August 24, 2019  
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Maine Environmental News
Action Alert - Friday, August 23, 2019 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond; hey, we're all connected). We have posted summaries and links to 60,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Rangeley Outdoor Film Festival, Aug 30
Event - Posted - Friday, August 23, 2019 

The Rangeley Trail Town Festival features a variety of short films about the outdoors. At RFA Lakeside Theater, Rangeley, August 30, 7 pm, $6 for adults, $3 for Appalachian Trail hikers and children under 12.
LightHawk Paper Plane Contest
Announcement - Thursday, August 22, 2019 

Enter your best paper airplane design for a chance to have it mailed to thousands in LightHawk's 2019 Holiday Letter. Deadline: October 18, 2019.
BTLT Seeks Community Input on Future Conservation
Announcement - Tuesday, August 20, 2019 

The Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust is seeking community input on its current and future conservation work in Brunswick, Topsham, and Bowdoin. A community survey is available online until September 2.
Butler to speak on conservation, Aug 27
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 20, 2019 

Conservationist Gil Butler will discuss his efforts to establish outdoor education programs and conservation projects in Maine and throughout North and South America. At College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, August 27, 9 am, free, parking on campus is by permit only.
Solo Paddle of Northern Forest Canoe Trail, Aug 27
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 20, 2019 

Laurie Apgar Chandler will read from and discuss her book “Upwards,” which tells her story as the first woman to solo paddle New England’s 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail. At Bailey Library, Winthrop, August 27, 6:30 pm.
Keeping Acadia Healthy With New Science, Aug 26
Event - Posted - Monday, August 19, 2019 

Abraham Miller-Rushing and Rebecca Cole-Will will discuss how Acadia National Park is facing a triple environmental challenge: global warming, acid rain, and increased visitation. At Bar Harbor, August 26, 5 pm.
Maine’s Seaweed Scene, Sep 26
Event - Posted - Monday, August 19, 2019 

Susan Hand Shetterly and Robin Hadlock Seeley will discuss the importance of protected wild habitats and the critical role of seaweed in the Gulf of Maine. At Moore Community Center, Ellsworth, September 26, 7 pm. Hosted by Downeast Audubon.
Bee apocalypse
Action Alert - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

U.S. agriculture today is 48 times more toxic to honeybees than it was 25 years ago—almost entirely because of neonicotinoid pesticides. It's part of an "insect apocalypse." But instead of taking action, the Trump administration is shredding protections for bees. Will you stand with me in the fight to save the bees? ~ Mayor Ethan Strimling, Portland, Maine
Maine Farmland Trust Gallery 20th Anniversary Retrospective Exhibit, thru Oct 11
Announcement - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

To celebrate Maine Farmland Trust’s 20th anniversary, a curated retrospective featuring a selection of works that have been exhibited at the MFT Gallery over the past 10 years is on view through October 11.
National Parks Free Entrance, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

All National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer free admission to everyone to celebrate the National Park Service's 103rd birthday on August 25.
Brechlin reading, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

Earl Brechlin, a Registered Maine Guide, will read from his book, "Return to Moose River: In Search of the Spirit of the Great North Woods," essays describing white-water canoeing, snowmobiling, and backpacking adventures in many parts of Maine. At Albert Church Brown Memorial Library, China, August 25, 2 pm.
Kennebec Land Trust annual meeting, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 18, 2019 

At Camp Androscoggin, Wayne, August 25. The trust has conserved more than 6,300 acres and constructed 44 miles of trails on KLT protected lands.
Maine Herpetological Society Reptile Expo, Aug 25
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 17, 2019 

50+ vendors, 1,000+ reptiles, plus Mr. Drew and His Animals Too. At Ramada Inn, Lewiston, August 25, 10 am - 4 pm, $7, kids under 12 free.
Families in the Outdoors, Aug 24
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 17, 2019 

Learn about all kinds of Maine bugs – the good, the bad and the very strange looking. At Law Farm, Dover-Foxcroft, August 24, 9 am - noon.
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News Items
Seal rescued after it gets stranded on Ellsworth roadway Watch a baby seal who was stranded in Ellsworth
Bangor Daily News - Friday, January 25, 2019 

Maine Marine Patrol responded to Bayside Road in Ellsworth after getting a call Friday morning that the seal was near Spindle Road. Sgt. Troy Dow of the Marine Patrol said the seal appeared to be in good health. Heavy rains on Thursday may have raised water levels in a nearby brook, Dow said, which the seal could have used to make its way to the road. The road runs parallel to the shore of Union River Bay, a few hundred feet to the east. Allied Whale will monitor the area to make sure the seal does not become stranded again.
Bob Mallard: Conservationist, Author, Mainer, Fishing Guide
Other - Friday, January 25, 2019 

Fly Life Magazine - Bob Mallard is from Maine and no one gets to tell him what to think, what to say or what to believe. You may not always like what he has to say or his opinion on any particular part of a subject, but his positions seem never to be built on political expediency, bribery, lies, alternate reality, nor are they Twitter triggered late at night, and he means what he says.
Column: Winter duck-watching needn’t be a frigid affair
Bangor Daily News - Friday, January 25, 2019 

Ocean duck-watching in winter does not have to be a frigid affair. It can often be done from a heated car. Here are two species, buffleheads and long-tailed ducks, that are frequently found close to shore. Since they are common, perhaps they are underappreciated. ~ Bob Duchesne
Beavers have been jamming snow gun pipes at a midcoast ski area
Bangor Daily News - Friday, January 25, 2019 

Snowmakers at the Camden Snow Bowl have to deal with a complicating factor: beavers. The water used for making snow at the Snow Bowl comes from Hosmer Pond, located at the base of Ragged Mountain. The beavers that call the pond home have taken to damming up the intake pipe that brings water to the ski area’s snowmaking guns, delaying the process until the pipe can be cleared. This season, the Snow Bowl has enlisted a diver to remove the beavers’ handiwork every time the snowmaking process is about to start. While Ward said the beavers are still trying their best to clog the pipe, preempting the delay in the process by hiring a diver has made for much smoother snowmaking.
A small fish makes a big comeback, and why Atlantic salmon may be next
Bangor Daily News - Friday, January 25, 2019 

A pair of news items that mean good things for Maine fish and fisheries: News item 1: The Downeast Salmon Federation reported that just months after a dam on Smelt Brook in the town of Sullivan, tomcod had been detected swimming — and spawning — upstream of the dam site. It was the first time in more than 50 years that the small fish had been able to swim freely that far upstream. News item 2: The Atlantic Salmon Federation released a report on Atlantic salmon harvest by Greenland fishermen, and that total — reduced as a result of an agreement between the fishermen’s union and conservation groups — was encouraging.
The last fisherman?
Working Waterfront - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

When it comes to the working waterfront, there always seems to be someone with a big idea that doesn’t quite fit with existing ordinances and practices. Recently, a pair of hotel proposals had residents of Boothbay Harbor and Portland wrestling with the endless challenge of trying to balance the interests of those who need to be on the waterfront with those who just want to be. Boothbay Harbor is a tourist town and Portland is a trendy little city. In Boothbay Harbor, they are buying piers surrounded by hotels to make sure fishermen have the water access they need. In Portland, they are using zoning regulations to prevent hotels and condominiums from displacing fishing boats. What both town and city are preserving when they seek to protect working waterfront is a little bit of the authenticity that makes them attractive in the first place.
Augusta plastic bag fee proposal might be sacked
Kennebec Journal - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

A majority of city councilors at Thursday’s meeting said they would not support a proposal to require stores in the city to charge 5 cents per bag for plastic shopping bags. But Ward 1 Councilor Linda Conti, who asked for the proposal, said she still plans to bring it forward in an effort to reduce the amount of plastic going into the local waste stream.
Editorial: Allowing sprawling development would hurt towns, wildlife and wilderness
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

The Land Use Planning Commission's proposal to change the so-called adjacency rule would open 1.3 million acres in northern Maine to development. The commission has presented little evidence that the adjacency rule is a hindrance to development in the unorganized territories. Some land owners and developers have long complained that the commission is too strict and hampers the growth of second homes and camps, but there is little evidence that this is true. Without a strong rationale for the proposed changes, and with so much public concern about the proposed changes and their consequences, the commission should set them aside.
Boothbay Harbor motel purchase aims to preserve working waterfront
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

A nonprofit group formed to protect public access to the water announced Thursday that it has signed a purchase-and-sale agreement to buy Cap’n Fish Motel on the east side of Boothbay Harbor. The property, combined with the adjacent Sea Pier property recently purchased by another nonprofit, makes Ken Fitch, president of the Stewards of Boothbay Harbor — soon to be renamed Boothbay Harbor Waterfront Preservation — confident that public access to the water and the working waterfront will be preserved despite increasing development pressures.
Dueling bills could expand bear hunting in Maine
Associated Press - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

Bear hunting is one of Maine’s oldest traditions, and residents might be able to do more of it in the future — but not before some claws come out in the Maine State House. Hunters and animal welfare activists are preparing for a spat over a pair of bills that could potentially expand the bear hunt. Maine has the largest population of black bears on the East Coast, and the population is growing swiftly, leading hunting groups to lobby for longer seasons and looser restrictions.
Big consumer brands will start taking their packaging back
Bloomberg News - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

In the environmentalist mantra “reduce, reuse, recycle,” almost all of the attention has been paid to recycling. Now some of the world’s biggest consumer brands are trying to shift the focus to the second R, with a program that provides products in reusable containers that can be returned for a refund. The durable packaging program, called “Loop” — a reference to a theoretical circular economy where nothing is wasted — debuted at the World Economic Forum in Davos Thursday. Led by New Jersey-based recycling company TerraCycle, Loop will offer popular products from about 25 companies in reusable containers that customers order online or purchase in stores and return to the company when finished.
What JD Irving’s 3-year hiring plan means for Maine
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

Canadian conglomerate J.D. Irving Ltd. plans to hire 10,000 workers between now and 2021, 300 of them in Maine. Most of the Maine jobs will be split between its Ashland and Dixfield saw mills and its woodland operations. J.D. Irving has been operating in Aroostook County for more than 70 years.
Fermentation company buys Maine farm to preserve farmland
Lincoln County News - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

The family behind Thirty Acre Farm of Whitefield hopes to buy a property on Route 32 in Bremen, transform the property into its headquarters and ensure it remains farmland forever. The Bremen Planning Board approved Thirty Acre Farm’s application to renovate a barn, build a new barn and build a greenhouse. The company makes certified organic lacto-fermented products, including sauerkraut, according to its website. If the relocation is successful, the plan is to utilize 10 acres of the Bremen property for farming and to use the greenhouse to produce the business’s products. The farm would grow cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables on the property.
Great interview with former DIFW Commissioner Chandler Woodcock
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

Scott Milewski of Augusta has started a great website with podcasts of interviews with Mainers throughout the state. One of his recent podcasts is with former DIFW Commissioner Chandler Woodcock. They do talk about Chan’s experiences at DIFW, but a lot of the conversation ranges from his childhood to his many grandchildren.
Thanks to the togue derby, Moosehead’s fishery is finally back in balance
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

The Moosehead Lake Togue Derby with Ricky Craven, which will be held for the 12th time Friday through Sunday, was begun as part of an initiative undertaken by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. There were simply too many lake trout, also called togue, in Moosehead Lake. “We had three years of that regulation, and we took out about 80,000 of those little togue over those three years [winter and summer]. And then another 10,000 or 15,000 of the lake trout that were over 18,” said Tim Obrey, a state fisheries biologist. “That really was what turned things around for Moosehead.”
3 years after closing, Hancock seafood firm’s efforts to reopen stymied by federal shutdown
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

A seafood business in Hancock was within days of getting federal approval to resume processing and selling smoked fish when the government shutdown went into effect in late December. Now, five weeks later, Leslie Harlow is in a holding pattern, waiting to find out when she can call her five employees in to work at the business, Sullivan Harbor Farm.
Judge bans Maine farmer from raising livestock for life
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

A court order has put a Sorrento resident out of the livestock business for life after the state seized 105 animals from his farm earlier this month. Staff from the state Animal Welfare Program brought the 75 chickens, 10 ducks, 15 rabbits and five pigs to shelters for treatment after they found them in filthy conditions at a farm owned by 53-year-old Marc Calcia. Superior Court Justice Bruce Mallonee ordered the ban, saying that Calcia had violated an April 2018 deferred disposition agreement that required him to clean up the animals’ living conditions.
Column: Janet Mills’ Maine makeover
Times Record - Thursday, January 24, 2019 

Being adamantly anti-environment apparently brought little to the table in improving Maine’s business environment. Thankfully, former Gov. LePage proved unable to perform as a purveyor of what’s all too often an exploitative, almost always environmentally detrimental, so-called economic development. Instead of shooting Maine in the foot out of political spite, Janet Mills promises to administer an environmental equivalent to Narcan has soon as possible by encouraging any and all sustainable energy development. Maine’s new blue wave is far more promising than the unimaginative backward-looking vision of LePage’s ultimately bankrupt governance. ~ Gary Anderson, Bath
The rare hawk rescued during a Maine snowstorm may lose a toe
Bangor Daily News - Wednesday, January 23, 2019 

A great black hawk pulled from the clutches of a frozen death in Portland is hungrily eating mouse medallions and seems to be well on the road to recovery, officials at Avian Haven in Freedom said Wednesday. The out-of-place tropical bird, a feathered celebrity in Maine since it landed here last August, may only lose part of one toe. The great black hawk was taken to the wild bird rehabilitation center after being rescued on Sunday from Deering Oaks Park in Portland.
Maine State Parks saw 11 percent increase in visitors last year, strive for 3 million visitors
Times Record - Wednesday, January 23, 2019 

It was a banner year for visiting Maine’s State Parks, which saw nearly 3 million visitors across the 48 parks — an 11 percent increase statewide from 2017. Pownal’s Bradbury Mountain State Park, experienced a 33 percent increase in visitors, one of the highest in the state, just behind Sebago Lake and Lily Bay, which had the largest increase at 43 percent.
UPDATED: Study says sea level rise is costing Bath homeowners
Times Record - Wednesday, January 23, 2019 

A new study claims that sea level rise has cost Maine homeowners just shy of $70 million in unrealized home value since 2005. Bath has been the hardest hit community, with $4.1 million in unrealized value, the study finds. If nothing changes, researchers expect the community to miss out on another $4.7 million over the next 15 years.
Shutdown Makes It Tough For Groups To Help Endangered Whales
Associated Press - Wednesday, January 23, 2019 

Rescuers who respond to distressed whales and other marine animals say the federal government shutdown is making it more difficult to do their work. A network of rescue groups in the U.S. works with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to respond to marine mammals such as whales and seals when the animals are in trouble, such as when they are stranded or entangled in fishing gear. But the federal shutdown, which is entering its 33rd day on Wednesday, includes a shuttering of the NOAA operations the rescuers rely upon.
Why a report from Greenland signals ‘great news’ for wild salmon in Maine
Bangor Daily News - Wednesday, January 23, 2019 

Conservationists on Wednesday heralded the announcement that Greenland’s commercial catch of wild Atlantic salmon had hit a 13-year low and suggested that harvest could mean better returns on North American rivers where the fish spawn. The Atlantic Salmon Federation says the result indicates a successful first year of a new 12-year salmon conservation agreement, which recently was signed by the union representing Greenland commercial fishermen, the federation and the North Atlantic Salmon Fund. The agreement calls on Greenland fishermen to reduce their catch of wild salmon in exchange for assistance developing alternate sources of income and support for marine research and conservation projects.
Why a report from Greenland signals ‘great news’ for wild salmon in Maine
Bangor Daily News - Wednesday, January 23, 2019 

Conservationists on Wednesday heralded the announcement that Greenland’s commercial catch of wild Atlantic salmon had hit a 13-year low and suggested that harvest could mean better returns on North American rivers where the fish spawn. The Atlantic Salmon Federation says the result indicates a successful first year of a new 12-year salmon conservation agreement, which recently was signed by the union representing Greenland commercial fishermen, the federation and the North Atlantic Salmon Fund. The agreement calls on Greenland fishermen to reduce their catch of wild salmon in exchange for assistance developing alternate sources of income and support for marine research and conservation projects.
The world is watching while Maine argues over coastal development
Bangor Daily News - Wednesday, January 23, 2019 

Proponents of developments along Maine’s coast — most notably a proposed land-based salmon farm in Belfast — suggest that a culture of development phobia has settled in, creating the sense that coastal communities are “anti-business.” In midcoast Maine, there is a strong tradition of locals pushing back and sometimes beating outside development efforts. Penobscot Bay pilot David Gelinas says, “I don’t mind anybody questioning safety, or environmental impact. Proposals need to go through a rigorous review. But it seems to me what’s happening is that the legal system and the public review system are being used as a tool to cudgel a project to death.”
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