinna farm by the Animal Welfare Division of the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry. The owner of the animals was hospitalized and unable to care for them.
Students From 1,600 Cities Just Walked Out of School to Protest Climate Change
TIME - Friday, May 24, 2019 

Hundreds of thousands of students around the world walked out of their schools and colleges Friday in the latest in a series of strikes urging action to address the climate crisis. According to event organizers Fridays for Future, over 1664 cities across 125 countries registered strike actions, with more expected to report turnouts in the coming days.
Mills Criticizes Trump Administration's Aggressive Implementation of Tariffs
Maine Public - Friday, May 24, 2019 

With trade tensions escalating between the United States and China and a growing economic toll on Maine businesses — particularly lobster dealers — Gov. Janet Mills is emphasizing international trade as a vital part of the state's future. Mills said that as many as 4400 jobs in Maine have been put at risk by the tariffs. She called on Maine's business community to invest in new partnerships and innovations that would move the state forward. Those could include a more formal trade arrangement with Finland where government and the private sector have succeeded in finding new markets for the country's traditional wood products industries.
Maine Natural Gas Company Wants To Turn Cow Manure Into Renewable Energy
Maine Public - Friday, May 24, 2019 

Summit Utilities, which operates Summit Natural Gas of Maine, is building what is called a "Dairy Digester" in the Kennebec County town of Clinton. The company is investing about $20 million into the project. When it is finished, it will take waste manure form several dairy farms in the area, break it down in a system that resembles an enormous, airless compost bin, and then inject the gas that is one of the products of the process into Maine's grid to use for home heating.
Brunswick students learn what it takes to go ‘From Mud to Table’
Times Record - Friday, May 24, 2019 

“From Mud to Table” ­— that’s the title of an Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) project being conducted by two Brunswick High School Seniors. The muddy part involves the invasive green crab population that likes to munch on valuable soft shell clams. And the table part is figuring out ways to eat them. The many steps in between are not without their challenges, but there are some innovative solutions in the works. This is what Ariana Edwards and Chloe Kilborn are documenting through a series of photographs and interviews.
Freeport brewery launches push to put more clean energy into its beer
Times Record - Friday, May 24, 2019 

Beer is more than just a mixture of water, grain, hops and yeast. Brewers know that each batch needs energy — the electricity to power the brewing system, to control the climate to heat the water, to bottle the beer, to refrigerate the finished product, to transport it where it needs to go. Behind every bottle of beer is a substantial carbon footprint — something that Maine Beer Company says it wants to reduce. The company launched a new clean energy initiative on Thursday to help increase renewable energy in the community and across the state.
Final design of Maine bicentennial flag unveiled
Maine Government News - Friday, May 24, 2019 

Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap today finalized the design of the Maine bicentennial commemorative flag, to be on display statewide through 2020. The flag is comprised of a field of blue representing the sky; lighter blue across the bottom representing water, be that river, pond or ocean; and a pine tree moved off center to make the viewer feel like they are inside the forest, looking out.
One of the largest environmental protests ever is underway. It’s led by children.
Other - Friday, May 24, 2019 

A massive global youth-led protest demanding political action on climate change is underway Friday, with 2,300 school strikes planned in 150 countries. In previous strikes, youth have managed to shame some governments into action on climate change, but students around the world are skipping school today to demand even more. And activists are hoping it will be the largest demonstration for environmental action in history. The demands are clear: more aggressive targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions to keep warming in check, with budgets and legal force to back them.
TPL scores Portland on parks
Trust for Public Land - Friday, May 24, 2019 

The Trust for Public Land has built a comprehensive database of local parks in the nearly 14,000 cities, towns and communities. According to TPL's ParkScore index, Portland, Maine:
• Has 105 parks
• 88% of residents live within a 10 minute walk of a park
• 8,692 people live outside a 10-minute walk to a park
• 7% of Portland's city land is used for parks and recreation
Maine’s one-stop shop for outdoors adventure gets an upgrade
Down East - Friday, May 24, 2019 

Stephen Engle, director of the Center for Community GIS, a Farmington-based company that provides digital mapping services, figured the web was the only medium that could hold a clearinghouse of trail info for hikers, mountain bikers, and paddlers. So, in 2010, CCGIS launched Maine Trail Finder, at first featuring a few dozen trails, mostly in Franklin County. Since then, the site’s coverage has grown to span the whole state. This spring, he and his team rolled out a sleek new look for the site.
‘Riverwalk: Swimming Upstream’ banners on display in Gardiner
Kennebec Journal - Friday, May 24, 2019 

Volunteers from Upstream recently installed 26 art banners designed to record and celebrate the restoration of the stream and Kennebec River as told by the people who made it happen. This exhibit also kicks off the celebration of 20th anniversary of the removal of Edwards Dam in Augusta and the revitalization of the Kennebec River.
Outdoorsmen can be jerks. What hunting, fishing and hiking behaviors tick you off?
Bangor Daily News - Friday, May 24, 2019 

Outdoorsmen (and women, for that matter) can be jerks. What kind of hunting, fishing or hiking behaviors tick you off? How much is too much? What kinds of things can we do to make our outdoor pursuits more civil?
Letter: Editorial fails to recognize evolution in how we see animals
Portland Press Herald - Friday, May 24, 2019 

The Portland Press Herald’s May 16 editorial, while attempting to poke holes in the rights of animals by questioning whether or not a dog had legal standing in court, trivialized the very real problems society faces in protecting the welfare of animals. Regardless, if one believes animals should have rights or standing in a court of law, they nonetheless deserve respect and protection from those who would do them harm. As society evolves to recognize others’ rights, as it has with women and minorities, so has the language. Animals have always deserved the same, and now the time has come. ~ Don Kimball, South Portland
York lobster dealer wins national exporter award
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, May 23, 2019 

A York lobster dealer has won a presidential award for contributing to American export growth. Maine Coast earned the 2019 President’s “E” Award for showing sustained growth over four years, but the administration’s escalating trade war with China has slowed that expansion. The company has made its mark selling lobster to China’s growing middle class. In February, in the days leading up to Chinese New Year, which used to be Maine Coast’s busiest time of year, company owner Tom Adams said that the U.S.-China trade war had cost him 90 percent of his China business.
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