June 19, 2019  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Tall Tales, Fish Tails, & Damn Lies, Jun 27
Event - Posted - Thursday, June 20, 2019 

Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries will hold a night of music and words from a fishing community with performances and story-telling by Frank Gotwals, Dennis Damon, Bob Quinn and many more. At Stonington Opera House, June 27, 6:30 pm. Proceeds benefit a sustainable future for local fisheries and communities.
Can environmental action be good for business? Jun 27
Event - Posted - Thursday, June 20, 2019 

An informal policy and issue-based discussions held at local businesses over coffee or beer. Speakers: Kristan Porter, Maine Lobstermen's Association; Abe Furth, Orono Brewing Company; Brad Ryder, Epic Sports. ~ Natural Resources Council of Maine
Maine Environmental News
Action Alert - Wednesday, June 19, 2019 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond; hey, we're all connected). We have posted summaries and links to 60,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Save Right Whales
Action Alert - Wednesday, June 19, 2019 

New England’s iconic whale is on the brink of extinction. A bill in Congress called Scientific Assistance for Very Endangered (“SAVE”) Right Whales could help this key species recover. ~ Conservation Law Foundation
Water: What is has to teach us, Jun 25
Event - Posted - Tuesday, June 18, 2019 

Learn about fresh water ecosystems and new aquaculture operations in the MidCoast region. At Topsham Public Library, June 25, 6 pm. Sponsored by Cathance River Education Alliance.
Proposed Coyote Center, Jun 24
Event - Posted - Monday, June 17, 2019 

Biologist Geri Vistein will share an informative film about the future Coyote Center in Maine, followed by a discussion of Maine’s coyotes. At Lithgow Public Library, Augusta, June 24, 6:30 pm.
Teen Wilderness Expedition, July 23-25
Announcement - Sunday, June 16, 2019 

The Teen Wilderness Expedition is a 3-day, 2-night, all-inclusive adventure for 12-16 year olds at Little Lyford Lodge, July 23-25. Offered by Piscataquis County Soil and Water Conservation District and Appalachian Mountain Club.
Maine State Museum hosts Bike Day, Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

Join the Maine State Museum, Bicycle Coalition of Maine and the Maine State Library in a free family event to commemorate the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote and learn about the benefits of safe, relaxed bike riding. At Maine State Museum, June 22, 10 am - 1 pm.
Woodland Management with Birds in Mind, Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

A Forestry for Maine Birds workshop for landowners, foresters and loggers interested in learning how they can support Maine’s forest songbirds. At Somerset County Cooperative Extension office, Skowhegan, and on the adjacent Yankee Woodlot Demonstration Forest, June 22, 9 am - noon.
Hike Puzzle Mt., Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

A moderate to strenuous hike of 8.5 miles. Cross several exposed granite boulders and ledges offering views of the Sunday River ski area, Grafton Notch, and the Presidentials, June 22, pre-register. Sponsored by Appalachian Mountain Club.
Androscoggin River Canoe & Kayak River Race, Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

This event is open to all to launch canoes, kayaks, paddle boards, (and more) into the Androscoggin River and complete one of three courses of varying length and challenge. At Festival Plaza, Auburn, June 22, 9 am, $15 for single paddler, $25 for a double, benefits Androscoggin Land Trust.
Plants of Corea Heath, Jun 22
Event - Posted - Saturday, June 15, 2019 

Join Jill Weber, botanist and co-author of The Plants of Acadia National Park, to learn about carnivorous plants, orchids, stunted trees and shrubs and cotton-grass. At Corea Heath, Goldsboro, June 22, 8:30 am. Sponsored by Downeast Audubon.
Maine Wildlife Park open house, Jun 21
Event - Posted - Friday, June 14, 2019 

The Maine Wildlife Park in Gray will hold an open house with free admission, June 21, 5-8 pm. Feeding times for moose, lynx, foxes, cougars, vultures and bears will be posted.
Call for a presidential primary debate on climate change
Action Alert - Thursday, June 13, 2019 

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez has rejected a presidential primary debate on climate change. 15 Democratic presidential candidates have joined the call. So can you. ~ CREDO Action
Trekking through Time
Announcement - Thursday, June 13, 2019 

From June through October, Lakes Environmental Association, Loon Echo Land Trust, Greater Lovell Land Trust, Upper Saco Valley Land Trust, and Western Foothills Land Trust will host the Trekking through Time Series. Once a month throughout the summer and early fall, each organization will host a historical tour of one of its conservation properties.
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News Items
Land for Maine's Future awards Ragged Mountain project $500,000
Penobscot Bay Pilot - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

The Coastal Mountains Land Trust's Round the Mountain Collaboration has won a Land for Maine's Future grant of $500,000 to support the conservation of Ragged Mountain in Rockport, Camden and Hope. The money will go toward one of the three components of the Round the Mountain Collaboration: the 790-acre Mirror Lake Conservation Easement project, which received LMF's highest score. All together, the collaboration has raised $3 million of the $4.2 million needed to fulfill its goals. The project includes construction of a proposed nine-mile Round the Mountain Trail and the purchase of two conservation easements to protect more than 1,400 acres of land.
Lobster Catch Might be Less this Year
Associated Press - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

Members of the lobster industry say Maine's lobster haul might be less this year, and prices have drifted downward for both lobstermen and consumers. American lobster fishing is in the midst of a multiyear boom, with Maine fishermen setting a record of nearly 131 million pounds last year. Fishermen in the state have caught more than 100 million pounds for six years in a row after never previously reaching that total. But market analyst John Sackton says some in the industry believe catch could be as much as 30 percent off this year. Meanwhile, prices for live lobsters are lagging behind last year. Maine is far and away the biggest lobster producing state in the U.S. Maine fishermen accounted for more than 80 percent of the nationwide catch last year.
Legal dispute snags revitalization of Old Town mill
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

The latest attempt to transform a shuttered pulp mill in Old Town into a production center for wood-based energy and fuels is tangled in a lawsuit filed by a prospective buyer, who says he was illegally pushed out of a $10 million deal in favor of a competitor. Samuel Eakin of Cape Elizabeth, the managing director of Relentless Capital Co. and an allied company, Old Town Utility & Technology Park, who hoped to sell wood-based energy to UMaine, sues over breach of contract and wants the sale to a third party blocked. The university operates the Forest Bioproducts Research Center in a corner of the mill, where it’s working to commercialize fuels, chemicals and materials made from wood. That’s why the future of the Old Town mill has taken on a broader significance.
State largely ignores role as seas grow more acidic
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

Despite a bipartisan recognition of a threat to Maine's shellfish industry, leadership on the issue has fallen to a group of concerned volunteers. “For a state whose identity and economy is so heavily dependent on marine resources, I think it is really shameful that we are not doing enough to look at the threats of changing ocean chemistry,” says Bill Mook, who had to develop water treatment systems after watching acidic water kill crop after crop of newly hatched oysters. Rep. Devin says, “It’s the governor and a few of his minions that have blocked the ocean acidification bills. We’re not going to be able to do anything environmental with Governor LePage in office.”
Planting of Atlantic salmon eggs in Kennebec River starting to pay dividends
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

Atlantic salmon were first listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2000 in a small portion of Maine. In 2009 the list was expanded and the salmon’s status was elevated to endangered. Since 2010 as many as 300,000 to 1 million Atlantic salmon eggs grown in a hatchery have been planted, or seeded, in the Kennebec watershed. The Sandy isn’t the only river in Maine where hatchery-grown eggs are planted. Marine Resources also has planted salmon eggs in the Sheepscot and Penobscot rivers, the Downeast Salmon Federation has in the Machias, Pleasant and Narraguagus rivers, and the Saco River Salmon Restoration Alliance has in the Saco.
Scientist Steve Eayrs knows how to build a better fish trap
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

Steve Eayrs, a research scientist at Gulf of Maine Research Institute since 2007, who works in the area of fish behavior and gear technology, has designed some new spins on old gear, intended to make fishing more efficient and sustainable.
Maine farmers raising turkeys in record numbers
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

Maine farmers are increasingly raising turkeys for the meat market with the number of live turkey poults being brought into the state up 30 percent in the last year. Farmers say they’re responding to a demand for locally raised meat and a lucrative market.
Column: Finish the season with a local paddle
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

We are wrapping up our 2017 canoeing with the theme of getting out there one last time before the snow flies, and exploring someplace close to home. In our case that means an outing on the nearby Androscoggin River in Brunswick. The big windstorm of a few weeks ago has created extra yard work for many of us, so getting away for a daylong outing is not as likely right now. A few hours on the water in a pretty setting provides a much-needed therapeutic interlude. ~ Michael Perry
Column: Extra preparation worth it for the joy of winter hiking
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

Hiking during the winter feels like a totally different exercise than the rest of the year, with a solitude and silence that don’t exist during the warmer months. The flow of rivers slows to a trickle or stops completely, and many animals migrate to warmer climates or begin to hibernate. The buzz of insects, a constant annoyance during the summer, dies completely. And, while some hardy souls enjoy hiking during the winter, the trails empty almost completely. The cold also makes winter hiking a more dangerous adventure. This isn’t meant to discourage winter hiking, but to encourage those embarking on it to take due caution and prepare. ~ Josh Christie
Column: Perspective needed in debate on deer scents
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

The threat of Chronic Wasting Disease is very real. It continues to spread, though we still don’t know how, or ultimately what impact that could have on wild deer populations. We could take the cautious approach and ban urine-based scents based solely on the possibility that something could happen, though there’s no real evidence to support that notion. Or we could let hunters continue to spend their $9 an ounce and hope nothing bad does happen. I guess the right course of action is a matter of perspective. ~ Bob Humphrey
Opinion: The rare beauty of a 64-crayon fall day
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

This was a Crayola kind of day. What’s that, you say? Well, it’s a day where if I had a box of 64 Crayola crayons and, if I could draw, I could use every single color! Oh! If I could only draw! ~ Anne Cataldo, Boothbay
Letter: Birding adds joy to exploring Maine
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 19, 2017 

Deirdre Fleming’s Nov. 5 story about deer hunters who enjoy birding was right on the mark. My wife, Linda, and I started birding 12 years ago, and I wish we’d started much sooner. Birding adds so much to our trips, and we now often travel just to see birds. You don’t have to be an expert to enjoy birding in Maine. And it sure does add a wonderful element to spending time in our great outdoors. ~ George Smith, Mount Vernon
Column: Elk hunt, part 2: The trail food search
Sun Journal - Saturday, November 18, 2017 

This is part two of a three part column series about my fall elk hunt to Colorado. ~ V. Paul Reynolds
Big backlash resurrects big-game ban
Washington Post - Saturday, November 18, 2017 

A combination of public and private pressure prompted President Trump to overturn his administration’s recent move to allow elephants shot for sport in Zimbabwe and Zambia to be imported back to the United States as trophies, according to interviews with several individuals briefed on the decision. Trump’s announcement Friday that he was putting the decision “on hold” until he could personally review it marked animal welfare activists’ first federal victory since the president took office in January.
NASA map shows 20 years of changing seasons
Associated Press - Saturday, November 18, 2017 

NASA captured 20 years of changing seasons in a striking new global map of the home planet. The polar ice caps and snow cover are shown ebbing and flowing with the seasons. The varying ocean shades of blue, green, red and purple depict the abundance – or lack – of undersea life. Two decades – from September 1997 to this past September – are crunched into 2 1/2 minutes of viewing.
Bonn climate talks end with progress despite glitches
Associated Press - Saturday, November 18, 2017 

Delegates stumbled out of an all-night negotiating session at this year’s global climate talks, expressing satisfaction Saturday at the progress made toward creating a comprehensive rulebook for fighting global warming. The two-week meeting in Bonn was billed as a “blue-collar” event designed to work out technical details of the 2015 Paris climate accord. But fears had loomed beforehand that the administration of President Trump, who rejects the Paris agreement, would seek to block any advances seen as counter to American interests. In the end, most agreed that U.S. diplomats had engaged constructively, while delegations from several American states, cities and businesses were praised for committing themselves to the goals of the Paris agreement.
Farmers look to extend vegetable growing season
Kennebec Journal - Saturday, November 18, 2017 

While Maine’s potato farmers have a “long tradition” of growing during the summer season and storing their harvest for the rest of the year, more and more vegetable farmers are using greenhouses to actively grow hardier vegetables through December, January and February. The greenhouses employed by Maine farmers are often unheated and made of durable sheets of plastic over a metal frame. Their technology has improved, so that the structures can better withstand the snow and other elements of winter. They’re also commonly called “hoop houses” and “high tunnels.”
Hike: McPhetres Farm Forest
Aislinn Sarnacki Act Out Blog - Saturday, November 18, 2017 

Owned by the Town of Veazie, the 25-acre McPhetres Farm Forest contains a network of marked walking trails that are open to the public year round. The quiet property is great for dog walking, trail running and snowshoeing. It’s also a good place for wildlife watching and birding.
What you should know about exploring Sears Island, a treasure of midcoast Maine
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, November 18, 2017 

Birders, beachgoers, clamdiggers and history buffs — you’ll find them all on Sears Island, a 936-acre treasure conserved and open for public recreation off the coast of Searsport. One of the largest undeveloped islands on the Eastern Seaboard, Sears Island has a fascinating history, is rich in natural resources, and is connected to mainland Searsport by a causeway, making it easily accessible for visitors year round.
This once low-key fishing city could become Maine’s next big cruise ship destination
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, November 18, 2017 

Cruise ships anchor in Rockland harbor far less often than they do in Portland, Bar Harbor or even Boothbay Harbor. But as the sight of huge passenger ships becomes more common in a harbor accustomed to much smaller fishing vessels, city leaders are grappling to cope with the impacts.
Letter: Trump makes America irrelevant
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, November 18, 2017 

With actions taken by President Donald Trump since January 2017, we have abdicated our nation’s respected international leadership on the major economic and environmental issues. Trump talks about “America first” while making us irrelevant. Trump withdrew the United States from the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership, an international trade agreement affecting 40 percent of all world trade. In June, Trump announced he would withdraw the United States from the Paris climate agreement of 2015. The agreement has now been adopted by every other nation in the United Nations as response to the record breaking rising greenhouse gas emissions. I am saddened. ~ Pam Person, Orland
Estuary Beat: Fish on the York River, saving Morse River watershed, and Portand's Presumpscot
Working Waterfront - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve conducted a survey of fishes in the York River last spring as part of a National Park Service study to determine if the river could be designated a federal Wild and Scenic River. The study, the first in more than 15 years, was intended to monitor migrations of sea-run or diadromous fish, including rainbow smelt, alewife, blueback herring, and sea-run brook trout, according to project coordinator Jake Aman. Aman noted finding more than 1,200 adult rainbow smelt and more than 600 alewives. “It appears that the York River may support the largest spawning run of rainbow smelt between Great Bay and Casco Bay.”
Finding fish in the York River
Working Waterfront - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve conducted a survey of fishes in the York River last spring as part of a National Park Service study to determine if the river could be designated a federal Wild and Scenic River. The study was intended to monitor migrations of sea-run or diadromous fish, including rainbow smelt, alewife, blueback herring, and sea-run brook trout, according to project coordinator Jake Aman. Aman noted finding more than 1,200 adult rainbow smelt and more than 600 alewives. “It appears that the York River may support the largest spawning run of rainbow smelt between Great Bay and Casco Bay,” he said.
Phippsburg Land Trust seeks to protect Morse River watershed
Working Waterfront - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The Morse River is a small coastal river that flows through several different types of wetlands before joining the ocean at the western end of Popham Beach. These wetlands are the focus of the Phippsburg Land Trust, which has until December 31 to raise the necessary funds to acquire two separate parcels: 27 acres next to the Morse River and another 19.6 acres of freshwater marsh that connects to Spirit Pond. The cost for purchase, stewardship, and preservation will total about $225,000. In conserving these wetland parcels, the land trust hopes to maintain water quality and protect wildlife habitat.
Portland’s popularity puts development pressure on Presumpscot
Working Waterfront - Friday, November 17, 2017 

While the city of Westbrook decides whether or not to sell a public green space next to the river for hotel development, Falmouth has approved 32 condominiums on Blackstrap Road, and West Falmouth continues to debate a zoning change to allow for high-density housing between the Maine Turnpike and Piscataqua Stream, a major tributary of the Presumpscot. A focus of restoration since at least 2000, the Presumpscot River flows from Sebago Lake and meets Casco Bay just north of Back Cove. Planning boards in all three municipalities are trying to reconcile approved zoning policies with resident resistance to high-density housing.
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