November 18, 2018  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Maine Youth Wilderness Leadership Program
Announcement - Friday, November 30, 2012 

Friends of Baxter State Park invites Maine high school sophomores and juniors to participate in its innovative Maine Youth Wilderness Leadership Program. Ten participants will be selected for an extraordinary opportunity to spend nine days immersed in the finest example of wild country in Maine. Application deadline is Feb 8, 2013.
Eyes On Owls, Dec 8
Event - Posted - Friday, November 30, 2012 

Join Naturalist Marcia Wilson and photographer Mark Wilson for Maine Audubon’s annual visit with several live owls. Includes a hooting lesson, and entertaining slideshow, and a close-up look at several different species. The morning is suitable for children. At Gilsland Farm, Falmouth, Dec 8, 10:30 am – 4:15 pm. Registration fee.
Maine Fly Fishing Show, Dec 8
Event - Posted - Friday, November 30, 2012 

The 2012 Maine Fly Fishing Show helps to support the 2013 Maine TU Trout Camp. At the Elks Lodge, 1945 Congress Street in Portland, Dec 8, 9 am - 7 pm. $5 for adults, $3 for kids. Sponsored by he Maine Council of Trout Unlimited.
Forum on the Covenant between Land and Sea, Dec 7-8
Event - Posted - Friday, November 30, 2012 

Films and speakers present a close-up look at how our Oceans and Local Fishing Communities are being affected by Environmental Changes. At University of Maine at Machias, Dec 7-8.
RESTORE: The North Woods 20th Anniversary Gathering, Dec 6
Event - Posted - Friday, November 30, 2012 

Join members and friends at RESTORE's 20th Anniversary Gathering. At Curtis Library, Brunswick, Dec 6, 6- 8:30 pm.
Moonbird: A Year on the Wind, Dec 6
Event - Posted - Friday, November 30, 2012 

Newbery Honor and National Book Award–winning Maine author Phillip Hoose tells the extraordinary story of a single bird’s strength, adaptability, and determination in the face of challenges that push his species toward extinction. At Gilsland Farm, Falmouth, Dec 6, 7-8:30 pm. Sponsored by Maine Audubon.
EHSC 10th Anniversary Celebration, Dec 6
Event - Posted - Friday, November 30, 2012 

Join the Environmental Health Strategy Center at One Longfellow Square in Portland for a toast to ten years of preventing harm and honoring environmental health leaders while enjoying hors d'oeuvres, Rachel Carson's Silent Spring inspired art by Kate Chappell, and live music. Dec 6, 5:30-7:30 pm.
Changing Seas, Human Challenges, Dec 5
Announcement - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Graham Shimmield, executive director of Bigelow Laboratory, and Colin Woodward, a journalist and author based in Maine, discuss the health of our oceans and their effect on our lives. Maine Public Radio, Dec 5, 1 pm.
Green Eggs and Energy, Dec 5
Event - Posted - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Dylan Voorhees, Clean Energy Project Director at the Natural Resources Council of Maine, will address what might be on the horizon for Maine’s legislation. At Maine Audubon's Gilsland Farm Education Center, Falmouth, Dec 5, 7:30 pm. NRCM members $15; non-members $20.
Give Sen. Collins an earful, Dec 4
Action Alert - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

U.S. Senator Susan Collins' staff plans to hold constituent meetings across Maine on Dec 4. This is an excellent opportunity to urge Senator Collins and her staff to support legislation that will fully fund our national parks, safeguard the public from dangerous chemicals, protect endangered species, curb climate disruption, support river restoration, preserve marine habitats in the Gulf of Maine, and whatever other issues are on your mind.
Tar Sands Movie, Dec 4
Event - Posted - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

The award-winning movie “Pipe Dreams” by Leslie Iwerks shows the risks tar sands oil poses to Maine’s environment. At the Otisfield Town Office, Dec 4, 7 pm. Sponsored by the Natural Resources Council of Maine.
State of Maine's Environment 2012, Dec 4
Event - Posted - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Colby College seniors majoring in environmental studies will present their research on four areas of environmental policy in Maine: large landscape conservation, energy infrastructure (specifically the natural gas pipeline network and the electricity transmission grid), management of hazardous waste as it compares to other states, and voluntary certification programs. At Colby College, Waterville, Diamond Building, Ostrove Auditorium, Dec 4, 7 pm.
Friends Of The Piscataquis Valley Open House, Dec 2
Event - Posted - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Friends Of The Piscataquis Valley will hold an open house at the new Information Center in Dover-Foxcroft on Main Street, next to the Center Theatre. Dec 2, 11 am - 4 pm.
Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park Offers Winter Programs
Event - Posted - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, one of Maine’s popular coastal state parks, is offering nature programs at 2 pm each Sunday through the winter, starting on Dec 2.
East-West Corridor Info Session, Nov 30
Event - Posted - Wednesday, November 28, 2012 

Chris Buchanan, a coordinator for a coalition of Maine citizens that is working to uncover facts, promote transparency, and raise public awareness about the East-West Corridor, will speak at Quimby Middle School, Bingham, Nov 30, 6:30 pm.
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News Items
Opinion: Indigenous Issues and the Newly-Elected Governor, Janet Mills
Other - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Newly-elected Governor Janet Mills is known for her work in opposition to Indigenous issues during her time as Attorney General. Three of the most pressing issues are presented in the following essay, along with steps in moving forward. ~ Dawn Neptune Adams
Record growth for bald eagles in northern New England
Associated Press - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Bald eagles are in the midst of record population growth in northern New England, where America’s national bird could soon find itself removed from all state endangered lists. The eagle was once completely gone from Vermont and New Hampshire and down to just 21 pairs in Maine. But wildlife officials and conservationists in the three states said the bird is repopulating fast, to the point where it has become a threat to rarer species in some areas. Wildlife officials attributed the bird’s comeback to habitat and environmental protection measures, such as the ban on the pesticide DDT, a change that made it easier for birds of prey like eagles to reproduce successfully.
How to start your own mealworm farm
Bangor Daily News - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Sometimes the best way to save a buck on feed is to make it yourself. A do-it-yourself mealworm farm is a cheap and easy way to make treats for your farm fowl from the comfort of your own home. Mealworm cuisine is an adventurous experiment, though some still squirm at the thought of eating worms. Even if you don’t plan to add mealworms to your diet, your chickens will thank you for the locally sourced treats.
Great stories of logging in the Maine Woods
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

It took a lot of wood to make Great Northern in Millinocket the largest paper mill in the world. And in his new book, "Logging Towboats and Boom Jumpers," published by North Country Press, Roger Moody gives us an interesting account of how O.A. Harkness built a specialized inland navy to get all that wood to the mill.
To keep old growth out of new shirts, fashion turns to technology
Bloomberg News - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

More than 150 million trees are cleared every year, shipped around the world, then pulped and processed into viscose – aka rayon, the cheap, silk-ish fabric most mass-market brands can’t survive without. It’s nearly impossible to know whether it originated in American tree farms or Indonesian old growth forests. Unless someone’s paying attention. So several brands spent the last year helping the Canadian nonprofit Canopy build a website called Forest Mapper that uses satellite imagery and conservation research to identify the forests that scientists say need to be left alone.
With boots firmly planted in Japan, L.L. Bean kicks up growth
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

L.L. Bean opened its 28th Japanese store in eastern Tokyo last month, even as it beefed up new deals to sell its products at more Japanese retail stores. Sales continue to increase each year. Here's the inside story of the Freeport company's improbable and sustained success in one of the world's toughest retail markets for outsiders.
CMP warned of ‘working off the same playbook’ that stymied New Hampshire energy project
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Experts outside of Maine who are watching Avangrid/CMP struggle see parallels between what happened in New Hampshire and what’s unfolding in Maine. They wonder what lessons Avangrid/CMP learned from the experience of Northern Pass. And looking at a bigger picture, they wonder whether any major overhead transmission project can gain enough support these days to be built in New England.
Get busy with botany at Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

It’s Sunday, don’t you feel like seeing some art, especially an exhibit with a sustainable twist? Pop over to the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, which is showing select works by two artist-botanists who captured plant life in all its stunning glory, Kate Furbish and Edwin Hale Lincoln. The exhibit is meant to highlight the growing interest in botany as the American industrial age was taking off.
The incredible edible world of David Spahr
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

David Spahr, author of “Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms of New England and Eastern Canada: A Photographic Guidebook to Finding and Using Key Species,” is the state’s authority on local edible mushrooms. For the self-taught Spahr, the Maine landscape is a giant potential pantry.
Anna McGinn is headed to her fifth international climate change meeting
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

UMaine graduate student Anna McGinn is gearing up for her fifth trip to the United Nations’ climate change negotiations, the annual gathering of world leaders that in 2015 led to the Paris Accord, a global agreement on taking measures to combat climate change. This time, the meetings are in Poland. But before McGinn heads overseas, she’s bringing simulations of the meeting to students throughout Maine and hoping to bring some of them along virtually. We talked to McGinn about how she is helping Maine students channel the needs of both far-flung countries and their own.
Strange and quirky hunting stories from Registered Maine Guides
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Hunting season is not just about spending time in the woods, tracking deer and trying to bring home wild game meat. It’s about stories. And probably nobody has as many quirky or ridiculous stories of the woods as Registered Maine Guides. “Stories are part of what clients are paying for,” said Registered Maine Guide Mike Andreotti of Thornehead Guide Service. We contacted a dozen guides for stories and found this to be true. Here are a few of them.
Column: It’s not what you say, it’s what you mean
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Deer hunters have terms unique to their avocation. But terms and phrases instantly recognizable to fellow enthusiasts can be confusing to non-hunters, and occasionally even hunters. Let’s take still-hunting, for example. The word “still” seems to imply being motionless and quiet. But still-hunting actually refers to a hunter moving slowly, stopping frequently to look and listen. Hunters should be mindful of who might be within earshot lest you should rub them the wrong way, which could get you into a real scrape. ~ Bob Humphrey
Column: Scarborough provides perfect spot for November outing
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

There are always a few days in November that provide some of the best paddling outings of the year. Bold blue sky, crystal clear water, enough fall colors left to keep your camera busy, that special feeling of a face alive and pulsating from the caress of a light breeze, and a body kept warm and toasty by the low-angled sun, and your trusty fleece and windbreaker. We recently headed to Scarborough’s winding Nonesuch River for three hours of exploring just inland from the open ocean at Pine Point. ~ Michael Perry
Column: Look into the abyss at gorgeous Gulf Hagas
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

The Rim Trail follows Gulf Hagas for about three miles, with the gorge becoming deeper and deeper, and the falls becoming more and more spectacular. The trail rises and falls with the rim, sometimes offering expansive views from high above the water, and sometimes getting close enough for you to step onto rocks in the river. Here is where the scale of Gulf Hagas becomes apparent; at its deepest point the walls of the gorge are more than 100 feet high. Make sure you’re wearing sturdy footwear and exercise extreme caution, especially in slippery conditions. ~ Jake Christie
Letter: Mills should continue LePage’s fiscal restraint
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Though a difficult person for many, not an environmentalist and not diplomatic in anyone’s book, Gov. LePage has been trustworthy with the finances of the state. Governor-elect Janet Mills is experienced and good. Let us hope she will not discard the previous administration’s attention to keeping financial matters balanced and will be grateful for Maine’s improved fiscal position. ~ Joseph R.D. deKay, Hiram
Letter: Who brings an infant along on a hunting trip?
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

Has the world gone completely mad? Hunter Christine Barnes, shown carrying her infant son on opening day, brings the question to the fore. How can anyone justify exposing a 7-month-old baby to the inherent dangers of errant bullets being discharged in the forest during prime hunting season? Every year there are reports of accidental injuries to and even deaths of hunters and others. This baby is even shown wearing a furry, animal-pelt-like jacket. Is there no law establishing age limits for kids on hunting trips? How about “reckless endangerment of a minor”? This infant had no choice in the decision to go hunting. ~ Gail W. Veliger, Cape Elizabeth
Letter: With election over, Maine needs development agenda that deals with climate change
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

With the midterms behind us, we are presented with an opportunity to set out a new agenda for social and economic development in Maine, in a time and place specifically affected by climate change. We already feel its impacts on weather, fisheries, tourism and more. Governor-elect Mills should convene the best of Maine’s talent to look forward to a new development vision, one that accepts the challenge of climate change and defines new solutions, one that lays out a plan based on our unique natural wealth. ~ Peter Neill, World Ocean Observatory
Letter: CMP’s powerline would help climate
Kennebec Journal - Sunday, November 18, 2018 

With devastating wildfires in California, an ever-evolving climate, and unstable oil costs, Central Maine Power’s New England Clean Energy Connect is something we should all be embracing. According to the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, we have only a dozen years to address this problem before things get even more out of hand. If Massachusetts and the rest of New England are using less oil and more hydropower, that will translate into healthier air for all of us to breathe and add greater relief to our wallets at the same time. ~ Michael Hall, Augusta [According to a 2017 Avangrid report, a Michael Hall is director of a nonprofit in Augusta that got a grant from Avangrid. ]
Column: University of Maine will start testing ticks for disease
Sun Journal - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

Most of us who spend time outdoors have had encounters with deer ticks, the bad ones, or know someone with Lyme disease. When it comes to ticks, the best defense is a good offense. After a day in the woods or the garden, always check yourself for ticks. What’s a good anti-tick spray? UMaine professor Jim Dill, a tick expert, and many others in the know, highly recommend a spray for your clothes only that contains the ingredient Permethrin. ~ V. Paul Reynolds
The kick off to the holiday season marks a busy time at West Gardiner’s Foggy Moon Farm
Kennebec Journal - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

The weeks leading up to the winter holiday season are the busiest for Judy and Tom Abbott. While all the holiday turkeys and pork were all spoken for by the end of September, the care and feeding continues. For 15 years, they have been raising and selling turkeys from their West Gardiner Foggy Moon Farm. About five years ago, they added pigs and two years later, they added cattle. “The hardest time of the year is when everyone starts eating more,” Abbott said.
New Partnership Could Boost Ridership For Greater Portland Metro
Maine Public - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

The Greater Portland Metro Bus system is being asked to be a partner in a mixed-use development planned for the site of the former Pike Industries quarry in Westbrook. The developers say they can access millions of dollars in tax free bond money if Metro leases the project's roadway infrastructure. Developer Waterstone would actually give Metro the money to make the lease payments. General Manager Greg Jordan says Metro is interested in the development because of its potential to generate transit ridership.
Sabattus hunter shot in Topsham after girlfriend slips on ice, fires shotgun
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

A Sabattus man was shot during a Saturday morning hunting trip in Topsham when his girlfriend, 21-year-old Sasha Leslie, also of Sabattus, slipped on ice and her shotgun went off. Joshua Stark, 25, was shot in the hip off of Cathance Road in Topsham around 7:30 a.m. and taken to Maine Medical Center in Portland, about 30 miles south, according to Cpl. John MacDonald of the Maine Warden Service. He is expected to survive the injury.
They can bag more deer elsewhere, but hunters set their sights on Maine
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

When Ronald McAlpine of Jacksonville, Florida, hunts for white-tailed deer in his home state, he can shoot as many as he wants. Florida has no bag limit. So why does he come each fall to Maine, which has had a bag limit of one deer for almost a century? "The bigger deer in Maine,” McAlpine said. “Most people would like the opportunity to hunt in Maine.” Out-of-state hunters say the allure of bigger bucks and the challenge of hunting in uncrowded woods brings them to Maine. And more of them are coming. This year, Maine issued 84,745 any-deer permits – the most since the state went to a permit system in 1986. Nearly 5 percent – 3,906 – were given to out-of-state hunters. It’s the largest number of non-resident permits since 2007.
Flying squirrel colonies not the best roommates
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

The last thing a homeowner needs is a colony of flying squirrels living in their walls or attics, but should that happen, there are ways to get flying squirrels out of your house. “The best thing is to seal up the entire house and block any holes or cracks where they may be getting in,” said Randy Canarr of Maine Wildlife Management. “Animals like squirrels, rats, mice or other rodents inside a home are signs of a faulty and porous house that is open enough to let them in.”
Letter: The long view: CMP power line proposal hurts Maine
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, November 17, 2018 

I’ve been a Maine Guide since 1987. I’ve led countless wilderness adventures. I have a thorough understanding and appreciation for our wilderness, and I have serious concerns over the risks of this power line proposal. The proposed 145-mile Central Maine Power line going over the western mountains region and the Kennebec River. will negatively affect the environment and Maine’s economy, and I’m gravely concerned about the devastating impact the power line would have on the therapeutic value of Maine’s wilderness. As an adventure-based counselor, I intentionally take clients into the wild to expose them to the therapeutic nature of wilderness settings because contact with nature offers a wide range of health benefits. ~ Rod Nadeau, North Yarmouth
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