June 19, 2019  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Maine Environmental News
Action Alert - Wednesday, June 19, 2019 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond; hey, we're all connected). We have posted summaries and links to 60,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Save Right Whales
Action Alert - Wednesday, June 19, 2019 

New England’s iconic whale is on the brink of extinction. A bill in Congress called Scientific Assistance for Very Endangered (“SAVE”) Right Whales could help this key species recover. ~ Conservation Law Foundation
Water: What is has to teach us, Jun 25
Event - Posted - Tuesday, June 18, 2019 

Learn about fresh water ecosystems and new aquaculture operations in the MidCoast region. At Topsham Public Library, June 25, 6 pm. Sponsored by Cathance River Education Alliance.
Proposed Coyote Center, Jun 24
Event - Posted - Monday, June 17, 2019 

Biologist Geri Vistein will share an informative film about the future Coyote Center in Maine, followed by a discussion of Maine’s coyotes. At Lithgow Public Library, Augusta, June 24, 6:30 pm.
Teen Wilderness Expedition, July 23-25
Announcement - Sunday, June 16, 2019 

The Teen Wilderness Expedition is a 3-day, 2-night, all-inclusive adventure for 12-16 year olds at Little Lyford Lodge, July 23-25. Offered by Piscataquis County Soil and Water Conservation District and Appalachian Mountain Club.
Maine State Museum hosts Bike Day, Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

Join the Maine State Museum, Bicycle Coalition of Maine and the Maine State Library in a free family event to commemorate the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote and learn about the benefits of safe, relaxed bike riding. At Maine State Museum, June 22, 10 am - 1 pm.
Woodland Management with Birds in Mind, Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

A Forestry for Maine Birds workshop for landowners, foresters and loggers interested in learning how they can support Maine’s forest songbirds. At Somerset County Cooperative Extension office, Skowhegan, and on the adjacent Yankee Woodlot Demonstration Forest, June 22, 9 am - noon.
Hike Puzzle Mt., Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

A moderate to strenuous hike of 8.5 miles. Cross several exposed granite boulders and ledges offering views of the Sunday River ski area, Grafton Notch, and the Presidentials, June 22, pre-register. Sponsored by Appalachian Mountain Club.
Androscoggin River Canoe & Kayak River Race, Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

This event is open to all to launch canoes, kayaks, paddle boards, (and more) into the Androscoggin River and complete one of three courses of varying length and challenge. At Festival Plaza, Auburn, June 22, 9 am, $15 for single paddler, $25 for a double, benefits Androscoggin Land Trust.
Plants of Corea Heath, Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

Join Jill Weber, botanist and co-author of The Plants of Acadia National Park, to learn about carnivorous plants, orchids, stunted trees and shrubs and cotton-grass. At Corea Heath, Goldsboro, June 22, 8:30 am. Sponsored by Downeast Audubon.
Maine Wildlife Park open house, Jun 21
Event - Posted - Friday, June 14, 2019 

The Maine Wildlife Park in Gray will hold an open house with free admission, June 21, 5-8 pm. Feeding times for moose, lynx, foxes, cougars, vultures and bears will be posted.
Call for a presidential primary debate on climate change
Action Alert - Thursday, June 13, 2019 

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez has rejected a presidential primary debate on climate change. 15 Democratic presidential candidates have joined the call. So can you. ~ CREDO Action
Trekking through Time
Announcement - Thursday, June 13, 2019 

From June through October, Lakes Environmental Association, Loon Echo Land Trust, Greater Lovell Land Trust, Upper Saco Valley Land Trust, and Western Foothills Land Trust will host the Trekking through Time Series. Once a month throughout the summer and early fall, each organization will host a historical tour of one of its conservation properties.
Help document impact on shell middens, Jun 18
Announcement - Tuesday, June 11, 2019 

Many cultural artifacts of Maine's first coastal residents are preserved in shell middens, but these sites are disappearing as sea levels rise, collectors dig into the middens, and visitors walk on them. Maine Midden Minders is developing a database of erosion conditions at middens. Volunteer training at Coastal Rivers’ Education Center, Damariscotta, June 18, 3-7 pm.
“Dog-Friendly Hikes in Maine” book launch, Jun 18
Event - Posted - Tuesday, June 11, 2019 

Book signing and presentation for “Dog-Friendly Hikes in Maine” by Aislinn Sarnacki, which contains detailed descriptions and maps of 35 hikes across Maine that are ideal for dogs and their owners. At Epic Sports, Bangor, June 18, 5-7:30 pm.
Current  Archive      Page: 1 2 3 4


 
People Online People Online:
Visitors Visitors: 150
Members Members: 0
Total Total: 150


Visitors since 2/7/12 Minimize

   You are here:  Home    
We Need You! Minimize
Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, 
a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. 
This is the most comprehensive online source 
available for links to Maine conservation and 
natural resource news stories and events. 
If eveyone who visits this website donates 
$25 (or more) a year we can 
keep this service going.

Donate Button with Credit Cards

 Jym St. Pierre, Editor 
Maine Environmental News is provided 
as a service of RESTORE: The North Woods

News Items
Once a nuisance, now toxic algae is a severe nationwide threat
Associated Press - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

The scourge is escalating, overwhelming government efforts to curb a leading cause: fertilizer runoff from farms. Instead of ordering agriculture to stem the flood of nutrients, regulators seek voluntary cooperation, an approach not afforded other big polluters. Government agencies have spent billions of dollars and produced countless studies on the problem. But an investigation found little to show for their efforts.
UPDATED: Maine Governor Wannabes
Maine Environmental News - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Maine’s next gubernatorial election is set for November 6, 2018. It will be the first in the state’s history to be conducted by ranked choice voting, unless that is declared unconstitutional by the state’s Supreme Judicial Court. According to information from various, mostly reliable, sources as of November 16, 2017, there are 11 declared Democratic candidates, 5 declared Republican candidates, and 7 other gubernatorial wannabes. Plus a gaggle of possibles in the wings. Here is the updated list. Repairing the damage done by the LePage Administration to Maine’s land, water, air and wildlife safety net will be a major job for the next governor. Will we find out the policies of each of these candidates?
Blog: A green industry is brewing in Maine
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

My experiences in the outdoors as a child led to a deep passion for nature, which I’m thankful to say, has carried on into my adult life. I am proud to be an advocate for the natural world, and even prouder to advocate for people and businesses that also work to be stewards of nature. Maine’s craft beer industry is a great example of the free market creating outstanding products while promoting greener practices. ~ Ben Wyman
Watchdog slams Zinke for failing to document travel
POLITICO - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke failed to properly document his travel, the agency's watchdog said Thursday, preventing it from determining whether he had violated government rules. "Our investigation is delayed by absent or incomplete documentation for several pertinent trips and a review process that failed to include proper documentation and accountability," Deputy Inspector General Mary Kendall said in a letter obtained by POLITICO and first reported by The Washington Post.
Former employee charged with setting fire at Lincoln mill
Associated Press - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Officials say David Parsons, of Lincoln, a former worker at the the former Lincoln paper mill, was charged Thursday with three counts of arson. More than a dozen fire departments were called in to help douse the fire that started Wednesday afternoon and destroyed a 300-foot-long warehouse and a scale shed. The fire raised concerns about toxins on the site. Lincoln officials voted to seek a Superfund designation for the site that’s contaminated with cancer-causing asbestos, dioxin, heavy metals and PCBs. Arson carries a sentence of up to 30 years in prison.
Scarborough officials may raise beach parking fees, plan to sell public safety building
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Some beachgoers could see higher parking fees next year at Ferry, Higgins and Pine Point beaches. Town councilors passed the first reading of proposed parking fees for 2018 summer beach parking on Wednesday evening and scheduled a public hearing on the fees for Dec. 6. The proposed fees for resident season passes for beach parking will remain the same at $40, but nonresident passes could double from $75 to $150. Parking for resident seniors and veterans will still be free. Daily parking passes could climb from $10 to $15 at the three beaches. A 5:30-9 a.m. parking fee could also be added for $5. Hourly meters will remain at $1 at Ferry and Higgins beaches.
Fire at Lincoln mill fuels concerns about asbestos, other toxins
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

State environmental safety workers will do air tests after two buildings were destroyed by a fire at the former Lincoln paper mill that police said was intentionally set. The tests set for Saturday will determine the level of threat posed by cancer-causing pollutants found at the former Lincoln Paper and Tissue LLC mill. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Maine Department of Environmental Protection workers will tour the site on Friday, DEP spokesman David Madore said Thursday.
Column: It’s time to rent a birder for a day
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

The Penobscot Valley Chapter of Maine Audubon conducts an annual online auction, and one of this year’s auction items is me. The highest bidder wins a morning walk anywhere in Maine to identify all the birds making noise. Bidding will continue until Dec. 8. Then we party. ~ Bob Duchesne
Clinton Townsend’s Memoir is Amazing
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

The title of Clinton Townsend’s memoir is both ironic and wrong. The book is titled Trouble Maker, and Bill was not that. He was one of our state’s greatest conservationists and an inspiration to many, including me. But I get the title. Bill was certainly an environmental agitator, pushing us forward on my important issues and projects. From the protection of Bigelow Mountain to the creation of the Land-use Regulation Commission, and from his advocacy for the Allagash River to his participation in the Land for Maine’s Future program, we all owe Bill so much for all that he did. He was given many awards for his wonderful work.
Opinion: Maine lobstermen know the need for clean air, water
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Maine’s lobster industry, realizing we are dependent on a healthy ocean as well as an abundance of lobsters, has a long established heritage of conservation and has made choices over time that helped create a fishery that is flourishing while others are not. Our good management decisions could well be an example to decision-makers who mistakenly believe that momentary gain from relaxation of environmental regulations somehow benefits us in the long run. Working in the natural world, fishermen realize that a healthy environment and its resources feed our economy. What we need is a government that looks to our environmental, economic and physical well-being. ~ Richard Nelson, member of the Maine Ocean Acidification Commission and the Maine Regional Ocean Planning Advisory Group, Friendship
Nine Days in Baxter
Free Press - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

In early August, I attended the Maine Youth Wilderness Leadership Program, a flagship program for youth designed to cultivate and inspire the next generation of Maine’s environmental leaders. Friends of Baxter State Park has offered this program annually since 2009. The program includes a nine-day wilderness experience in Baxter State Park. It was an adventure I will never forget and will carry with me on my future visits to the park. If you are a teenager in Maine I encourage you to apply. It was an amazing time in a wonderful place with great, like-minded people. ~ Fyn Kynd, Searsmont
Passenger Rail Service from Rockland to Boston Could Return in May
Free Press - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

It’s been nearly 60 years since a passenger train ran from Rockland to Boston, but the Amtrak Downeaster is tentatively scheduled to restart the service in May, according to the Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority (NNEPRA). The authority, which manages operation of the Downeaster, says its proposed midcoast connection would be a seasonal pilot project to see if there is enough demand for the service. The train would operate on weekends from May to October with stops in Bath, Wiscasset, Newcastle, and Rockland.
A dead moose in a Subaru and other scenes from a Maine moose hunt
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

A Subaru Brat climbing Scammon Ridge didn’t fare well when it caught fire after overheating. Firefighters attributed the blaze to its cargo — a heavy bull moose, which, according to a firefighter, exceeded the Subaru’s maximum recommended weight limit. A flatbed from Guilford transported the charred mess to the Texaco Station in Greenville, where Warden Pat Dorion and I met the hunter. While the warden interviewed the man, I was dumbstruck by the blackened moose: Its hind end sat in the bed of the Subaru, the torso draped the roof, and the neck and antlered head covered most of the windshield and hood. ~ Ron Joseph
Labor shortage challenges Maine ski resorts to be creative as season opens
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Every year, Maine’s ski industry more than triples its workforce in only a few months, hiring armies of snowmakers, lift attendants and front office representatives, as well as servers, cooks, housekeepers and retail salespeople. In the winter, the Sunday River and Sugarloaf ski resorts become the biggest employers in rural Oxford and Franklin counties, respectively. Collectively, Maine’s ski resorts added $300 million to the Maine economy, according to a 2015 Maine Development Foundation tourism report. But as Maine’s labor market has tightened, ski resorts have found it harder to fill positions.
Yarmouth aims to close deal on 24-acre Royal River preserve project
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Town officials and the Royal River Conservation Trust hope to raise $45,000 in private donations by year's end, building on $220,000 earmarked by Yarmouth and the Land for Maine's Future program. The Yarmouth Riverfront Woods Preserve was one of 15 projects slated to receive a slice of $3.2 million in funding that the Land for Maine’s Future board allocated last week.
Opinion: A critical fishery left vulnerable to one company’s exploitation
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission voted in 2012 to end overfishing of Atlantic menhaden and set coastwide catch limits for the first time. Unfortunately, despite vast consensus to manage the fishery in a sustainable way by leaving more fish in the sea, the commissioners decided Monday to keep the catch limits for Atlantic menhaden the same. They rejected an proposal, supported by 126,000 public comments, to set ecosystem-based management guidelines that would have ensured an abundance of food for the many species known to feed on menhaden. ~ Stephen W. Kress, director, National Audubon Society’s Seabird Restoration Program, Bremen
Opinion: Solution to rockweed harvesting should be rooted in privacy rights
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

This week, the Maine Supreme Court heard oral arguments over whether rockweed can be harvested from private property without owners’ consent, raising fears of overharvesting and other ecological harms. Due to legal ambiguities that stretch back to the colonial era, no one is quite sure who owns the seaweed that grows on rocks in the area between low and high tide. But there’s a proven way to protect a valuable environmental resource like Maine’s rockweed while also reducing conflict: Define it as private property. If landowners have clear rights to the rockweed growing along their shorelines, then they will have the ability to preserve it and incentive to ensure that any harvesting is sustainable. ~ Jonathan Wood and Tate Watkins, Property and Environment Research Center
Letter: Keep cats indoors
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Indoor cats live longer. Indoor cats are exposed to fewer diseases. And — very importantly — indoor cats kill no birds — no yellow warblers, no robins, no baby birds or others. Outdoor cats are responsible for killing approximately 2 billion songbirds a year. There are more than 74 million pet cats in the United States, with only about a third of them kept safe indoors. The rest are roaming about, and it is estimated that each one kills up to three dozen birds a year. ~ Sue Shaw, Penobscot
Maine Mini Adventure: Mill about Millinocket
Portland Press Herald - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 

The adventure I had set out on was to climb Mount Katahdin. I was making good time when, 58 miles north of Bangor, the engine was blown — and so was my hiking trip. After renting a car and finding the friend I was supposed to meet, we instead waited for news from the mechanic and spent the day bopping around the former mill town. Millinocket was home to the Great Northern Paper Company, which employed more than 4,000 in its heyday in the ’60s and ’70s. But as the industry declined, the work dried up. While the median age continues to rise, those who have stayed make it a place worth visiting. Millinocket is a great base for outdoor activity. It’s adjacent to the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, right by the fly-fishing mecca that is East Branch Penobscot River, and the nearest town to Baxter State Park with its Instagram-worthy Mount Katahdin. ~ Paul Pedersen
Four businesses to be honored for expanding Portland’s ‘economic vitality’
Mainebiz - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 

Portland Development Corp. and the city of Portland will recognize Eimskip, Bristol Seafood, Think Tank Coworking and Fork Food Lab at a Nov. 30 awards ceremony for their roles in expanding the city's economy. Eimskip, the Icelandic shipping company that announced in 2013 it was moving its U.S. port of call from Norfolk, Va., to Portland, will receive the "2017 Economic Development Achievement" award. Since coming to Portland, Eimskip has seen 20% traffic growth each year. It plans to start weekly shipping on Dec. 1.
Moose battle caught on video highlights man’s trip through the Maine outdoors
Bangor Daily News - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 

“There was a small area of water along the road on one side. As I came to the intersection, and looked down one of the roads, there were two young bull moose....They began to engage in some light antler-to-antler engagement. It didn’t appear at that moment to be real aggressive fight. This interaction went on for about 15 minutes as they would circle one another, walk away, re-engage. As it went on they got more aggressive to the point you knew they were battling to see who was the better. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing.”
Massive fire burns former Lincoln paper mill
Bangor Daily News - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 

Flames several stories high destroyed one large building and heavily damaged at least one more at the former Lincoln paper mill on Wednesday. Firefighters from 11 departments knocked down most of the flames as of 8 p.m., almost three hours after Lincoln’s firefighters responded to a fire at the scale shed at 50 Katahdin Ave. Firefighters had finished knocking down that blaze on the eastern side of the 387-acre Lincoln Paper and Tissue LLC site.
Poliquin touts bill that would allow worm, clam harvesting at Acadia National Park
Bangor Daily News - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 

A federal committee is weighing a bill that would make Acadia National Park just the fourth park in the nation to allow commercial harvesting by giving diggers the all-clear to toil in mudflats in and around the park. During a hearing Wednesday before the House Committee on Natural Resources, Rep. Bruce Poliquin, R- Maine, presented HR 4266, a bill designed to resolve border disputes between the park and surrounding communities. It also includes language aimed at clearing up confusion among marine worm and clam diggers who use tidal mudflats around the park and park rangers who tried to stop them
Brunswick a finalist for national downtown revitalization award
Forecaster - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 

The Brunswick Downtown Association has made it to the final round of contenders for The Great American Main Street Award. Municipalities across the country apply for the honor, given by the Main Street America organization each year. It rewards a community’s efforts to revitalize its commercial district. Debora King, executive director of the BDA, said the organization is very excited about making it so far into the process, which began with an application in June. King said that in addition to The Great American Main Street Award, the BDA is also in the running for two other honors from Main Street America.
Blazing Ahead: Benton MacKaye, Myron Avery, and the Rivalry That Built the Appalachian Trail
Appalachian Mountain Club - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 

A new book, "Blazing Ahead," Jeffrey H. Ryan traces the rivalry of Benton MacKaye and Myron Avery, key founders of the Appalachian Trail. Here is an excerpt.
Current  Archive      Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...


 
Midcoast Maine farms
donate greens to
feed asylum seekers

Photo: Darcie Moore / The Time Record




News Feeds

MainePages.com
Copyright © 2009-2019 Maine Environmental News
Terms Of Use Privacy Statement
Home|About|Links|Submit Content|Search|Contact