November 18, 2017  
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Maine Environmental News
Announcement - Friday, November 17, 2017 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to Maine conservation and natural resource news and events. We have posted summaries and links to over 50,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Protecting the Nature of Maine Grants for Maine Middle Schools
Announcement - Friday, November 17, 2017 

The Natural Resources Council of Maine (NRCM) has eight $500 grants available to middle school teachers and club leaders (6th, 7th, or 8th grades) in Maine for projects that educate and engage students in Maine’s environment and the value of protecting it. Deadline is November 30.
Teddy Roosevelt Maine Conservation Award
Announcement - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 

The Teddy Roosevelt Maine Conservation Award given by Maine Woods Forever recognizes young people and youth organizations whose efforts are in the spirit of Roosevelt’s conservation ethic and achievements, and recognizes what Maine’s young people are doing to conserve our forest heritage, with an eye to their potential as future conservation leaders. Deadline for Nominations: January 31, 2018.
Block Trump's dangerous climate denier from the CEQ
Action Alert - Monday, November 13, 2017 

Kathleen Hartnett White, Trump's pick to lead the Council on Environmental Quality, isn't just your run-of-the-mill, extreme right-wing climate-denier. She's a senior fellow at the Koch brothers and Exxon-funded Texas Public Policy Foundation. She believes carbon dioxide is harmless "plant food," equates belief in climate change to "paganism," calls solar and wind power "unreliable and parasitic," and asserts that coal use in the 1800s ended slavery in the United States.
AMC Maine Chapter Annual Meeting, Nov 18
Event - Posted - Saturday, November 11, 2017 

Speakers: Steve Tatko, Appalachian Mountain Club’s Land Manager, will talk on the AMC’s Maine Woods Initiative. Jed Williamson will talk on Accidents in Outdoor Pursuits - Their Causes and Cures. At Portland, November 18.
Conserving Maine’s Bats: A Workshop for Woodland Owners, Foresters and Loggers, Nov 16
Event - Posted - Thursday, November 9, 2017 

Piscataquis County Soil & Water Conservation District, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, and Maine Department of Transportation, will hold a workshop on Maine bats. At Dover-Foxcroft Congregational Church, November 16, 9-10:30 am.
Nature Based Fiction & Truth, Nov 16
Event - Posted - Thursday, November 9, 2017 

Sandra Neily will discuss novel ways to elevate conservation, nature based economics as well as outdoor-themed fiction. She will sign and read from her novel, "Deadly Trespass." At Curtis Library, Brunswick, November 16, 7 pm. Hosted by Maine Appalachian Mt. Club.
Little Long Pond: A Field Guide to Four Seasons, Nov 16
Event - Posted - Thursday, November 9, 2017 

Author talk and book signing with Samuel Eliot and John Rivers. At Jesup Memorial Library, Bar Harbor, November 16, 7 pm.
Nature Based Fiction & Truth, Nov 15
Event - Posted - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 

Sandra Neily will discuss nature-based fiction as well as sign and read from her debut novel, "Deadly Trespass." At Shaw Memorial Library, Greenville, November 15, 6 pm.
Seeing the Future Forest Through the Trees: Potential Changes and Management Responses, Nov 15
Event - Posted - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 

Dr. Nicholas Fisichelli will discuss how can forest managers can respond to ongoing and projected changes. At UMaine at Machias, November 15, 6:30 pm.
Online sustainability journal ‘Spire’ invites submissions
Announcement - Tuesday, November 7, 2017 

Spire: The Maine Journal of Conservation and Sustainability invites submissions for the second issue of the online journal, slated for release in spring 2018. Deadline: Dec 10.
Oil Drilling Means Oil Spilling
Action Alert - Tuesday, November 7, 2017 

You still have time to stop the Trump Administration from paying for tax cuts to millionaires and billionaires by opening oil drilling in the Atlantic Ocean. Mainers have nothing to gain and everything to lose from this dangerous scheme. ~ Natural Resources Council of Maine
Maine Farmland Trust Annual Meeting, Nov 14
Event - Posted - Tuesday, November 7, 2017 

Speakers: Amber Lambke, Maine Grains; Rob Tod, Allagash Brewing Co.; and Sara Williams, Aurora Mills & Farm. At United Farmers Market Building, Belfast, November 14, 5:30-8 pm.
Mushing in Maine and Beyond, Nov 14
Event - Posted - Tuesday, November 7, 2017 

Polly Mahoney of Mahoosuc Guide Service will share her dogsledding experiences from the Yukon Territory to Maine to Nunavut and northern Quebec. She will bring a couple of her friendly sled dogs. At Bangor Public Library, November 14, 6 pm.
Baxter State Park sign auction, thru Dec 6
Announcement - Monday, November 6, 2017 

Auction of retired Baxter State Park signs, plus the historic dinner bell from Kidney Pond Camps. Friends Baxter State Park will donate half the proceeds to Baxter State Park, and half will support FBSP programs. Ends December 6.
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News Items
Study shows that right whales, already an endangered species, may face a dim future
Other - Monday, October 30, 2017 

When 15 North Atlantic right whales turned up dead in U.S. and Canadian waters in the summer of 2017, it was declared an unprecedented mass mortality event. For a highly endangered species with slightly more than 500 animals remaining, the crisis signals a major shift in the population's recovery. Of the seven whales necropsied, six deaths were caused by humans—four by ship strike, two by fishing gear entanglement—and one was inconclusive. Scientists also are puzzled by the location where most of the whale carcasses were discovered: Twelve were found in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, well north of the species' typical distributional range. Does climate play a role in this mystery?
CMP: More Power Outages Than In Ice Storm Of '98
Maine Public - Monday, October 30, 2017 

The winds that came through Maine overnight Sunday into Monday have disrupted power to more than 400,000 customers. That number is greater than the 1998 ice storm.
An Evening for the Environment: Celebrate the Conservation Victories of 2017
Maine Public - Monday, October 30, 2017 

Speaking in Maine takes us next to Portland for a recent talk sponsored by Maine Conservation Voters. The keynote speaker is Brian Deese, a Senior Advisor to former President Obama who oversaw climate, conservation, and energy policies and was one of the key architects of the Paris Climate Agreement.
Editorial: Trump’s park fee hike is suspect, but should spark needed debate
Bangor Daily News - Monday, October 30, 2017 

The Trump administration has proposed to increase weekly entrance fees at 17 parks, including Acadia National Park, from $25 to $70 per vehicle during the peak summer season. The revenue from the fee increases would be used to improve the parks. Given the Trump administration’s devaluing of public land, including national parks, the timing of the fee increase is suspect. That’s a shame because it will stall necessary debate over how best to manage these lands for the American public.
Two legislators recognized for their good work for conservation
Bangor Daily News - Monday, October 30, 2017 

The Nature Conservancy’s Corporate Conservation Council of Maine recognized two legislators for their conservation work at a recent event. The 57 members of the Council donated $341,658 this year to support TNC’s important conservation work in our state. And for the first time, the Council decided to give legislative awards. Awards were presented to House Speaker Sara Gideon and Senator Tom Saviello.
Letter: Hiding climate change
Bangor Daily News - Monday, October 30, 2017 

President Donald Trump continues to nominate people intent on destroying the agencies they represent. Kathleen Hartnett White has been nominated to head the Council on Environmental Quality. White has described climate change as “paganism for secular elites” and denies that CO2 is a pollutant — it’s “the gas of life on this planet.” Three scientists slated to appear at a symposium on the Narragansett Bay Estuary Program in Rhode Island were forbidden to appear. Along with the removal of climate information (paid for by us as taxpayers) from all government websites, this move by Scott Pruitt and Trump’s fossil fuel industry-run EPA is so blatant that it should have been headline news. Knowledge is power and this president wants to take that power away from us by dumbing us down. ~ Beverly Roxby, Belfast
Column: The moose hunt
Sun Journal - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

For many Maine moose hunters lucky enough to get drawn, a moose permit is a once-in-a-lifetime affair. Such was the case with my middle-aged friend Greg Goodman, who has been trying for that permit since he was a young man. Knowing that I had had some experience in the moose woods (and perhaps that I owned a big tent and a chain saw winch), Greg invited me along as his sub-permittee. ~ V. Paul Reynolds
No wild Atlantic salmon return to New Brunswick river
Associated Press - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

Atlantic salmon were once abundant in the rivers of New England and eastern Canada, but they’re now endangered or have disappeared in parts of both. The U.S.’s National Marine Fisheries Service is in the midst of reviewing the Gulf of Maine’s population, which is listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. About 900 wild salmon entered the Magaguadavic River to spawn in 1983, and the fact that none returned this year is bad news for the fish in Maine and Canada, said Neville Crabbe, spokesman for the Atlantic Salmon Federation.
Sturgeon not surging, but population slowly improves
Associated Press - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

The Atlantic sturgeon’s population remains depleted along the East Coast, but appears to be slowly recovering. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission says a stock assessment indicates the population is still very low compared to its historical abundance. But the commission also says the population has made some strides since the implementation of a complete fishing moratorium in 1998. The commission says the sturgeon still faces threats such as habitat loss, ship strikes, incidental fishing and climate change.
One Day Wanderers Club: keep calm and hike on
Daily Bulldog (Franklin County) - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

The Farmington Recreation Department has wrapped up its third year of hikes with their One Day Wanderers Club. O.D.W.C. is a hiking group for any outdoor enthusiast ages 50 and older. The club was created to provide a service that eliminates the danger of hiking alone while also allowing those who participate to socialize, exercise, and explore our beautiful state. In the last 3 years, the O.D.W.C. has taken over 50 members on 14 hikes and hopes that the number of participants will continue to grow over the years.
Rural Grants to Support Business Enterprise
Associated Press - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

A half dozen organizations in the state will receive nearly $200,000 in federal money to grow small enterprises in rural parts of the state. The money is coming in the form of U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program grants. The largest grant is an award of nearly $50,000 that is going to the Northern Maine Development Commission in Caribou. Grants are also going to organizations in Auburn, Brunswick, South Paris and Bangor to assist Maine business people with "resources and training for new, innovative industries, particularly those located in rural areas.''
Acadia wormers, clammers, towns await congressional action to fix park boundary, marine harvesting issues
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

In 2016, for the first time since the park opened in 1916, Acadia National Park rangers had begun stopping diggers from working the mud abutting park property. A ranger forced a wormer to dump his catch – a day’s work – in the mud, while clammers had been issued summonses for violating park rules. Meanwhile, town officials in the area were already alarmed after learning a universally popular expansion of the park on the Schoodic Peninsula was being accomplished without the approval of Congress. Identical bills submitted in the Senate and House in February by Sen. Angus King and Rep. Bruce Poliquin that seek to resolve these issues have been stalled for months on Capitol Hill.
How Wolfe’s Neck Farm is combating climate change
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

This month, Wolfe’s Neck Farm got a new name, the Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment, and officially became part of an internationally trending agricultural movement that aims to fight climate change from the ground up. A big part of the rebranding has to do with a mission happening underfoot. Literally. This transformation is about using the soil on this centuries-old 626-acre farm on the shores of Casco Bay to combat climate change. It's all in the dirt.
Column: Anne Hayden has farmed for oysters and protected fisheries
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

Anne Hayden is the program manager for Manomet’s Sustainable Economies Program. She joined the science-based sustainability group in 2012 after nearly two decades as an independent environmental consultant working mostly on marine issues. Based out of Manomet’s Maine office in Brunswick, Hayden coordinates a partnership between nine different groups that form the Downeast Fisheries Partnership, including Manomet, Maine Farmland Trust and the Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries. The group’s goal is to work collaboratively to restore regional fisheries. ~ Mary Pols
Column: Don’t let vampire energy users suck your house dry
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

Ironically, now some home electronics use more power when they are off than when they are on. Vampire power loads are the electrical equivalent of vehicular idling; they waste energy and aggravate climate change for no practical purpose. Electricity generation accounts for more than a third of the nation’s carbon dioxide emissions. The wasted electricity from phantom appliances nationwide represents the output of roughly 50 large power plants. The double shutdown that power strips require is neither efficient nor convenient. It’s a temporary fix to a problem that appliance manufacturers have created and need to solve. ~ Marina Schauffler
Column: Is your feeder getting little use? There’s a simple reason why
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

Fall migration is drawing to an end, so many of our summer birds have moved on to warmer quarters for the winter. However, most birds that frequent our feeders are residents. Many observers have noted the dearth of black-capped chickadees, tufted titmice, white-breasted nuthatches, American goldfinches, downy woodpeckers and hairy woodpeckers. Where did they go? The abandonment of bird feeders does not indicate a precipitous decline in bird populations. The phenomenon of resident birds forsaking handouts actually occurs every fall. ~ Herb Wilson
Column: Four paddlers create special bond while kayaking around New England
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

Tom Armstrong, Ben Pearson, Charlie Woodworth and I have been piecing together the dream of a 32-year, 3,200-mile kayak circumnavigation of New England a little at a time, 80 miles here, 150 miles there. Over the decades, family crises intervened and jobs changed, but we kept the dream alive, even during the few years we were not able create more lines on the map. The journey started in 1985 and ended in mid-October after a 3,200-mile trek. ~ Michael Perry
Column: Rattling a prize buck isn’t as easy as it sounds
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

Is it too early to rattle? When can I start using estrus scents? Has the rut kicked in yet? Deer hunters are constantly looking for answers that might give them a slight edge over the wiley whitetail, or at least boost their confidence. Unfortunately, it’s just not as simple as we would like. ~ Bob Humphrey
Opinion: Fall remains the time for cursing oak trees
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

Fall is the best time of year in Maine, but it’s also when my huge, 100-year-old oak trees decide to make my life miserable by first dropping billions of acorns on my lawn, and then, when I’ve barely recovered from that assault, shedding another few billion leaves. A leaf blower would be helpful, but I need a more creative solution. Yes, I have it – a flamethrower. ~ Steven Price, Kennebunkport
Letter: Bad decision on environment
Sun Journal - Sunday, October 29, 2017 

On Oct. 10, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt made a disastrous decision to move forward with plans to repeal the Clean Power Plan, America’s first and only federal limits on carbon pollution from existing power plants. Not only that, he is also stacking the deck to justify dismantling these lifesaving health and carbon pollution protections. The Trump administration is making it clear that it is rigging the system to benefit big polluters at the expense of Maine citizen’s health and safety. That decision is against the environmental values of the great state of Maine. ~ Cassidy Cloutier, Auburn
Offshore Wind Farms See Promise in Platforms That Float
New York Times - Thursday, September 29, 2016 

The University of Maine is undertaking an elaborate physics experiment meant to simulate conditions that full-scale floating wind turbines could face at an installation being planned about 10 miles off the Maine coast in up to 360 feet of water near tiny Monhegan Island. For nearly 18 months in 2013 and 2014, an operating version of the apparatus — one-eighth of scale — sat in the waters off Castine sending electricity to the grid. That proved the technology fundamentally worked and guided refinements to the design. Now, the UMaine team is using the data collected at the lab to confirm the final form, a crucial next step in bringing the technology to market.
Blog: Singing is an act of territorialism for birds
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, April 7, 2016 

Birds don’t think about much, mostly just food and sex. Despite the simplicity of such a life, bird communication can be quite complex. Birds are renowned for their vocal abilities, but they use lots of visual cues, too. Perhaps nothing is more obvious than the crests sported by many species. ~ Bob Duchesne
Marco Rubio Finds Common Ground With Armed Militia In Oregon
Climate Progress - Thursday, January 7, 2016 

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio (R) doesn’t like that militants are currently occupying a federal wildlife facility in Oregon. But he does like the militia’s main idea: Seizing and selling off America’s public lands. Rubio explained his position on the controversial occupation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, now entering its fifth day. Rubio said that while he doesn’t support “lawless” activity, he does agree with the militia on its main point that federal public lands should be transferred to private ownership for activities like logging, coal mining, oil drilling, and farming. Rubio’s plan would essentially cause a free-for-all, where states can devastate national forests, parks, and other important wildlife and plantlife zones for temporary economic gain.
Editorial: Conflict over land preservation confirms where the public stands
Portland Press Herald - Wednesday, December 16, 2015 

If Gov. Paul LePage’s yearslong barricade of Land for Maine’s Future has proven anything, it’s how popular the conservation program is among a broad cross-section of the state. When the governor held hostage the voter-approved bonds that fund the program, residents from across the political divide responded with one voice, united in their support for an initiative that has protected more than 550,000 acres for a variety of economic and recreational uses. That response should make it clear that the focus should be on strengthening and tightening the program, not obstructing or trying to dismantle it, as LePage has done for most of his time in office. The governor, not corruption or mismanagement, is the program’s true problem.
Opinion: This is Bar Harbor’s chance to become a solar success and example
Bangor Daily News - Tuesday, May 19, 2015 

On June 2, Bar Harbor voters have an exciting opportunity to take a step toward putting the brakes on climate change. Article T on the town meeting agenda authorizes leasing town land and roofs as part of Community Solar Farms and Power Purchase Agreements for the purpose of providing power to the municipality. The change starts here and now. With our prominence as a popular tourist destination, Bar Harbor has an outsize influence on the rest of the state and the nation. By voting for this article we are saying that we care, that we can make a collective difference. ~ Gary Friedmann, Bar Harbor Town Council
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