August 24, 2019  
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Maine Environmental News
Action Alert - Friday, August 23, 2019 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond; hey, we're all connected). We have posted summaries and links to 60,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Rangeley Outdoor Film Festival, Aug 30
Event - Posted - Friday, August 23, 2019 

The Rangeley Trail Town Festival features a variety of short films about the outdoors. At RFA Lakeside Theater, Rangeley, August 30, 7 pm, $6 for adults, $3 for Appalachian Trail hikers and children under 12.
LightHawk Paper Plane Contest
Announcement - Thursday, August 22, 2019 

Enter your best paper airplane design for a chance to have it mailed to thousands in LightHawk's 2019 Holiday Letter. Deadline: October 18, 2019.
BTLT Seeks Community Input on Future Conservation
Announcement - Tuesday, August 20, 2019 

The Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust is seeking community input on its current and future conservation work in Brunswick, Topsham, and Bowdoin. A community survey is available online until September 2.
Butler to speak on conservation, Aug 27
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 20, 2019 

Conservationist Gil Butler will discuss his efforts to establish outdoor education programs and conservation projects in Maine and throughout North and South America. At College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, August 27, 9 am, free, parking on campus is by permit only.
Solo Paddle of Northern Forest Canoe Trail, Aug 27
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 20, 2019 

Laurie Apgar Chandler will read from and discuss her book “Upwards,” which tells her story as the first woman to solo paddle New England’s 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail. At Bailey Library, Winthrop, August 27, 6:30 pm.
Keeping Acadia Healthy With New Science, Aug 26
Event - Posted - Monday, August 19, 2019 

Abraham Miller-Rushing and Rebecca Cole-Will will discuss how Acadia National Park is facing a triple environmental challenge: global warming, acid rain, and increased visitation. At Bar Harbor, August 26, 5 pm.
Maine’s Seaweed Scene, Sep 26
Event - Posted - Monday, August 19, 2019 

Susan Hand Shetterly and Robin Hadlock Seeley will discuss the importance of protected wild habitats and the critical role of seaweed in the Gulf of Maine. At Moore Community Center, Ellsworth, September 26, 7 pm. Hosted by Downeast Audubon.
Bee apocalypse
Action Alert - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

U.S. agriculture today is 48 times more toxic to honeybees than it was 25 years ago—almost entirely because of neonicotinoid pesticides. It's part of an "insect apocalypse." But instead of taking action, the Trump administration is shredding protections for bees. Will you stand with me in the fight to save the bees? ~ Mayor Ethan Strimling, Portland, Maine
Maine Farmland Trust Gallery 20th Anniversary Retrospective Exhibit, thru Oct 11
Announcement - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

To celebrate Maine Farmland Trust’s 20th anniversary, a curated retrospective featuring a selection of works that have been exhibited at the MFT Gallery over the past 10 years is on view through October 11.
National Parks Free Entrance, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

All National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer free admission to everyone to celebrate the National Park Service's 103rd birthday on August 25.
Brechlin reading, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

Earl Brechlin, a Registered Maine Guide, will read from his book, "Return to Moose River: In Search of the Spirit of the Great North Woods," essays describing white-water canoeing, snowmobiling, and backpacking adventures in many parts of Maine. At Albert Church Brown Memorial Library, China, August 25, 2 pm.
Kennebec Land Trust annual meeting, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

At Camp Androscoggin, Wayne, August 25. The trust has conserved more than 6,300 acres and constructed 44 miles of trails on KLT protected lands.
Maine Herpetological Society Reptile Expo, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 17, 2019 

50+ vendors, 1,000+ reptiles, plus Mr. Drew and His Animals Too. At Ramada Inn, Lewiston, August 25, 10 am - 4 pm, $7, kids under 12 free.
Families in the Outdoors, Aug 24
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 17, 2019 

Learn about all kinds of Maine bugs – the good, the bad and the very strange looking. At Law Farm, Dover-Foxcroft, August 24, 9 am - noon.
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News Items
Column: It’s not what you say, it’s what you mean
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Deer hunters have terms unique to their avocation. But terms and phrases instantly recognizable to fellow enthusiasts can be confusing to non-hunters, and occasionally even hunters. Let’s take still-hunting, for example. The word “still” seems to imply being motionless and quiet. But still-hunting actually refers to a hunter moving slowly, stopping frequently to look and listen. Hunters should be mindful of who might be within earshot lest you should rub them the wrong way, which could get you into a real scrape. ~ Bob Humphrey
Column: Scarborough provides perfect spot for November outing
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

There are always a few days in November that provide some of the best paddling outings of the year. Bold blue sky, crystal clear water, enough fall colors left to keep your camera busy, that special feeling of a face alive and pulsating from the caress of a light breeze, and a body kept warm and toasty by the low-angled sun, and your trusty fleece and windbreaker. We recently headed to Scarborough’s winding Nonesuch River for three hours of exploring just inland from the open ocean at Pine Point. ~ Michael Perry
Column: Look into the abyss at gorgeous Gulf Hagas
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

The Rim Trail follows Gulf Hagas for about three miles, with the gorge becoming deeper and deeper, and the falls becoming more and more spectacular. The trail rises and falls with the rim, sometimes offering expansive views from high above the water, and sometimes getting close enough for you to step onto rocks in the river. Here is where the scale of Gulf Hagas becomes apparent; at its deepest point the walls of the gorge are more than 100 feet high. Make sure you’re wearing sturdy footwear and exercise extreme caution, especially in slippery conditions. ~ Jake Christie
Letter: Mills should continue LePage’s fiscal restraint
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Though a difficult person for many, not an environmentalist and not diplomatic in anyone’s book, Gov. LePage has been trustworthy with the finances of the state. Governor-elect Janet Mills is experienced and good. Let us hope she will not discard the previous administration’s attention to keeping financial matters balanced and will be grateful for Maine’s improved fiscal position. ~ Joseph R.D. deKay, Hiram
Letter: Who brings an infant along on a hunting trip?
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Has the world gone completely mad? Hunter Christine Barnes, shown carrying her infant son on opening day, brings the question to the fore. How can anyone justify exposing a 7-month-old baby to the inherent dangers of errant bullets being discharged in the forest during prime hunting season? Every year there are reports of accidental injuries to and even deaths of hunters and others. This baby is even shown wearing a furry, animal-pelt-like jacket. Is there no law establishing age limits for kids on hunting trips? How about “reckless endangerment of a minor”? This infant had no choice in the decision to go hunting. ~ Gail W. Veliger, Cape Elizabeth
Letter: With election over, Maine needs development agenda that deals with climate change
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

With the midterms behind us, we are presented with an opportunity to set out a new agenda for social and economic development in Maine, in a time and place specifically affected by climate change. We already feel its impacts on weather, fisheries, tourism and more. Governor-elect Mills should convene the best of Maine’s talent to look forward to a new development vision, one that accepts the challenge of climate change and defines new solutions, one that lays out a plan based on our unique natural wealth. ~ Peter Neill, World Ocean Observatory
Letter: CMP’s powerline would help climate
Kennebec Journal - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

With devastating wildfires in California, an ever-evolving climate, and unstable oil costs, Central Maine Power’s New England Clean Energy Connect is something we should all be embracing. According to the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, we have only a dozen years to address this problem before things get even more out of hand. If Massachusetts and the rest of New England are using less oil and more hydropower, that will translate into healthier air for all of us to breathe and add greater relief to our wallets at the same time. ~ Michael Hall, Augusta [According to a 2017 Avangrid report, a Michael Hall is director of a nonprofit in Augusta that got a grant from Avangrid. ]
Column: University of Maine will start testing ticks for disease
Sun Journal - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

Most of us who spend time outdoors have had encounters with deer ticks, the bad ones, or know someone with Lyme disease. When it comes to ticks, the best defense is a good offense. After a day in the woods or the garden, always check yourself for ticks. What’s a good anti-tick spray? UMaine professor Jim Dill, a tick expert, and many others in the know, highly recommend a spray for your clothes only that contains the ingredient Permethrin. ~ V. Paul Reynolds
The kick off to the holiday season marks a busy time at West Gardiner’s Foggy Moon Farm
Kennebec Journal - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

The weeks leading up to the winter holiday season are the busiest for Judy and Tom Abbott. While all the holiday turkeys and pork were all spoken for by the end of September, the care and feeding continues. For 15 years, they have been raising and selling turkeys from their West Gardiner Foggy Moon Farm. About five years ago, they added pigs and two years later, they added cattle. “The hardest time of the year is when everyone starts eating more,” Abbott said.
New Partnership Could Boost Ridership For Greater Portland Metro
Maine Public - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

The Greater Portland Metro Bus system is being asked to be a partner in a mixed-use development planned for the site of the former Pike Industries quarry in Westbrook. The developers say they can access millions of dollars in tax free bond money if Metro leases the project's roadway infrastructure. Developer Waterstone would actually give Metro the money to make the lease payments. General Manager Greg Jordan says Metro is interested in the development because of its potential to generate transit ridership.
Sabattus hunter shot in Topsham after girlfriend slips on ice, fires shotgun
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

A Sabattus man was shot during a Saturday morning hunting trip in Topsham when his girlfriend, 21-year-old Sasha Leslie, also of Sabattus, slipped on ice and her shotgun went off. Joshua Stark, 25, was shot in the hip off of Cathance Road in Topsham around 7:30 a.m. and taken to Maine Medical Center in Portland, about 30 miles south, according to Cpl. John MacDonald of the Maine Warden Service. He is expected to survive the injury.
Habitat loss threatens all our futures, world leaders warned
Other - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

As a UN conference convenes to work out a new deal for protecting the planet’s biodiversity, the focus falls on the nations that are not attending. Amid the worst loss of life on Earth since the demise of the dinosaurs, the agenda at the Convention on Biological Diversity could hardly be more important, but the spirit of international collaboration appears to be as much at risk of extinction as the world’s endangered wildlife. The United States has never signed up.
They can bag more deer elsewhere, but hunters set their sights on Maine
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

When Ronald McAlpine of Jacksonville, Florida, hunts for white-tailed deer in his home state, he can shoot as many as he wants. Florida has no bag limit. So why does he come each fall to Maine, which has had a bag limit of one deer for almost a century? "The bigger deer in Maine,” McAlpine said. “Most people would like the opportunity to hunt in Maine.” Out-of-state hunters say the allure of bigger bucks and the challenge of hunting in uncrowded woods brings them to Maine. And more of them are coming. This year, Maine issued 84,745 any-deer permits – the most since the state went to a permit system in 1986. Nearly 5 percent – 3,906 – were given to out-of-state hunters. It’s the largest number of non-resident permits since 2007.
Flying squirrel colonies not the best roommates
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

The last thing a homeowner needs is a colony of flying squirrels living in their walls or attics, but should that happen, there are ways to get flying squirrels out of your house. “The best thing is to seal up the entire house and block any holes or cracks where they may be getting in,” said Randy Canarr of Maine Wildlife Management. “Animals like squirrels, rats, mice or other rodents inside a home are signs of a faulty and porous house that is open enough to let them in.”
Letter: The long view: CMP power line proposal hurts Maine
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

I’ve been a Maine Guide since 1987. I’ve led countless wilderness adventures. I have a thorough understanding and appreciation for our wilderness, and I have serious concerns over the risks of this power line proposal. The proposed 145-mile Central Maine Power line going over the western mountains region and the Kennebec River. will negatively affect the environment and Maine’s economy, and I’m gravely concerned about the devastating impact the power line would have on the therapeutic value of Maine’s wilderness. As an adventure-based counselor, I intentionally take clients into the wild to expose them to the therapeutic nature of wilderness settings because contact with nature offers a wide range of health benefits. ~ Rod Nadeau, North Yarmouth
Don’t Be Too Excited by Zinke’s Potential Departure
Outside - Friday, November 16, 2018 

What could be worse than a laughably incompetent Secretary of the Interior who’s transparent in his desire to sell off our nation’s public lands to extraction industries? Well, how about someone with the experience and expertise to actually pull that feat off? Meet David Bernhardt, Zinke’s deputy and the man who will take over the Department of the Interior if Zinke is fired or resigns, as is rumored.
Regulators close Maine’s shrimp fishery for next 3 years
Associated Press - Friday, November 16, 2018 

Regulators voted Friday to close the Gulf of Maine winter shrimp season for another three years, raising fears that the fishery decimated by rising water temperatures may never bounce back. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission has been taking a year-to-year approach in determining whether to allow a winter season, but the panel decided to shut it down for 2019, 2020 and 2021 after receiving a dismal report. The warming ocean and predation have decimated the shrimp fishery.
Column: A look at the works of Brunswick legendary botanist, Kate Furbish
Times Record - Friday, November 16, 2018 

A small often solitary woman and a trail breaker of a botanist collector and illustrator, Kate Furbish is enjoying a renaissance, both in name and in attention to her huge collection of illustrative paintings. Bowdoin’s museum, which holds Furbish’s paintings and is working to preserve them, is open every day but Monday. I recalled what Kat Stefko, the director of Bowdoin Library’s Department of Special Collections and Archives had said of Furbish: “I imagine her as a force of nature. She was described as a very small woman, fiery, determined. Nothing escaped her view or attention.” That summoned a Furbish contemporary, Henry David Thoreau. Thoreau was a little larger of frame, but the rest suits him perfectly. As does the scientific bent at the core both artists’ minds. ~ Sandy Stott
Trump will nominate former lobbyist to lead environmental agency
Associated Press - Friday, November 16, 2018 

Andrew Wheeler, a former congressional aide and lobbyist who has led the Environmental Protection Agency since his scandal-plagued predecessor resigned this year, got President Trump’s nod Friday for the permanent job. Wheeler, who has been acting EPA administrator, has been a methodical steward of Trump's deregulatory mission. Wheeler worked from 1995 to 2009 as a staffer for Republican Sen. Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma, a fervent denier of man-made climate change. Wheeler later worked as a lobbyist, including for coal giant Murray Energy Corp., which pushed hard at the outset of the Trump administration for coal-friendly policies from the EPA and other agencies.
Oyster company lays out plans for 40-acre expansion at start of marathon two-day hearing in Brunswick
Times Record - Friday, November 16, 2018 

The marathon public hearing over Mere Point Oyster Co.’s proposed 40-acre lease on Maquoit Bay will carry over into Monday after nearly four hours of discussion and debate Thursday night. Next week, opponents of the expansion will chime in. The Department of Marine Resources is holding the hearing to determine if Mere Point Oyster Co.’s proposed expansion, which would increase their annual oyster harvest from about 60,000 to up 1.5 million in the next three years, meets state requirements.
This biotech company is trying to grow bluefin tuna meat in a lab
Washington Post - Friday, November 16, 2018 

Where are the Silicon Valley start-ups promising to free us from the guilt of gobbling down a finger of otoro sushi, the rich bluefin belly meat, without contributing to the decline of the fish or the decline of our own health via mercury that accumulates in the flesh of this apex predator? Well, there is at least one scientific pilgrim: Brian Wyrwas is the co-founder and chief science officer for Finless Foods, a biotech dedicated to growing bluefin tuna in a lab. Growing stem cells into something that precisely mimics the fatty flesh of bluefin tuna is not considered possible yet. The technology for such a textured product is still years away from a commercial application.
Waterville recount flips plastic bag ban to rejection by 7-vote margin
Morning Sentinel - Friday, November 16, 2018 

A citywide ban on plastic shopping bags is headed to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court after a recount of the referendum reversed Election Day results, defeating the controversial measure by seven votes. In the recount Friday, the ban on bags was defeated 2,918-2,911, with five disputed ballots, 64 blanks and 164 challenged ballots not counted. It originally passed 3,052-2,906 and now will head to the court to determine if the challenged ballots are valid.
Driving Deer to Distraction
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Friday, November 16, 2018 

Bang! The new gun felt good. I glanced up, glanced left, glanced right. Where did he go? Then I saw him, on the ground, flopping around. I moved quickly and took a finishing shot. In a matter of seconds our deer drive – in reverse – had worked. Before me was the biggest deer I’d ever shot, with a gorgeous eight point rack. I hollered, “Dad! We got him!” The planned hunt – the deer drive – had worked, not as planned, but it worked, nonetheless. Dad jumped the deer and pushed them back to me. The buck weighed 214 pounds, my second “Biggest Bucks” patch in twenty years.
Maine farmers bundle up, gear up for winter markets
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 16, 2018 

Once a sign of spring and the new growing season in Maine, farmers markets are becoming a year-round tradition in the state with communities from Houlton to Biddeford extending the season by hosting winter farmers markets. And not even the nastiest of Maine winter weather can keep the diehard market fans away. There are 35 winter markets listed on the Maine Federation of Farmers Markets website [www.mainefarmersmarkets.org]. They span all counties except Lincoln.
Ag in the classroom
WAGM-TV - Friday, November 16, 2018 

At USDA offices and Soil and Water Conservation Districts around the County, professionals are reaching out to teachers about agriculture. Kelsey Ramerth, Soil Conservationist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service out of Fort Kent, said, "We have lots of materials that are good for all age groups. We're in a really interesting time right now where people are interested in where their food is coming from and how it gets there."
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