October 21, 2018  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Rise for Climate, Sep 8
Event - Posted - Friday, August 31, 2018 

80+ actions will take place across the globe to demand elected officials make immediate and tangible commitments to tackle the climate crisis. September 8.
A River Runs Through It, Sep 7
Event - Posted - Friday, August 31, 2018 

Downeast Lakes Land Trust presents Robert Redford’s 1992 film “A River Runs Through It.” At Grand Lake Stream ball field, September 7, 7 pm.
Swan Island Outing, Sep 7
Event - Posted - Friday, August 31, 2018 

Local historian Jay Robbins leads a tour of the Swan Island by truck, mixed with programming at the Island’s interpretative center and ample time to walk about. September 7, from 9 am - 1 pm, preregister. Sponsored by Friends of Merrymeeting Bay.
Foraging: Edible and Medicinal Plants, Sep 6
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 30, 2018 

Ryan Busby, instructor with the Maine Primitive Skills School, will help participants learn to identify, plants, sustainably harvest, and use wild-foraged foods. At Lithgow Library, Augusta, September 6, 6:30 pm.
Become a Casco Bay Water Reporter
Announcement - Wednesday, August 29, 2018 

Want to get outside, take photos that may help protect the health of Casco Bay, and connect with other community members? Join theFriends of Casco Bay volunteer Observing Network, Water Reporter.
Managing Maine's Invasive Plants and Insects, Sep 4
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 28, 2018 

Join Nancy Olmstead from the Maine Natural Areas Program (MNAP) to learn about community and statewide efforts to control invasive plants and insects. At Patten Library, Bath, September 4, 6:30 pm, pre-register.
Defend the ESA
Action Alert - Tuesday, August 28, 2018 

Despite the Endangered Species Act’s successful track record preventing extinction, it is under threat. ~ Maine Audubon
Kavanaugh no friend to the environment
Action Alert - Tuesday, August 28, 2018 

Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, is no friend to the environment. As a D.C. Circuit court judge, Kavanaugh repeatedly ruled against EPA’s efforts to protect clean air and regulate industries contributing to climate change. Now is the time to take action: tell Senator Collins and Senator King to say NO to Judge Kavanaugh. ~ Conservation Law Foundation
Who is Brett Kavanaugh? Sep 4
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 28, 2018 

Join Maine Conservation Voters et al on the first day of Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings for a Town Hall panel discussion to learn about where he stands on the key issues. At University of Southern Maine, Portland, September 4, 6:30 pm.
11th Annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival, Nov 3
Event - Posted - Monday, August 27, 2018 

At University of Southern Maine, Abromson Center, Portland, November 3, 3 pm, $30 in advance, $35 at door. Benefits Friends of Casco Bay.
Rangeley Trail Town Festival, Sep 1
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 25, 2018 

Rangeley is one of only 35 towns along the 2,180-mile AT to be named an official “Appalachian Trail Community.” Join the Rangeley Trail Town Festival, September 1, 10 am - 4 pm.
Beyond Borders Farmers Market, Aug 31
Event - Posted - Friday, August 24, 2018 

Fresh, organic and locally grown produce plus exotic jarred delights. At Viles Arboretum, Augusta, August 31, 12-3 pm.
Exploring the Downeast Lakes through maps, Aug 30
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 23, 2018 

Cartographer Jane Crosen presents an interesting look at the Downeast Lakes region. At Grand Lake Stream School Building, August 40, 6 pm. Sponsored by Downeast Lakes Land Trust.
Endangered Atlantic salmon, Aug 29
Event - Posted - Wednesday, August 22, 2018 

John Burrows, Atlantic Salmon Federation, and Paul Christman, Maine Department of Marine Resources, talk about endangered Atlantic salmon and local projects that support them in the Kennebec, Sheepscot, and Androscoggin Rivers. At Bath Freight Shed, August 29, 6:30 p.m. Sponsored by Kennebec Estuary Land Trust and Midcoast Conservancy.
Environmental Trivia, Aug 28
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 21, 2018 

Join ReVision Energy and Maine Conservation Voters for an environmental-themed trivia night. Categories will include environmental pop culture, Maine wildlife, climate change and more. At Rising Tide, Portland, August 28, 5:30 pm.
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News Items
A technological match made in Newport
Morning Sentinel - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

Tucked in a residential neighborhood in Newport rests what some might consider the world’s greatest matchmaker. It’s not people who are coupled, but drumsticks. The site, now under the ownership of the Avedis Zildjian Company (famous for its cymbals), churns out approximately 5 million pairs of sticks each year. Its hickory and maple products are matched by color, weight and even the frequency of sound they make when struck — a complex variable no competitor has figured out precisely how to account for.
Sea monsters
UMaine Today - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

In the past century, sea level along the Maine coast has risen about 7.5 inches. However, over the last 20 years, global sea level rise rates have almost doubled. In 2014, with funding from Maine Sea Grant, John Cannon, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Gray, began collaborating with university researchers who have access to powerful computer models and the latest ocean data. “We can actually predict how areas will flood, and how to apply the information to other areas, such as rebuilding seawalls or making dunes taller for coastal adaptation and flood mitigation,” says Dongmei Xie, who conducted Ph.D. research at UMaine. Xie also has generated maps predicting flooding with different sea level rise scenarios.


Opinion: The Trump administration’s deregulation efforts are saving billions of dollars
Washington Post - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

Since President Donald Trump took office, farmers can more productively use their land. Small businesses can hire more workers and provide more affordable health care. Innovators are freer to pursue advances in autonomous vehicles, drones and commercial space exploration. Veterans enjoy expanded access to doctors through a telehealth program. And infrastructure can be improved more quickly with streamlined permitting requirements. Over the past two years, federal agencies have reduced regulatory costs by $23 billion and eliminated hundreds of burdensome regulations. We’re projecting even more reform in 2019. ~ Naomi Rao, Office of Management and Budget
Orrington fifth-grader bags 5-pointer on Youth Deer Day
Bangor Daily News - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

Thomas Pelkey, a 10-year-old fifth-grader, showed up at the local tagging station on Saturday morning as an “old” veteran of the Youth Deer Day scene. As they say, he’s even got the hat (and rifle) to prove it. For the past 13 years, Bob Bastey, the owner of Bob’s Kozy Korner store, has offered young hunters who tag a deer at his establishment a guaranteed prize, and a chance at a bigger reward. Every youth hunter gets a hunter orange “Bob’s Kozy Korner” hat upon registering a deer. And at the end of the season, one lucky youth walks away with a .243 Savage hunting rifle. On Saturday, Pelkey showed up wearing one of those hats. And he shot his 5-pointer with the .243 Savage he won in the 2016 drawing.
Issues in the governor’s race: Energy policy
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

Viewed through a lens of energy policy, this election of Maine’s next governor will be a referendum on the direction set over eight years by outgoing Gov. Paul LePage. It could read: Will Maine build a robust framework for renewable energy, or prop up existing fossil fuel systems? The candidates take different stands on:
• New England Clean Energy Connect
• PUC chairman
• Home heating
• Natural Gas
• Net metering
• Maine Aqua Ventus/UMaine offshore wind
• Land-based wind
• Biomass
Green movement grows brighter on campuses in Maine
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

Maine academic institutions have led and continue to lead the charge nationally. Last week, Bowdoin College opened the Roux Center for the Environment, built to meet LEED platinum standards. Unity College was the first college in the nation to open a passive house residence hall. Colby College ranks second for “air and climate” on the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education’s 2017 rankings for green schools across the nation. Bates College is ranked fourth on the same association’s list for energy use last year.
Camden mountain obstacle race a worthy test
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

It’s fitting that my first running race in 20 years had hurdles. And that the volunteers on the Ragged Mountain Scuttle course told me to clear these barriers with one leg out, in true track form. It’s fitting because 30 years ago I was an All-American high school hurdler, the New York state champion in the 400 hurdles and the state record-holder. And because I came to Camden to overcome a few personal hurdles. ~ Deirdre Fleming
Artist ‘redesigns’ recycled fabrics into new clothes
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

Sandra Deprey of Frenchville is a longtime dog groomer and artist who is now developing her skills as a “fashion redesigner,” using recycled fabrics as her medium. Her work, sold under the name Carry the Memory, transforms old sweaters into tunics and T-shirts into boho skirts.
Get busy on new Brunswick bike trails
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

Here’s a great opportunity to celebrate a collaborative effort between the Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust and the Six Rivers Chapter of the New England Mountain Bike Association. Put down this paper and get outside! The organizations are throwing a party to debut four new miles of mountain bike trails at Brunswick Landing. The trails are all introductory, so the event is good for all ages. Don’t have a mountain bike? Two Brunswick bike shops are chipping in to help. Center Street Cycle will be on hand with 12 Specialized Stumpjumper bikes for attendees to try out. Gorham Bike & Ski will offer bike repair and mechanics workshops. Trail rides from 10 a.m. to noon on October 21.
UNH professor Tom Haines explores sources of fuel and how they can change
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

Tom Haines’ new book, “Walking to the Sun: A Journey through America’s Energy Landscapes,” is about his trips to places in America where forms of energy are either being extracted (oil, gas, coal) or harvested or utilized (water, wind, sun). He was exploring in a literal sense (on foot) and also a figurative one – how can humans move from fossil fuels to renewables? “The book is really looking at industrial-scale stuff,” he said. “And how can the system be changed?”
Column: An unsentimental education in troublesome horsetail
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

With gardeners growing more native plants all of the time, there is still one native many hate to see. It is among the most ancient natives, dating back to the Devonian period, 350 to 400 million years ago. I’m talking about equisetum, which goes by the common name horsetail. ~ Tom Attwell
Column: Take advantage of the National Trails System Act, and go take a hike
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

In the company of two friends, I crested the craggy ledges atop Third Mountain along the Appalachian Trail several weeks ago at the height of the fall foliage. We uttered a collective “wow” as we stood in awe of the extraordinary panorama before us, a kaleidoscope of brilliant colors as far as the eye could see, muted not at all by the steely gray skies above. Given the bounty of natural beauty before us, and with our feet firmly planted on America’s most beloved long footpath, the Appalachian Trail, it was an appropriate time and place to mark the 50th anniversary of the monumental legislation that forever altered the landscape of trails and hiking and backpacking in this country. ~ Carey Kish
Column: Managing deer herd is a daunting task
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

Maine has a new plan for long-term management plan for our big-game species. A previous one called for a statewide deer population objective of 384,000. In 2001, the state's deer biologist said, “If we can succeed in restoring winter habitat to the north and east, and solve the access problem, we can safely winter 480,000 deer and hold the harvest at 50,000 deer.” The population goal in the most recently adopted big–game management plan is 210,000 deer by 2033. That’s roughly half of the previous objective and well below the optimum sustained yield level. It means even fewer any-deer permits in the future. The most obvious solution to growing the herd is improving winter habitat, which can be a daunting task in a state where 90-some percent of the forested land is private. ~ Bob Humphrey
Column: Wayne’s wonderful on a fall day
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 21, 2018 

October is one of the most beautiful months to go paddling in Maine. Vibrant fall colors and migrating birds make for memorable outings. Pocasset Lake and Pickerel Pond in Wayne provide two distinct experiences. Pocasset offers open water paddling and expansive views. Although the lake has many cottages along the shoreline, this time of year things are pretty quiet. Pickerel is connected to Pocasset and offers remote paddling along grass-ringed marshes, providing a cozy and serene setting. ~ Michael Perry
DIFW expanding protection of native brook trout and charr
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Saturday, October 20, 2018 

The Department of Inland Fisheries and wildlife has stepped up big time to expand protection of our native brook trout and Arctic charr. Recently, they went public with their proposal.
Column: 'Too much country, too short a life' for hunters
Sun Journal - Saturday, October 20, 2018 

Sooner or later in our lives, most of us contemplate our own mortality. Those of us who really love the deer woods tend to use the number of deer seasons left as yardstick of our days. It is said, though, that most deer hunters go through stages, and tend to lose their ardor for the hunt in the twilight of their lives. Elk hunter, writer Fred Benton probably spoke for all of us diehard hunters when he wrote: “Every hunter, at some point, realizes that elk country gets bigger, steeper and tougher, more exhausting and less accessible as the seasons pass. What it comes down to is too much country, too short a life.” ~ Paul V. Reynolds
Sue Hubbell, Milbridge beekeeping writer, dies at 83
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, October 20, 2018 

In the end, Sue Hubbell died as she had lived — her way. The author, essayist, farmer and beekeeper passed away Oct. 13, at the Bar Harbor home of her son Brian Hubbell, where she had been living since August. She was 83-years-old and had been dealing with dementia, according to family members. A month prior to her death, she announced she was taking matters into her own hands.
State refuses town request for more time on shellfish farm expansion
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, October 20, 2018 

Portsmouth Herald - The Maine Department of Marine Resources denied the town’s request to hold a second public hearing and delay a decision on the Spinney Creek Shellfish aquaculture expansion application. At the request of concerned residents who felt their interests were not fairly represented at the Sept. 27 adjudicatory hearing, Town Manager Kendra Amaral wrote a letter to DMR Commissioner Patrick Keliher on Oct. 12 requesting a scoping session be held and for the department to delay its decision. Spinney Creek Shellfish in Eliot seeks to expand oyster farming operations. The Friends of Spinney Creek collected 400 signatures on a petition opposing the application.
Aliens and body snatchers
UMaine Today - Saturday, October 20, 2018 

Research by Eleanor Groden, a professor of entomology at the University of Maine, research focuses on understanding the brown-tail moth’s natural enemies — the various parasitoids, fungi and viruses that target the caterpillars — that may be used to help curb the rapidly expanding moth populations affecting Maine’s communities.
Be the Hummingbird; Be the Bear
Earth Island Journal - Saturday, October 20, 2018 

Which one of us did not hold our newborn babies in our trembling arms and whisper, I will always love you. I will keep you safe. I will give you the world. We didn’t mean, I will give you whatever is left scattered and torn on the table after the great cosmic going-out-of-business sale. But in the face of climate change, what does this promise mean? What will be that force that stands in the way of the reckless destruction of lives, if it is not the power of those who give and support life? — the mothers and grandmothers, the aunties and godmothers, the women who love the children. ~ Kathleen Dean Moore
Mainers are voting on five ballot questions this fall
Maine Environmental News - Saturday, October 20, 2018 

Mainers are voting on five ballot questions this fall:
• Q1 is a 3.8% tax hike on high income earners to pay for a Home Care Program for seniors and people with disabilities.
• Q2 directs $30 million over the next decade to Maine municipalities where subpar septic systems are leaking untreated stormwater and sewage into the ocean, lakes and rivers.
• Q3 invests $106 million into maintenance of the state’s roads and bridges.
• Q4 provides $49 million, matched by another $49 million in public and private money, to Maine’s university system to modernize and improve facilities across the seven campuses.
• Q5 provides $15 million to improve educational programs by upgrading facilities at all 7 of Maine's community colleges.
DIFW expanding protection of native brook trout and charr
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Saturday, October 20, 2018 

The Department of Inland Fisheries and wildlife has stepped up big time to expand protection of our native brook trout and Arctic charr. Recently, they went public with their proposal.
State refuses town request for more time on shellfish farm expansion
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, October 20, 2018 

Portsmouth Herald - The Maine Department of Marine Resources denied the town’s request to hold a second public hearing and delay a decision on the Spinney Creek Shellfish aquaculture expansion application. At the request of concerned residents who felt their interests were not fairly represented at the Sept. 27 adjudicatory hearing, Town Manager Kendra Amaral wrote a letter to DMR Commissioner Patrick Keliher on Oct. 12 requesting a scoping session be held and for the department to delay its decision. Spinney Creek Shellfish in Eliot seeks to expand oyster farming operations. The Friends of Spinney Creek collected 400 signatures on a petition opposing the application.
Opinion: Transmission project a bad bet for Maine
Sun Journal - Friday, October 19, 2018 

New Hampshire said “no thanks” to the proposed Northern Pass project that would allow immense amounts of hydroelectric power to flow from Quebec to Southern New England. We encourage the Maine Public Utilities Commission to make the same decision. ReEnergy owns and operates four biomass-to-energy facilities in Maine (in Ashland, Fort Fairfield, Livermore Falls and Stratton) that generate 155 megawatts of electricity. All of these facilities would be negatively impacted by the NECEC. Hydro Quebec’s power would be first in line and the resulting congestion would limit the ability for Maine generators to deliver into the grid. ~ Mark Thibodeau, regional manager, ReEnergy Biomass Operations
Court temporarily stops youth climate suit days before trial
Associated Press - Friday, October 19, 2018 

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday temporarily blocked a high-profile climate change lawsuit brought by young activists who accuse the federal government of violating their constitutional rights. The young people say government officials have known for more than 50 years that carbon pollution from fossil fuels was causing climate change and that policies on oil and gas deprive them of life, liberty and property. They also say the government has failed to protect natural resources as a “public trust” for future generations. Administrations have tried unsuccessfully to get the case dismissed, but the Trump administration tried again before the Oct. 29 trial as the court shifted to the right with the confirmation this month of Brett Kavanaugh.
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