August 21, 2019  
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Maine Environmental News
Action Alert - Tuesday, August 20, 2019 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond; hey, we're all connected). We have posted summaries and links to 60,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Solo Paddle of Northern Forest Canoe Trail, Aug 27
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 20, 2019 

Laurie Apgar Chandler will read from and discuss her book “Upwards,” which tells her story as the first woman to solo paddle New England’s 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail. At Bailey Library, Winthrop, August 27, 6:30 pm.
Keeping Acadia Healthy With New Science, Aug 26
Event - Posted - Monday, August 19, 2019 

Abraham Miller-Rushing and Rebecca Cole-Will will discuss how Acadia National Park is facing a triple environmental challenge: global warming, acid rain, and increased visitation. At Bar Harbor, August 26, 5 pm.
Maine’s Seaweed Scene, Sep 26
Event - Posted - Monday, August 19, 2019 

Susan Hand Shetterly and Robin Hadlock Seeley will discuss the importance of protected wild habitats and the critical role of seaweed in the Gulf of Maine. At Moore Community Center, Ellsworth, September 26, 7 pm. Hosted by Downeast Audubon.
Bee apocalypse
Action Alert - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

U.S. agriculture today is 48 times more toxic to honeybees than it was 25 years ago—almost entirely because of neonicotinoid pesticides. It's part of an "insect apocalypse." But instead of taking action, the Trump administration is shredding protections for bees. Will you stand with me in the fight to save the bees? ~ Mayor Ethan Strimling, Portland, Maine
Maine Farmland Trust Gallery 20th Anniversary Retrospective Exhibit, thru Oct 11
Announcement - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

To celebrate Maine Farmland Trust’s 20th anniversary, a curated retrospective featuring a selection of works that have been exhibited at the MFT Gallery over the past 10 years is on view through October 11.
Brechlin reading, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

Earl Brechlin, a Registered Maine Guide, will read from his book, "Return to Moose River: In Search of the Spirit of the Great North Woods," essays describing white-water canoeing, snowmobiling, and backpacking adventures in many parts of Maine. At Albert Church Brown Memorial Library, China, August 25, 2 pm.
Kennebec Land Trust annual meeting, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

At Camp Androscoggin, Wayne, August 25. The trust has conserved more than 6,300 acres and constructed 44 miles of trails on KLT protected lands.
Maine Herpetological Society Reptile Expo, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 17, 2019 

50+ vendors, 1,000+ reptiles, plus Mr. Drew and His Animals Too. At Ramada Inn, Lewiston, August 25, 10 am - 4 pm, $7, kids under 12 free.
Families in the Outdoors, Aug 24
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 17, 2019 

Learn about all kinds of Maine bugs – the good, the bad and the very strange looking. At Law Farm, Dover-Foxcroft, August 24, 9 am - noon.
Wabanaki artists, culture event, Aug 24
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 17, 2019 

40+ members of the Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Micmac and Maliseet tribes will demonstrate traditional Wabanaki art forms, including basketmaking, stone carving, bark etching, beadwork and jewelry, in addition to performances of drumming, singing, dancing and storytelling. At Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, New Gloucester, August 24, 10 am - 3 pm.
A Toxic Tale: Trump's Environmental Impact, Aug 23
Announcement - Friday, August 16, 2019 

According to the EPA's own analysis, the Trump administration's Affordable Clean Energy rule will result in up to 1,400 more premature deaths a year by 2030. Learn about the impacts of Trump's deregulation campaign on a CNN Special Report "A Toxic Tale: Trump's Environmental Impact." August 23, 10 pm.
Close Encounters of the First Kind, Aug 22
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 15, 2019 

Maine’s First Ship hosts Ken Hamilton for a discussion of the earliest European and indigenous people interactions, from 16th century Jacques Cartier and Basque fishermen to early 17th century French and English explorers. At Bath Freight Shed, Bath, August 22, 7 pm.
Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument Anniversary Celebration, Aug 23-24
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 15, 2019 

Dinner, music, silent auction, awards, and toast to commemorate the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument’s August 24th, 2016 proclamation. At New England Outdoor Center, T1 R8, August 23-24, $25.
Earth Day 2020
Announcement - Thursday, August 15, 2019 

Earth Day, the global environmental movement for a cleaner, greener, safer and more just world for all, turns 50 next year. Want to help?
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News Items
Maine inventor’s device puts the wiggle back in dead bait fish
Portland Press Herald - Monday, October 23, 2017 

A Maine inventor is making a splash in the big-game fishing community with a mechanical lure that brings bait fish back from the dead. The product, appropriately named Zombait, is a hinged tube with a battery-powered motor inside that can be stuffed down the throat of dead bait to make it wiggle back and forth, simulating the swimming motion of a live fish. The idea is to trick big fish into thinking they’re going after live prey. Zombait is the brain child of entrepreneur and veteran tuna fisherman Rink Varian, who lives in Phippsburg.
Pipeline lawsuit divides candidates for District 2 council seat in South Portland
Portland Press Herald - Monday, October 23, 2017 

The city’s ongoing federal court battle with the Portland Pipe Line Corp. over a crude oil export ban is a defining issue in the two-way race for the District 2 City Council seat on Nov. 7. Christopher Breen and Kate Lewis are competing for a seat. Breen and Lewis have vastly different views of the so-called Clear Skies ordinance, which banned oil exports from South Portland’s waterfront and effectively blocked the pipeline company from reversing its flow to bring Canadian crude to its terminals on Portland Harbor. Breen said he opposes the Clear Skies ordinance and the money that’s being spent to defend it. Lewis called the Clear Skies ordinance a “strong product of work” that deserves the city’s best defense against the pipeline company’s lawsuit.
Engine failure dimmed hopes of blockbuster season for Maine-Nova Scotia ferry
Portland Press Herald - Monday, October 23, 2017 

The Portland-Nova Scotia ferry carried more passengers in 2017 than it did the year before, but an engine failure disrupted its sailing schedule and dimmed expectations of a blockbuster season. The Cat ferry carried 41,463 passengers from Portland to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, between the end of May and Oct. 15, a 17 percent increase from the 35,500 passengers who took the ferry in 2016. Mark MacDonald, CEO of Bay Ferries, the Prince Edward Island-based company that operates the high-speed catamaran, said, “Based on our passenger bookings as they stood at that time, we were projecting to double our traffic this year over last year." Because of the engine failure, the ferry had to run at much slower speeds and cancel almost 25 percent of its sailing days.
Letter: Pingree, Poliquin should join climate caucus
Morning Sentinel - Monday, October 23, 2017 

The Earth is warming. What can be argued is how much of this warming is due to natural earth cycles and how much is due to the effects of humans. But this doesn’t really matter. We do not know how to change the natural earth cycles, but we can reduce the impact on global warming that is caused by our high-carbon lifestyle. One of the most effective ways to reduce carbon dioxide production is through the marketplace with a bipartisan program called carbon fee and dividend. Please encourage your legislator, Reps. Chellie Pingree or Bruce Poliquin, to join the 50-plus legislators in the caucus and work with them to reduce global warming. ~ Paul Forman, Albion
Letter: Collins a clean energy champion
Bangor Daily News - Monday, October 23, 2017 

Maine has been a champion and the largest producer of renewable energy so it should be no surprise that Sen. Susan Collins has been chosen as a Clean Energy Champion because of her being a relentless advocate for clean energy over the years. She co-sponsored the Incentivizing Offshore Wind Power Act, which proposed to create an investment tax credit for offshore wind facilities. She supported the Bureau of Land Management’s methane recapture rule. She was a lead sponsor of an amendment to increase federal energy research and development investments, and to support efforts to preserve our air and climate. ~ Heather Reams, Citizens for Responsible Energy Solutions, Washington, D.C.
Months of little rain put Maine woods at high risk for wildfires
Portland Press Herald - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

There is a high risk for wildfires across more than half of Maine after months with little rain, according to the Maine Forest Service. The service’s Wildfire Danger Report, based on the National Fire Danger Rating System, says the current wildfire risk is “high” across southern and central Maine and as far north as Jackman to the west and Houlton to the east. Several brush fires were reported Sunday in Hancock County.
The Acadia Wildlife Center Open House
WABI-TV5 - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

The Acadia Wildlife Center hosted an open house for folks to check out the some of its wildlife, but one animal sparked the most attention. Ann Rivers has been the director of Acadia Wildlife center for over 20 years. She says bats are often misunderstood, "A lot of people don't like what they don't know anything about. People are worried that bats are all rabid, that they're dirty, that they're in their attics, and that they're gonna spread disease. So, there are a lot of myths about them, and basically the myths are all untrue." Although some people may not like bats, according to Rivers, they play a big role in the state's ecosystem.
Pollution kills 9 million a year, costs $4.6 trillion, study finds
Associated Press - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Environmental pollution — from filthy air to contaminated water — is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. More than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. One out of every six premature deaths in the world in 2015 — about 9 million — could be attributed to disease from toxic exposure, according to a major study released Thursday. The financial cost from pollution-related death, sickness and welfare is equally massive, the report says, costing some $4.6 trillion in annual losses — or about 6.2 percent of the global economy.
Maine university getting more than $1 million for seaweed-to-energy
Associated Press - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

A Maine university is receiving more than $1.3 million from the federal government to develop methods for the U.S. to become a leader at utilizing seaweed for uses such as energy. The U.S. Department of Energy is giving the money to the University of New England over three years. The award is part of a program called Macroalgae Research Inspiring Novel Energy Resources, or “MARINER.” The university says the program aims to develop tools to enable the U.S. to become a leading producer of seaweed to help with energy security and economic competitiveness.
Why curing sick bats makes Maine a healthier place
Bangor Daily News - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Bats are often thought of as scary, dirty and disease-ridden, but they are lovely and fascinating to Ann Rivers. The 62-year-old Rivers runs Acadia Wildlife Center, one of two full-time state-licensed facilities in Maine that rehabilitates many kinds of wild animal but specializes in saving bats. She nurses about 50 ailing bats annually brought to her by game wardens and anybody else who finds them. The rehabilitation is an important part of maintaining a vital species, she said.
When Maine burned: How the monster Fire of ’47 tested the state’s resilience and altered its landscape
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

The walls of flames roared like tornadoes or locomotives across Maine’s wooded hillsides, devastating communities with a ferocity that didn’t distinguish between waterfront mansions or humble farmsteads. By the time rains finally fell on Oct. 29 – weeks after flames began popping up across the drought-stricken state – the fires had burned more than 200,000 acres, destroyed nearly 900 year-round homes, 400 seasonal houses and left an estimated 2,500 people homeless.
Possibility of another monster wildfire may not be as unlikely as you think
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Experts say a fire on the scale of the 1947 conflagration is less likely, given the improvements in communications, monitoring and firefighting equipment in Maine during the past 70 years. Maine’s wet climate, ecologically diverse forests and topography are different from that of many western states where massive spring- and summertime forest fires have unfortunately become the norm. Yet the late-fall fires near the Great Smoky Mountains in 2016 – which killed 14 and caused an estimated $500 million in damage in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, alone – underscored that large-scale, destructive forest fires are not merely a western problem.
You’re the boss when greening your home office
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Here's how to conserve energy, paper and fuel, then recycle your equipment when its useful life is done.
New book encourages you to record your own observations of nature
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

“The Naturalist’s Notebook,” written by two superb Maine naturalists, is an all-around pleasure. The attractively designed volume combines practical guidance, lucid prose, and precise and charming illustrations with a systematic path to seeing and understanding the natural world more deeply. The illustrations are by Bernd Heinrich, who is one of the writers as well as an emeritus professor of biology at the University of Vermont. His co-author is Nathaniel Wheelwright, a Bowdoin professor of natural sciences.
Forest bathing catching on around coastal Maine
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Forest bathing – the practice of walking slowly through the woods to benefit from nature – came to Maine in the last year, but the certified guides who offer this therapy believe it will explode, much like yoga. Forest therapy involves meditative exercises interspersed through a three-hour slow walk through the woods. Every 20 or 30 minutes the guide suggests a new exercise, then to provide the opportunity to observe the forest and consider their thoughts or simply the tranquility in nature. Then the group convenes in a council to share what they learned.
Column: A carnivore tries to figure out how to cut down on her meat consumption
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

I’m not giving up meat, but I am cutting back on the amount of meat I serve to my family. To be clear, it’s still an everyday thing. Ounce for ounce, there is just less of it. I’m shooting for half, to be exact. In my slow but steady progression to present meat as a flavorful condiment to vegetable-forward entrees, I am always on the lookout for cuts of meat flavorful enough and cooking techniques simple enough to easily push my reducetarian agenda forward. This week I’m working on shanks. ~ Christine Burns Rudalevige
Column: Deer season approaches and decisions must be made
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

This coming Saturday marks the opening of deer season, the day most Maine hunters look forward to with great anticipation. And if the number of any-deer permits given out this year is any indication, there should be a bumper crop of deer ready for harvest. Whatever your personal motivation is for heading afield this Saturday, remember it may be different, possibly quite different from others you encounter. Respect them. Enjoy your time and let them enjoy theirs, and above all be safe. Good luck. ~ Bob Humphrey
Opinion: The last thank-you note for salmon?
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Maine’s identity and its economy rely on preserving natural treasures. Salmon fishing used to contribute millions of dollars to Maine’s economy. The last salmon season drew fishers from around the world. Salmon were once so plentiful in the Penobscot that, legends go, you could walk across the river on the backs of the fish. For Maine to ever see another Atlantic salmon fishing season again, the Endangered Species Act must be left alone or strengthened, not weakened. ~ Dan Tandy of Mount Desert Island was a National Park Service ranger in Alaska and has been a business owner in Bangor for more than 30 years
Letter: Senators should defend National Refuge in Alaska
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

I write to urge Sens. Susan Collins and Angus King to defend against oil exploration and drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a region that is home to over 200 species of birds, 37 species of land mammals, 25 species of fish and eight marine mammals along its coast. Drilling for oil in this region would provide a very limited benefit (virtually none of which will be seen by Mainers) with all the risks attendant to oil drilling. Then consider the downstream effects of pulling yet more hydrocarbons from below the Earth’s surface and spewing them into the atmosphere as global warming pollutants. ~ Claudia King, Portland
Colby volunteers, others haul discarded items away from Waterville’s South End
Morning Sentinel - Saturday, October 21, 2017 

The rubbish collection, financed by Colby College, was intended to help the neighborhod and get students more involved with the community in which they go to school.
EXCLUSIVE: Radical Mainers pressure Trump to kill Katahdin Woods & Waters National Monument
Maine Environmental News - Saturday, October 21, 2017 

On Wednesday, a group of more than three-dozen extreme far-right organizations, trade associations, businesses, former public officials and current lawmakers sent a letter urging that President Donald Trump rescind four national monuments, including Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument and Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument. Among the Mainers signing the letter are Stuart Kallgren of the Maine Woods Coalition, Jimmy Busque of the Fin & Feather Club, Mary Adams of the Maine Center-right Coalition, Victoria Bucklin of the Maine Chapter of U.S. Parents Involved in Education, Penny Morrell of Concerned Women for America of Maine, and Gordon Colby of Allen's Union Farms Blueberry Freezer.
Community rallies for Maine farmer after he gets a concussion from his cow
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, October 21, 2017 

Six weeks ago, New Vineyard dairy farmers Randall and Jill Bates were trying to get a cow out of the barn and into a trailer when the 1,400 pound cow pulled on the rope and Randall went down hard. The cow’s head hit his face and he hit the concrete, smacking the ground with the back of his head. Randall had suffered a concussion and small brain hemorrhage as well as a the multiple facial fractures. His recovery would take months. Rick Kersbergen, a University of Maine Cooperative Extension professor and the education coordinator for the Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship program at Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture and the Environment in Freeport. He knew there were five apprentices working on the two-year training program there, and thought that some of them would be more than willing to go to New Vineyard and lend a hand.
Scarborough Land trust names new executive director
Scarborough Leader - Friday, October 20, 2017 

Rich Bard, the new executive director of the Scarborough Land Trust has been working in land conservation and wildlife for more than 20 years and now will be tasked with helping to preserve Scarborough’s scenic beauty. Bard will replace Kathy Mills, who served as the trust’s executive director for five years before resigning in July to take the position of director and advancement officer for the Maine Farmland Trust.
Wild blueberry milk coming from Oakhurst in the spring
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 20, 2017 

Oakhurst Dairy plans to introduce a wild Maine blueberry milk this spring, and based on the response the announcement got on social media, there will be some eager customers. Smiling Hill Farm in Westbrook already makes a blueberry milk. If the new flavor is a hit, that would be good news for wild blueberry growers in Maine. Blueberry farmers continue to increase the yield from the state’s 44,000 acres of blueberry fields.
Maine Warden Service seeking person who mortally wounded bald eagle
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 20, 2017 

The Maine Warden Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of a person who mortally injured a young bald eagle in a remote corner of Penobscot County northeast of Baxter State Park. The juvenile eagle was discovered badly wounded on the Whitehorse Road in T7-R7 WELS on the afternoon of Oct. 13. It had to be euthanized. Officials say it was shot with a shotgun.
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