March 20, 2018  
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Maine Environmental News
Announcement - Tuesday, March 20, 2018 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to Maine conservation and natural resource news and events. We have posted summaries and links to over 50,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Four-Season Gardening, Mar 27
Event - Posted - Tuesday, March 20, 2018 

Learn from the UMaine Cooperative Extension how to enjoy our gardens all year round. At Curtis Library, Brunswick, March 27, 12 pm.
Help wanted: Organizing Director
Announcement - Monday, March 19, 2018 

Maine Conservation Voters/Maine Conservation Alliance, two statewide, nonpartisan, nonprofit organizations, are seeking a shared full-time Organizing Director to build and manage grassroots organizing and field programs.
How to Participate in the Maine Bird Atlas, Mar 26
Event - Posted - Monday, March 19, 2018 

Rich MacDonald will talk about the history of the Maine Bird Atlas and how you can participate. At Blue Hill Library, March 26, 7 pm. Sponsored by Downeast Chapter of Maine Audubon.
Growing More Crops in Less Space, Mar 25
Event - Posted - Sunday, March 18, 2018 

Workshop leader Will Bonsai is director of the Scattered Project. He is best known for his work in preserving crop diversity. At St. Paul's Church, Brunswick, March 25, 2-3:30 pm, $5 donation. Sponsored by Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust.
Maine Adaptive Sports & Recreation Ski-A-Thon, Mar 24
Event - Posted - Saturday, March 17, 2018 

Maine Adaptive Sports & Recreation promotes year-round education and training for individuals with disabilities to develop skills, enhance independence, and provide enjoyment through active recreation. In addition to being an excellent fundraiser, the Ski-A-Thon is a ton of fun. Fundraising goal: $380,000.
Stand up for Federal Bird Conservation Funding
Action Alert - Saturday, March 17, 2018 

The proposed federal budget would gut major programs and protections for birds and their habitats. One-third of migratory bird species have already lost significant populations as threats to wildlife increase. Tell your U.S. Senators and U.S. Representative to make protecting migratory birds a priority in the federal budget. ~ American Bird Conservancy
Earth Hour, Mar 24
Event - Posted - Saturday, March 17, 2018 

Join millions of people around the world—along with businesses, cities, and landmarks—who will turn off lights in celebration of Earth Hour. March 24, from 8:30 - 9:30 am local time.
Lessons from Avian Haven, Mar 23
Event - Posted - Friday, March 16, 2018 

Laura Suomi-Lecker will discuss Avian Haven in Freedom, which was established in 1999 as a bird rehabilitation center dedicated to the return of injured and orphaned wild birds of all species to their natural environment. In 2017, they admitted over 2,500 birds from all over the state with varying degrees of injuries or illnesses. At Blue Hill Library, March 23, 7 pm. Sponsored by Downeast Chapter of Maine Audubon.
Solar Energy for ME, Mar 23
Event - Posted - Friday, March 16, 2018 

Dylan Voorhees, Climate & Clean Energy Director for the Natural Resource Council of Maine, and Rep. Seth Berry, House Chair of the Maine Legislature's Committee on Energy, Utilities and Technology, discuss expanding solar energy in Maine. At Curtis Library, Brunswick, March 23, 7 pm. Sponsored by Friends of Merrymeeting Bay.
Resist Mike Pompeo’s confirmation as Secretary of State
Action Alert - Thursday, March 15, 2018 

Trump just fired Rex Tillerson, one of the few people left in his cabinet who was willing to speak out against Vladimir Putin. But even more egregious is that Trump nominated Mike Pompeo, a xenophobic, pro-torture, climate-denying war hawk, to replace Tillerson.
Protect Maine from EPA budget cuts
Action Alert - Monday, March 12, 2018 

There have been more than 90 of harmful amendments proposed that undermine federal safeguards to everything we rely on the EPA to protect: our air, water, climate, and wildlife.
Ask Congress to Oppose Anti-wolf Riders
Action Alert - Monday, March 12, 2018 

Congress will likely vote in the next two weeks on a 2018 spending bill for the Department of Interior. Because that legislation is likely to be broadly supported, anti-wolf legislators are using it as a vehicle to try to pass their otherwise unpopular attacks on wildlife. Email your senator or representative and ask that they persuade Leadership to strip these "riders" prior to the bill being voted on. ~ Endangered Species Coalition
What’s a woodlot and what do I do if I have one? Mar 19
Event - Posted - Monday, March 12, 2018 

Morten Moesswilde, District Forester with the Maine Forest Service, will talk about the most common considerations for landowners with 2 to 200 acres. At Belfast Library, March 19, 6 pm.
Powering Change: Saving Our Environment—and Saving Money, Mar 19
Event - Posted - Monday, March 12, 2018 

Panelists: Sophie Janeway, Climate and Clean Energy Outreach Coordinator, Natural Resources Council of Maine; Gary Friedmann, President, A Climate to Thrive; and Martha Dickinson, Ellsworth Green Plan Steering Committee. At Moore Community Centre, Ellsworth, March 19, 7 pm. Hosted by Ellsworth Garden Club.
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News Items
Parks commission head on beach poop problem: ‘Dog owners are the NRA of Kittery’
Bangor Daily News - Wednesday, February 28, 2018 

Portsmouth Herald - The Kittery Town Council and the Parks Commission discussed requiring passes for dog owners to bring their canines to both Fort Foster and Seapoint Beach as a means of curbing dog waste. Monday night’s workshop on the town-owned park management plan quickly shifted to how to reduce the amount of dog waste in the parks. Parks Commission co-chair Paige Mead compared town dog owners’ steadfast commitment to keeping Fort Foster open for their pets to the lobbying efforts of the National Rifle Association.
Maine’s marine businesses are getting a $14 million infusion
Associated Press - Wednesday, February 28, 2018 

The Alliance for Maine’s Marine Economy is investing $7 million in voter-approved bonds along with more than $7 million more from its own members, according to the University of Maine, which oversees the group. The university said the investments are designed to “support and diversify traditional fisheries, aquaculture and other marine-dependent industries.”
Legislature Kills Bill to Lease Colonial Pemaquid to Nonprofit
Lincoln County News - Wednesday, February 28, 2018 

Although the Maine State Legislature will not pass a bill to authorize the lease of the Colonial Pemaquid State Historic Site to The Friends of Colonial Pemaquid, the leadership of the group will continue to pursue the lease. The nonprofit sees three major benefits a lease would provide the site and the local area: the creation of an “economic engine” for the peninsula, the development of a vibrant educational destination, and the revitalization of plans to build a replica 17th-century village. However, the bill received strong opposition from Tom Desjardin, director of the Bureau of Parks and Lands. Desjardin said the bill was “unnecessary,” as the bureau already allows private groups to manage state facilities, and the cost of operating the site is about $40,000, which “is not a sum that a nonprofit can reasonably raise annually for operating costs alone.”
Maine Fox Hunt Ending For The Winter On Wednesday
Associated Press - Wednesday, February 28, 2018 

Maine has a small but active group of hunters who pursue foxes. The season ends on Wednesday. There is no limit on the number of foxes a hunter can harvest during the season, which begins in October. There are a handful of clubs remaining in New England for traditional fox hunters who pursue the animals on horseback with hounds. Wednesday is also the last day of the season to pursue gray squirrels via falconry and to hunt snowshoe hares on Vinalhaven Island. Bobcat season ended on Feb. 21. The next major hunting season in Maine is the turkey hunt, which begins near the end of April..
Maine lobster fishing group to replace longtime leader
Bangor Daily News - Wednesday, February 28, 2018 

The largest commercial fishing industry group on the East Coast will elect a new leader this Friday for the first time in 27 years. Kristan Porter, a Cutler fisherman, is expected to take the reins of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association at the end of its annual meeting in Rockport. Porter, however, said it is “not a done deal” that he’ll become the group’s next president. Porter would take over for South Thomaston lobsterman David Cousens, who is stepping down as MLA president after having held the post since 1991.
Letter: Extra annual fee on electric cars is wrong way to fund highway repairs
Portland Press Herald - Wednesday, February 28, 2018 

The governor’s effort to tax electric cars avoids real solutions, attacks a growing industry and causes greater divisions within an already fractured government. This tax revenue would be a fraction of our transportation budget. Let’s raise the gas tax 20 to 60 cents per gallon and increase tolls for trucks. The bigger the gas guzzler (e.g., a sport utility vehicle), the more you pay. This “damage” tax could pay for our roads. Let’s put a portion of that revenue into clean and efficient rail transportation, including passenger and freight services, instead of turning our last veins of clean transportation into bike trails. How about converting a lane of the interstate and make that into the bike trail? These are ideas we should be considering. ~ Paul Weiss, Cumberland
Letter: Fifteen-cent bottle deposit works as litter deterrent, so let’s raise the 5-cent deposit
Portland Press Herald - Wednesday, February 28, 2018 

I own a property with a large amount of road frontage. Each month, I spend a good deal of time picking up dozens of discarded beer, hard cider and various other alcoholic beverage bottles and cans – as well as non-alcoholic ones (soda and water). I rarely, however, find discarded wine and liquor bottles. Could it be because the deposit on those beverages (15 cents) is three times the amount of the deposit for other beverages? If the current 15-cent deposit on liquor and wine bottles is reduced to 5 cents, Maine’s roadside litter will increase significantly. In a state that relies upon its natural beauty to attract tourism revenue, this does not make good policy. I agree that the deposit for all types of beverages should be made uniform: by increasing it to 15 cents on everything. ~ Lou Demers, North Yarmouth
Letter: 'No' to wind power projects
Sun Journal - Wednesday, February 28, 2018 

The rejection of Northern Pass by New Hampshire regulators puts CMP’s “clean energy connect” back on the front burner. Even though CMP has stated that their 145-mile line from Coburn Gore to Lewiston has nothing to do with wind power, it stretches credulity to not see a direct connection between Nextera’s 133-turbine project and that high voltage transmission line. Mainers cannot allow the scenic character of Route 27 be ruined. Maine does not need the power from 133 windmills, nor the power from Hydro Quebec facilitated by CMP’s transmission line. All the power from those assets will be shipped to southern New England and beyond, without a dime of rate relief for Maine customers. ~ Dudley Gray, Rangeley Plantation
Chandler Brothers gift 2,500 acres to Maine Woodland Owners
Sun Journal - Tuesday, February 27, 2018 

Chandler Brothers, a family-owned land management company whose New Gloucester roots herald back to the mid-1700s, made a difficult but necessary gift of 2,500 acres to Maine Woodland Owners Land Trust. “We knew we had to do something so the land wouldn’t be developed. That’s why we’re giving it away,” said spokesman Steve Chandler, representing four family owners. It’s an outright gift with no money exchanged, just the belief that land stewardship for the future will be upheld. The organization is the steward of 5,000 acres owned outright and 3,000 acres of easements.
Blog: Camp Directors Gather to Consider Diversity and Inclusion
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, February 15, 2018 

When close to 80 Maine camp directors gathered Tuesday in Portland to discuss diversity and inclusion, they were challenged to consider the impact of differences and division, and to seek to “create balance in an unbalanced world.” ~ Kristine Snow Millard
Man gets prison time for illegally harvesting Virginia eels
Associated Press - Monday, November 6, 2017 

A New York seafood dealer has been sentenced to 1 ½ years behind bars for illegally trafficking more than $150,000 worth of baby eels from Virginia. Tommy Zhou was sentenced Friday in a federal Virginia court after he pleaded guilty in April. Prosecutors say Zhou obtained a Maine elver dealer license in 2013 and then used it to cover his illegal operation.
Offshore Wind Farms See Promise in Platforms That Float
New York Times - Thursday, September 29, 2016 

The University of Maine is undertaking an elaborate physics experiment meant to simulate conditions that full-scale floating wind turbines could face at an installation being planned about 10 miles off the Maine coast in up to 360 feet of water near tiny Monhegan Island. For nearly 18 months in 2013 and 2014, an operating version of the apparatus — one-eighth of scale — sat in the waters off Castine sending electricity to the grid. That proved the technology fundamentally worked and guided refinements to the design. Now, the UMaine team is using the data collected at the lab to confirm the final form, a crucial next step in bringing the technology to market.
Blog: Singing is an act of territorialism for birds
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, April 7, 2016 

Birds don’t think about much, mostly just food and sex. Despite the simplicity of such a life, bird communication can be quite complex. Birds are renowned for their vocal abilities, but they use lots of visual cues, too. Perhaps nothing is more obvious than the crests sported by many species. ~ Bob Duchesne
Marco Rubio Finds Common Ground With Armed Militia In Oregon
Climate Progress - Thursday, January 7, 2016 

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio (R) doesn’t like that militants are currently occupying a federal wildlife facility in Oregon. But he does like the militia’s main idea: Seizing and selling off America’s public lands. Rubio explained his position on the controversial occupation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, now entering its fifth day. Rubio said that while he doesn’t support “lawless” activity, he does agree with the militia on its main point that federal public lands should be transferred to private ownership for activities like logging, coal mining, oil drilling, and farming. Rubio’s plan would essentially cause a free-for-all, where states can devastate national forests, parks, and other important wildlife and plantlife zones for temporary economic gain.
Editorial: Conflict over land preservation confirms where the public stands
Portland Press Herald - Wednesday, December 16, 2015 

If Gov. Paul LePage’s yearslong barricade of Land for Maine’s Future has proven anything, it’s how popular the conservation program is among a broad cross-section of the state. When the governor held hostage the voter-approved bonds that fund the program, residents from across the political divide responded with one voice, united in their support for an initiative that has protected more than 550,000 acres for a variety of economic and recreational uses. That response should make it clear that the focus should be on strengthening and tightening the program, not obstructing or trying to dismantle it, as LePage has done for most of his time in office. The governor, not corruption or mismanagement, is the program’s true problem.
Opinion: This is Bar Harbor’s chance to become a solar success and example
Bangor Daily News - Tuesday, May 19, 2015 

On June 2, Bar Harbor voters have an exciting opportunity to take a step toward putting the brakes on climate change. Article T on the town meeting agenda authorizes leasing town land and roofs as part of Community Solar Farms and Power Purchase Agreements for the purpose of providing power to the municipality. The change starts here and now. With our prominence as a popular tourist destination, Bar Harbor has an outsize influence on the rest of the state and the nation. By voting for this article we are saying that we care, that we can make a collective difference. ~ Gary Friedmann, Bar Harbor Town Council
Opinion: A new set of bold predictions
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, January 4, 2015 

In 2015, LePage will reduce the size of state government by 5 percent, he will succeed in further reducing municipal revenue sharing and he will change state law to permit municipalities to tax nonprofits. The Legislature will pass major welfare reform and reduce energy costs by welcoming in more natural gas and hydro. ~ Phil Harriman
Letter: Give deer the food they need and they will flourish
Kennebec Journal - Monday, April 28, 2014 

I read with interest the April 13 article about whitetail deer, “In northern Maine, deer herd shrinks despite efforts to rebuild it.” Anyone can look at Google satellite maps and know that very little of the Maine woods is untouched. The deer are being squeezed out of their natural habitat searching for food. They are vulnerable to predators and starvation because of the condition of the forest. The state cannot save the deer herd by pumping money into various programs. We just need to let some of the forest grow back, and the animals will survive on their own. ~ Betsy Laney, West Gardiner
Letter: Gubernatorial climate
Bangor Daily News - Tuesday, December 10, 2013 

As we approach the gubernatorial election year in Maine, and in light of the “interesting” comments made by our governor on Dec. 5 regarding the profit potential in climate change, I am reminded of the election that put such a person into office. From all early indications, LePage’s tea party supporters will hold about the same sway next November, and with Eliot Cutler again as a wild card in the race, the potential for Maine to have another four years with a governor who has squeaked into office with a minority of the state’s voters behind him is not small. We have had three years to try to correct this significant weakness in our election system, and yet we will be going to the polls in November 2014 faced with the same problem. This is unpardonable. ~ Dana Williams, Belfast
Fabulous Find assists Great Works land trust
Seacoast Online - Monday, October 28, 2013 

Fabulous Find thrift store in Kittery gave a boost to conservation recently with proceeds from September sales. Store staff presented a check for $4,332 to Great Works Regional Land Trust to assist the trust's conservation projects and ongoing operations.
Diehard Mainers take advantage of extended woodcock season
John Holyoke Out There Blog - Wednesday, October 10, 2012 

For years, Maine bird hunters in search of woodcock had just 30 days — generally the month of October — to do so. After years of study and discussion, that all changed in 2011. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service extended the woodcock season from 30 to 45 days.
Opinion: Save the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund
Other - Friday, July 22, 2011 

The U.S. House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee has passed a bill devastating the crown jewel conservation program for America's public lands and waters — the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Created in 1965 to offset the environmental risks from offshore oil and gas development, the conservation fund uses money from federal oil and gas leases to protect environmentally sensitive lands and watersheds. Over the years, the fund has paid for the expansion of national, state and local parks as well as conservation easements. All of this is accomplished without spending any federal tax dollars. President Obama's budget for 2012 provided $900 million for the fund. Regrettably, the bill passed by the subcommittee cuts the budget figure by more than 93 percent to the lowest funding level in the program's 45-year history.
Fort Williams home to threatened rabbit
Portland Press Herald - Friday, April 22, 2011 

Volunteers had an arboretum in mind as they cleared invasive plants from part of Fort Williams Park last fall. Little did they realize that their hard work would uncover evidence that the thick mass of plants was habitat for the endangered New England cottontail rabbit. The state Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife visited the site and confirmed that droppings were those of the New England cottontail. The rabbit was placed on Maine's list of threatened and endangered species in 2007 and is a candidate for protection under the federal Endangered Species Act. Officials from the town and the state are discussing what to do in response to the unintentional destruction of habitat.
Opinion: Amherst forest project to benefit people of Maine
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, April 10, 2010 

Just 20 miles east of Bangor, you can walk through deep forests, along bold ledges, streams and wetlands, and find your way to remote ponds named Half-Mile, Partridge, Indian Camp, Ducktail and Snowshoe. On a clear day, the view from Bald Bluff or Bald Mountain includes such landmarks as Cadillac Mountain and Mt. Katahdin. Thanks to more than six years of conservation planning led by the Forest Society of Maine and the town of Amherst, people of all ages will enjoy these places for generations to come.
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