September 22, 2019  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Maine Outdoor Film Festival, Sep 29
Event - Posted - Sunday, September 22, 2019 

Opera House Arts hosts the Maine Outdoor Film Festival. At Stonington Ball Field, September 29, after sunset at approximately 8 pm, free but suggested $5 donation in support of Loon Echo Land Trust.
Maine Environmental News
Action Alert - Saturday, September 21, 2019 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond; hey, we're all connected). We have posted summaries and links to 60,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Birds of Prey, Sep 28
Event - Posted - Saturday, September 21, 2019 

Learn about the lives of Maine’s raptors. At L.C. Bates Museum, Hinckley, September 28, 1-2 pm.
Woodward Point Opening Celebration, Sep 28
Event - Posted - Saturday, September 21, 2019 

The Maine Coast Heritage Trust and Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust will celebrate the opening of the new Woodward Point Preserve in Brunswick, September 28, 1 pm
National Public Lands Day, Sep 28
Event - Posted - Saturday, September 21, 2019 

National Public Lands Day is the nation's largest single-day volunteer effort. A signature event of the National Environmental Education Foundation, it promotes both popular enjoyment and volunteer conservation of public lands. September 28.
People of a Feather, Sep 27
Event - Posted - Friday, September 20, 2019 

This film explores the impact of the development of hydropower on the traditional life of the Inuits in Canada’s Hudson Bay. A discussion addressing Central Maine Power’s transmission line through Western Maine and its impacts will follow. At 114 Main St, Kennebunk, September 27, 6:30 pm. Sponsored by Sierra Club Maine.
Learn about environmentally-friendly lawn care, Sep 26
Event - Posted - Thursday, September 19, 2019 

How to create a more resilient, beautiful lawn, without relying on chemical fertilizers or weed and bug killers. At Yarmouth Water District, September 26, 6 pm, pre-register.
Wilderness and Spirit, A Mountain Called Katahdin, Sep 26
Event - Posted - Thursday, September 19, 2019 

Film screening and discussion with filmmaker Huey (James Coleman). At Maine Historical Society, Portland,, September 26, 6-8 pm.
Cobbosseecontee Stream fish, Sep 26
Event - Posted - Thursday, September 19, 2019 

Stephen Brooke facilitates a discussion about restoring the native sea run fish to Cobbossee stream. At Gardiner Public Library, September 26, 6:30 pm.
LUPC to Hold Public Meeting on Approved Fish River Lakes Concept Plan, Sep 25
Event - Posted - Wednesday, September 18, 2019 

The Maine Land Use Planning Commission staff will hold an open house and public meeting regarding the Fish River Chain of Lakes Concept Plan. At Caribou Inn and Convention Center, September 25, Open House 6 pm; Public Meeting 6:30 pm.
Phenology Trail, Sep 25
Event - Posted - Wednesday, September 18, 2019 

The Schoodic Institute and Blue Hill Heritage Trust will hold a free citizen science training for Phenology Trail. Phenology, or nature’s calendar, is the study of plant and animal life cycle events. It includes tracking the timing of flowering and fruiting plants, emergence of insects, and bird migrations. At Carter Nature Preserve, Surry, September 25, 4-6:30 pm.
Public Comment Forum on Aerial Herbicide, Sep 24
Event - Posted - Wednesday, September 18, 2019 

Public meeting on aerial herbicide applications for managing forestland. At UMaine at Fort Kent, September 24, 2019, 6 pm.
The Ecology of the Heath, Sep 24
Event - Posted - Tuesday, September 17, 2019 

Naturalist Fred Cichocki will describe the ecology of the 12-acre heath at Cathance Rive Nature Preserve in Topsham and other sphagnum moss wetlands. At Topsham Public Library, September 24, 6 pm. Sponsored by Cathance River Education Alliance.
Oppose CMP's transmission corridor
Action Alert - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Ask Maine’s Congressional delegation to urge the Army Corps for an Environmental Impact Statement and public hearing on Central Maine Power’s proposal for a transmission corridor through Western Maine. ~ Nick Bennett, NRCM
No logging in the Tongass National Forest
Action Alert - Monday, September 16, 2019 

The Amazon is burning, yet Donald Trump wants to open the world's largest intact temperate forest to mining and logging exploitation. He is opening 10 million acres in the Tongass National Forest to brutal exploitation. Tongass retains more carbon than any forest in the U.S., provides habitat for iconic wild creatures and contains old-growth trees as much as 1,000 years old. Don't let Trump destroy it. ~ CREDO Action
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News Items
Fish passage restored in the Ducktrap
Working Waterfront - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The Ducktrap River is a tributary of Penobscot Bay. Home to endangered wild Atlantic salmon, alewives, and sea-run brook trout, the Ducktrap has its headwaters in Pitcher and Coleman ponds. Sea-run fish attempting to complete spawning migrations must travel beneath multiple roads to reach this freshwater habitat, and often their route is blocked by undersized and broken culvert pipes at road crossings. In October, the town of Lincolnville replaced a deteriorated and undersized culvert beneath Slab City Road with an open-bottom culvert, allowing alewives and other fish to pass through.
Editorial: Wind storm highlighted weaknesses in Maine electrical grid. Who will fix them?
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 17, 2017 

Mainers understand that power outages happen. But, the long-lasting power outage that began on Oct. 30 left utility customers, town officials, state lawmakers and others with a lot of questions. Both the Public Utilities Commission and Maine Legislature plan to review the storm’s impacts and costs. The PUC, as part of its routine regulatory process, will determine how much of the repair and restoration costs are passed on to the utilities’ ratepayers. The task is less about assigning blame than about making needed improvements to minimize outages in the future.
Lawsuit alleges New England energy companies overcharged customers
Portland Press Herald - Friday, November 17, 2017 

A class-action lawsuit has been filed against the parent company of Central Maine Power Co. and another energy company alleging that the two conspired to raise electricity rates for customers in New England. The suit, filed in federal court in Boston on Tuesday, alleges that Avangrid, the Connecticut-based corporate parent of CMP, and Eversource Energy, inflated electricity prices to New England customers by as much as 20 percent from 2013 to 2016. The suit says that 14.7 million customers in New England were affected by “a unique monopoly” between Eversource and Avangrid that resulted in $3.6 billion in over charges.
A History of Efforts to Reduce Nitrogen in Casco Bay
Maine Environmental News - Friday, November 17, 2017 

After nearly a year of work, the Portland Water District and Friends of Casco Bay developed an agreement aimed at reducing nitrogen pollution from sewage effluent. The collaboration helped the Maine Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) develop a 139-page, five-year permit for the City of Portland’s East End Wastewater Treatment Facility, which is managed by the Water District, that will better protect water quality. The $12 million upgrade to the plant’s aeration system may help reduce nitrogen in the plant’s effluent waters by 500 to 1,000 pounds each day.
Region’s natural gas pipelines near capacity in winter, operator says
Associated Press - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The independent corporation overseeing the operation of New England’s power system says natural gas pipelines feeding the region are so constrained that electricity prices are driven higher during cold winters. ISO New England President Gordon van Welie says regional pipelines were built for gas distribution companies’ heating demands, not for power generation. He says they’re at, or near capacity, in winter and generators have to use more expensive fuels, including oil and liquefied natural gas.
What do you do when the butcher gives you the wrong moose?
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 17, 2017 

For years, I’ve heard the whispered tales from disgruntled hunters who were certain that the meat cutter they’d trusted with their deer or moose or bear had engaged in some nefarious behavior, and had clearly, obviously, certainly stolen prime cuts. And since it’s basically impossible to convince an angry hunter that shooting their moose six times may have made some of the meat inedible, and led to a less-than-expected yield, I’ve chosen to keep quiet. Then, I ended up with a mystery of my own. Simply put, the moose I shot in October grew.
Drought means another tough year for Maine bees
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The final numbers for 2017’s Maine honey production are not known yet, but those who work with bees and with the beekeepers say it is likely down from last year. There are 1,147 registered beekeepers in Maine managing 9,853 hives, according to Lund. The dry weather was especially tough on beekeepers in the southern part of the state.
Arrest made in arson fire at former Lincoln mill, DEP worried about contaminants
Mainebiz - Friday, November 17, 2017 

Investigators from the EPA and the Maine DEP plan to tour the former Lincoln Paper and Tissue Mill today in preparation for testing on Saturday to determine possible health threats from smoldering rubble around two mill buildings destroyed by a fire Wednesday. The chief environmental concerns are possible contamination from dioxin and polychlorinated biphenyls present on the site from the pulp and papermaking processes, as well as asbestos. Lincoln Pulp and Paper closed in 2015. Almost 130 workers lost their jobs.
Outstanding leaders organize new native fish advocacy group
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Friday, November 17, 2017 

Exciting news! A new organization focused on our native fish has been organized, “to protect, preserve, and restore native fish populations through stewardship of the fish and their habitats.” Outstanding fisheries leaders at the state and national level comprise the national board, with state boards in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
Getting More 'Wolflike' Is The Key To The Future For Coyotes
Associated Press - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The future of the coyotes that roam from Newfoundland to Virginia could hinge on the animals becoming the "wolves'' of the East Coast. Coyotes have lived in the East since the 1930s, and recent genetic tests have shown they are actually a mixture of coyote, wolf and dog. Scientists say they might be getting genetically closer to wolves, helping them become better predators and thrive in urban areas and the woods of Maine. That means people will need to learn to coexist with them.
Plan To Improve Lobstering Data Collection Faces Hearings
Associated Press - Friday, November 17, 2017 

Interstate fishing regulators are holding a series of hearings on the East Coast about a plan to improve data collection in the lobster fishery. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission says it wants to improve harvest reporting and biological data collection to better inform fishing regulations. The hearings include Jan. 10 in Scarborough, and Jan. 11 in Ellsworth.
Katahdin Woods and Waters: "Renewed Hope for Maine"
Other - Friday, November 17, 2017 

From Maine to California, hundreds of small businesses are speaking up on behalf of some of the country's most treasured places. Nearly 600 businesses and chambers of commerce on Thursday sent a letter asking the head of the National Economic Council to encourage the Trump Administration to preserve safeguards for national monuments, including Maine's Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument. John Hafford owns a design and marketing firm nearby and says the Katahdin monument has been a godsend to the area.
Letter: A bipartisan way on climate change
Kennebec Journal - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The flashover time in home fires has been reduced from 15 minutes to only five minutes due to the present-day preponderance of toxic plastic and man-made materials in our homes and buildings. Fortunately, despite the Trump administration, Congress is looking at legislation to deal with the negative effects of fossil fuel use. A study by Regional Economic Models showed that a revenue neutral carbon tax, which would return all the fees collected to U.S. households equally, could increase employment while dramatically cutting carbon emissions. As a series of hurricanes and wildfires are highlighting the dangers of climate change, let’s urge our legislators, state and federal, to put aside partisanship and search for solutions to our climate dilemma. ~ Philippa Solomon, Readfield
Letter: Maine kids with asthma need Clean Power Plan
Kennebec Journal - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The proposal to revoke the Clean Power Plan gives power plants a license to pollute. Children with asthma, including my son and the 21,726 children suffering from asthma in Maine, need healthy air. I call on Sens. Susan Collins and Angus King to take steps to ensure that EPA follows the law and protects our health from unlimited carbon pollution. Don’t let the EPA roll back the Clean Power Plan. ~ Patricia Salpietro, Readfield
Letter: Who owns land between high- and low-tide marks? Answer is simple
Portland Press Herald - Friday, November 17, 2017 

I couldn’t believe my ears when I heard Wednesday that the debate on who owns the land between the high- and low-tide marks is still going on! The solution seems so simple: Go to town hall and check the property lines listed on the property tax records for those properties abutting the ocean. If the property owner is paying property taxes for the land up to the high-tide mark only, then the “exposed land” at low tide is public. If the property owner is paying taxes for the land up to the low tide mark, then the “exposed land” is private. Problem solved! ~ Steven C. Pomelow, Gorham
Letter: Trump needs to act on climate change
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 17, 2017 

It has been a year of extreme weather everywhere in the world. Climate change and global warming is not something new to people. But have we been taking it seriously enough? President Donald Trump does not seem to think this is a priority or that we as the people should take responsibility for it. We can change our policies here in the U.S. to help make a difference. We need our president to stand by his people and our earth. We can’t make these changes without our presidents’ support and interest in this urgency. ~ Briana Libby, Kennebunk
Letter: Woods don’t belong to hunters
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 17, 2017 

For anyone to blame the shooting death of Karen Wrentzel on the fact she was not wearing hunter orange is asinine. I remember Karen Wood innocently hanging clothes out in her own backyard in Hermon and being shot by a hunter. I was aghast then that she was blamed for her own demise. It seems that one hunting season runs right into another now in Maine. Just how many days are left to those of us who like to wander and hike and just observe nature? There is Sunday. Bear hunters and others have tried more than once to “kill” that day of reprieve. It is a hunter’s responsibility to know what he or she is aiming at — no excuses. The woods do not belong to the hunters. ~ Tonya Troiani, Meddybemps
Maine outdoor companies to form trade group
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

A collection of Maine businesses has formed a new trade group aimed at growing the state’s outdoor products and service industry. Maine Outdoor Brands will be announced at a Nov. 20 press conference at the Press Hotel in Portland. The group, which has 26 members, “sees value in leveraging what Maine is best known for –the outdoors — in creating a business climate conducive to outdoor product brands and the younger workforce they attract.” Members include clothing, gear, boat, ski, surf and snowboard manufacturers, as well as food companies, marketing companies and law firms. Among them are L.L. Bean, Hyperlite, Grain Surfboards, Good To-Go and Old Town canoe and kayak.
Land trusts and trail stewards facing long cleanup from October storm
Coastal Journal - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

As towns continue to clean up after the historic Oct. 30 storm, the focus has been on getting roads cleared and buildings repaired. But off in the woods of many land trusts, hundreds of trees are still blocking trails as the winds rearranged entire landscapes. Volunteers and staff at these organizations are still working out how they’re going to take care of all the debris, and what rules they’ll have to negotiate when they do so.
Trump lifts ban on importing elephants killed as trophies
Associated Press - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

The Trump administration said it will allow the importation of body parts from African elephants shot for sport, contending that encouraging wealthy big-game hunters to kill them will aid the vulnerable species. Animal rights activists and environmental groups expressed skepticism Thursday that killing elephants could help save them. Wayne Pacelle, the president and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States, said the policy change sends the wrong signal amid international efforts to curb illegal poaching. But the move was quickly praised by groups that champion big-game trophy hunting, including Safari Club International and the lobbying arm of the National Rifle Association.
Meredith Corp. buys Time Inc. for $1.8 billion with Koch mney
Associated Press - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Meredith Corp. announced Sunday that it is buying Time Inc. for about $1.8 billion, a deal that joins two giant magazine companies. Meredith is using $3.55 billion in financing commitments from a variety of lenders and a $650 million preferred equity from Koch Equity Development, an investment arm of Koch Industries, to finance the deal.
Project to bring Canadian hydropower to New England gets federal approval
Associated Press - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

The granting of what is called the Presidential permit allows for the $1.6 billion project to take hydropower across an international border and connect to the United States grid. The Northern Pass project calls for building a 192-mile electricity transmission line in New Hampshire. The project has pitted supporters who argue it will create jobs and cut energy costs against those who fear the transmission lines will destroy scenic views, reduce property values and hurt tourism. “They have a permit to cross the international border but they don’t have a permit to site the project on 192 miles of New Hampshire landscape. That is what the SEC will determine,” said Will Abbott, the vice president for policy with the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, which opposes the project.
UMaine student discovered new species of wasp – and it doesn’t sting
Associated Press - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

State officials say a University of Maine student has discovered a new species of wasp. Hillary Morin Peterson discovered the species while doing work for her thesis. The Brunswick resident named the wasp Ormocerus dirigoius, in tribute to Maine’s motto, “Dirigo.” It means “I lead” in Latin. Peterson discovered the small, non-stinging species of wasp while doing research about the invasive winter moths that live in Maine. Her work was in collaboration with the Maine Forest Service.
Keystone Pipeline closed through several states after 200,000-gallon leak
Other - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

NBC News - Part of the controversial Keystone Pipeline was shut down Thursday after more than 200,000 gallons of oil leaked in South Dakota, the state and the company that runs the pipeline said Thursday.
Why Did The Passenger Pigeon Go Extinct? The Answer Might Lie In Their Toes
National Public Radio - Thursday, November 16, 2017 

Scientists believe they may have new insights into why passenger pigeons went extinct, after analyzing DNA from the toes of birds that have been carefully preserved in museums for over a century. The bottom line, according to Beth Shapiro, one of the researchers on a newly released study in the journal Science, is that "passenger pigeon extinction was avoidable. It was entirely our fault. We over-hunted and over-exploited this amazing animal, and we should try to be careful about what we're doing today."
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