October 23, 2017  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Tree Farm Field Day, Sep 6
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 30, 2014 

Bambi Jones and Tracy Moskovitz, 2014 Maine and Northeast Regional Outstanding Tree Farmers, will host Maine Tree Farm Field Day. At Hidden Valley Nature Center, Jefferson, September 6, 8:50 am - 6 pm.
How Green Is Your Legislator?
Publication - Thursday, August 28, 2014 

The Maine Conservation Voters 2014 Environmental Scorecard rates all Maine legislators based on their votes on a range of key issues.
Maine Sierra Club Annual Dinner, Sep 5
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 28, 2014 

Featured speaker: U.S. Rep. Mike Michaud. At Maple Hill Farm Inn, Hallowell, Sep 5, 5:30 pm, $40.
Passenger Pigeons, Plovers & Puffins, Sep 4
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 28, 2014 

Doug Hitchcox, staff naturalist, and Laura Minich Zitske, Director of the Piping Plover & Least Tern Recovery Project, at Maine Audubon will discuss the extinction of the passenger pigeon and what you can do today to protect threatened and endangered species. At Gilsland Farm Audubon Center, Falmouth, September 4, 5:30 pm.
Wolfe's Neck Woods State Park Events
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 28, 2014 

Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park offers nature programs on weekends and holidays at 2 pm through September 30.
LWCF Turns 50, Sep 3
Announcement - Thursday, August 28, 2014 

Founded in 1964 to conserve America's natural and cultural heritage, the Land and Water Conservation Fund is dedicated to the conservation of our national parks, forests, wildlife refuges, wilderness areas and important historic sites, as well as development of state and local parks and protection of threatened and endangered species. LWCF, which is funded through off-shore gas royalties and not taxpayer dollars, strives to provide access for all Americans to their public lands. September 3, 2014, is the 50th anniversary of America's most important conservation program.
Maine Seaweed Festival, Aug 30
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 28, 2014 

The debut Maine Seaweed Festival, which celebrates the local seaweed industry, will be held at Southern Maine Community College, South Portland, Aug. 30, 11 am-5 pm.
The Changing Ocean Ecosystem, Aug 27
Announcement - Wednesday, August 27, 2014 

Maine Calling addresses the creatures great and small that thrive — and struggle — in the Gulf of Maine. Guests: Janet Gannon, marine biology lab instructor at Bowdoin College; Adam Baukus, research associate at Gulf of Maine Research Institute; and Joe Payne, Casco Baykeeper with the Friends of Casco Bay. Host: Jennifer Rooks. Maine Public Radio, August 27, 12-1 pm.
Transborder Land Protection Fund
Announcement - Tuesday, August 26, 2014 

Thanks to renewed support from the Partridge Foundation, the Open Space Institute is accepting grant proposals for the Transborder Land Protection Fund. In the face of an uncertain climate and potential development, it is critical to provide ecological options and pathways for plants and animals. OSI’s Transborder Land Protection Fund is focused on addressing these challenges in key wildlife linkages within the Northern Applachian ecoregion — among the most intact broadleaf temperate forests on Earth, which spans northern New England and maritime Canada.
National Parks Free Entrance, Aug 25
Announcement - Monday, August 25, 2014 

Only 133 of our country's 401 National Park System areas charge an entrance fee to help cover costs, but even that will be waived on the NPS birthday, Aug 25.
East-West Corridor Art Show
Action Alert - Monday, August 25, 2014 

An art exhibit in Northeast Harbor in support of opposition to the proposed East-West Corridor has ended, but you can still support the cause by purchasing art until November 19.
MST Poll: New Maine National Park
Action Alert - Sunday, August 24, 2014 

Maine Sunday Telegram Poll: Should a portion of Maine’s North Woods near Katahdin be turned into a national park?
Spirit Pond and Popham Beach, Aug 31
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 24, 2014 

Join Merrymeeting Audubon to the mid-coast’s best shorebirding location to wish the migrating shorebird flocks well on their journey south. Car Pool from Bath, August 31, 8 am - 12 noon.
Bickford Slides Hike, Aug 30
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 23, 2014 

A 3-mile hike with an elevation of 400 feet ends at a waterfall with an inviting pool below. At Evans Notch, White Mountains National Forest, August 30. Sponsored by Maine Sierra Club.
Lovely Lichens of Thorne Head Preserve, Aug 30
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 23, 2014 

Join Maine Master Naturalist Becky Kolak to discover the world of lichens- those unassuming organisms that are a combination of fungi and algae. At Thorne Head Preserve, Bath, Aug 30, 10 am - noon. Sponsored by Kennebec Estuary Land Trust.
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News Items
Developers: New Waste-To-Energy Plant in Hampden On Track For April Opening
Maine Public - Monday, October 23, 2017 

The developers of a new $69 million waste-to-energy plant in Hampden say steel for the 144,000-square-foot building is expected to arrive this week, and that plans are on track for an April 1 opening. Speaking to members of the Maine Resource Recovery Association in Brewer, Craig Stuart-Paul, CEO of Fiberight LLC, the company that will run the facility, said roadwork and other site preparation targets have been completed ahead of schedule.
200 Scientists Urge Congress To Maintain Science-Based Fisheries Management
Maine Public - Monday, October 23, 2017 

More than 200 scientists say Congress should protect federal sustainable fishing laws in advance of a key hearing about the future of the way the government manages fisheries. The Senate commerce committee is holding a hearing on Tuesday about reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. The act is the main law governing U.S. fisheries. The scientists sent a letter to Congress on Monday. They say they are opposed to "legislative efforts that would weaken science-based management of U.S. marine fish populations.''
Cool air, water won’t hold back these Maine paddlers
Bangor Daily News - Monday, October 23, 2017 

Mist crept over the still, cold water of Pushaw Stream, rising slowly to meet the first rays of sunlight. On the morning of Oct. 19, frost clung to the tall grasses edging the quiet waterway. A lone crow cried out, and Gudrun Keszöcze steared her red, battered canoe upstream. Comfortable in a winter hat, gloves and plenty of warm clothing, Keszöcze is one of many people in Maine who continue paddling throughout the fall, refusing to put up their boats until ice starts to form on the state’s many streams, rivers, lakes and ponds.
Take a Couple Days to Experience Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument
Portland Press Herald - Monday, October 23, 2017 

When Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument became a reality on the ground, I just had to get up there and take a good look around. Over four glorious days and three frosty nights last Veterans Day weekend, two companions and I did just that, on what I now consider one of the best multi-day backpacking treks in Maine. This is a backpacking trip you’ve got to do, be it this fall or next spring or summer. ~ Carey Kish
Rail-Trail Winter Wonderlands: Aroostook Valley Trail
Other - Monday, October 23, 2017 

Rails-to-Trails Conservancy - In northeastern Maine, not far from the Canadian border, the Aroostook Valley Trail offers a densely wooded, backcountry experience that snowmobilers will find appealing. The rail-trail travels 28 miles from Presque Isle to New Sweden and connects to the 61-mile Bangor–Aroostook Trail for an even longer ride. Cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and dog sledding are also popular on the trail during the winter months.
Changing ocean alters food web
Summit Voice - Monday, October 23, 2017 

Big fish eat little fish is the conventional wisdom of the sea, but it’s not always quite so simple. When Global warming and El Niño combined in 2015 and 2016 to warm the Pacific Ocean to new record-high temperatures, it shifted the food chain significantly, according to scientists with NOAA, the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. According to their new study, published in the journal Science Advances, the food web “changed in response to various natural and anthropogenic related stressors.”
Wardens Offer $2,500 Reward For Person Who Shot Bald Eagle
Associated Press - Monday, October 23, 2017 

Maine game wardens are searching for the person who shot and mortally wounded a young American bald eagle near a state park in Penobscot County earlier this month. The Maine Warden Service says the eagle was found by officials in a remote corner of Penobscot County northeast of Baxter State Park on Oct. 13. Wardens say the bird had been shot by a shotgun and was badly wounded. Officials had to put down the bald eagle. The Warden Service is offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to an arrest and conviction of the person responsible. Anyone with information is urged to contact officials.
Moose Hunting Open Again In Northern Maine This Week
Associated Press - Monday, October 23, 2017 

The Maine moose hunt is back open for a few days in the far northern part of the state. The moose hunt begins in September, lasts until late November and is broken up into four stretches. The third stretch begins on Monday and lasts until Oct. 28. It's limited mostly to four wildlife management districts that include northern Aroostook County. A district in eastern Maine that includes Grand Lake Stream and Indian Township is also open for hunting. The state gave out 2,080 moose permits this year, 60 fewer than 2016.
Here is where Maine stocked fish this year
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Monday, October 23, 2017 

If you chase stocked fish, you might want to check out this recent report, issued by the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. The report lists stocked waters by county, and even tells you how many fish and what species of fish were stocked. They also list the size of the stocked fish. You can read that report here.
Portland Democrats plagued by infighting weeks before election
Portland Press Herald - Monday, October 23, 2017 

The race for a Portland City Council seat among a trio of Democrats has split the city’s progressive activists, spawned a charge of collusion and led to an effort to oust the leader of the Democratic City Committee. Sixteen active members of the committee petitioned last week to remove Chairwoman Emily Figdor for taking sides in the race and for allegedly using the committee to pursue a “pet political project.” The mutiny against Figdor comes less than two weeks after her husband and fellow activist Steven Biel stepped down from the steering committee of Progressive Portland, a group he co-founded, after it became public that he was actively taking sides in the council race. [Figdor is former director of Environment Maine.]
Engine failure dimmed hopes of blockbuster season for Maine-Nova Scotia ferry
Portland Press Herald - Monday, October 23, 2017 

The Portland-Nova Scotia ferry carried more passengers in 2017 than it did the year before, but an engine failure disrupted its sailing schedule and dimmed expectations of a blockbuster season. The Cat ferry carried 41,463 passengers from Portland to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, between the end of May and Oct. 15, a 17 percent increase from the 35,500 passengers who took the ferry in 2016. Mark MacDonald, CEO of Bay Ferries, the Prince Edward Island-based company that operates the high-speed catamaran, said, “Based on our passenger bookings as they stood at that time, we were projecting to double our traffic this year over last year." Because of the engine failure, the ferry had to run at much slower speeds and cancel almost 25 percent of its sailing days.
Maine inventor’s device puts the wiggle back in dead bait fish
Portland Press Herald - Monday, October 23, 2017 

A Maine inventor is making a splash in the big-game fishing community with a mechanical lure that brings bait fish back from the dead. The product, appropriately named Zombait, is a hinged tube with a battery-powered motor inside that can be stuffed down the throat of dead bait to make it wiggle back and forth, simulating the swimming motion of a live fish. The idea is to trick big fish into thinking they’re going after live prey. Zombait is the brain child of entrepreneur and veteran tuna fisherman Rink Varian, who lives in Phippsburg.
Pipeline lawsuit divides candidates for District 2 council seat in South Portland
Portland Press Herald - Monday, October 23, 2017 

The city’s ongoing federal court battle with the Portland Pipe Line Corp. over a crude oil export ban is a defining issue in the two-way race for the District 2 City Council seat on Nov. 7. Christopher Breen and Kate Lewis are competing for a seat. Breen and Lewis have vastly different views of the so-called Clear Skies ordinance, which banned oil exports from South Portland’s waterfront and effectively blocked the pipeline company from reversing its flow to bring Canadian crude to its terminals on Portland Harbor. Breen said he opposes the Clear Skies ordinance and the money that’s being spent to defend it. Lewis called the Clear Skies ordinance a “strong product of work” that deserves the city’s best defense against the pipeline company’s lawsuit.
Letter: Pingree, Poliquin should join climate caucus
Morning Sentinel - Monday, October 23, 2017 

The Earth is warming. What can be argued is how much of this warming is due to natural earth cycles and how much is due to the effects of humans. But this doesn’t really matter. We do not know how to change the natural earth cycles, but we can reduce the impact on global warming that is caused by our high-carbon lifestyle. One of the most effective ways to reduce carbon dioxide production is through the marketplace with a bipartisan program called carbon fee and dividend. Please encourage your legislator, Reps. Chellie Pingree or Bruce Poliquin, to join the 50-plus legislators in the caucus and work with them to reduce global warming. ~ Paul Forman, Albion
Letter: Collins a clean energy champion
Bangor Daily News - Monday, October 23, 2017 

Maine has been a champion and the largest producer of renewable energy so it should be no surprise that Sen. Susan Collins has been chosen as a Clean Energy Champion because of her being a relentless advocate for clean energy over the years. She co-sponsored the Incentivizing Offshore Wind Power Act, which proposed to create an investment tax credit for offshore wind facilities. She supported the Bureau of Land Management’s methane recapture rule. She was a lead sponsor of an amendment to increase federal energy research and development investments, and to support efforts to preserve our air and climate. ~ Heather Reams, Citizens for Responsible Energy Solutions, Washington, D.C.
Months of little rain put Maine woods at high risk for wildfires
Portland Press Herald - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

There is a high risk for wildfires across more than half of Maine after months with little rain, according to the Maine Forest Service. The service’s Wildfire Danger Report, based on the National Fire Danger Rating System, says the current wildfire risk is “high” across southern and central Maine and as far north as Jackman to the west and Houlton to the east. Several brush fires were reported Sunday in Hancock County.
Pollution kills 9 million a year, costs $4.6 trillion, study finds
Associated Press - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Environmental pollution — from filthy air to contaminated water — is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. More than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. One out of every six premature deaths in the world in 2015 — about 9 million — could be attributed to disease from toxic exposure, according to a major study released Thursday. The financial cost from pollution-related death, sickness and welfare is equally massive, the report says, costing some $4.6 trillion in annual losses — or about 6.2 percent of the global economy.
Maine university getting more than $1 million for seaweed-to-energy
Associated Press - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

A Maine university is receiving more than $1.3 million from the federal government to develop methods for the U.S. to become a leader at utilizing seaweed for uses such as energy. The U.S. Department of Energy is giving the money to the University of New England over three years. The award is part of a program called Macroalgae Research Inspiring Novel Energy Resources, or “MARINER.” The university says the program aims to develop tools to enable the U.S. to become a leading producer of seaweed to help with energy security and economic competitiveness.
Why curing sick bats makes Maine a healthier place
Bangor Daily News - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Bats are often thought of as scary, dirty and disease-ridden, but they are lovely and fascinating to Ann Rivers. The 62-year-old Rivers runs Acadia Wildlife Center, one of two full-time state-licensed facilities in Maine that rehabilitates many kinds of wild animal but specializes in saving bats. She nurses about 50 ailing bats annually brought to her by game wardens and anybody else who finds them. The rehabilitation is an important part of maintaining a vital species, she said.
When Maine burned: How the monster Fire of ’47 tested the state’s resilience and altered its landscape
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

The walls of flames roared like tornadoes or locomotives across Maine’s wooded hillsides, devastating communities with a ferocity that didn’t distinguish between waterfront mansions or humble farmsteads. By the time rains finally fell on Oct. 29 – weeks after flames began popping up across the drought-stricken state – the fires had burned more than 200,000 acres, destroyed nearly 900 year-round homes, 400 seasonal houses and left an estimated 2,500 people homeless.
Possibility of another monster wildfire may not be as unlikely as you think
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Experts say a fire on the scale of the 1947 conflagration is less likely, given the improvements in communications, monitoring and firefighting equipment in Maine during the past 70 years. Maine’s wet climate, ecologically diverse forests and topography are different from that of many western states where massive spring- and summertime forest fires have unfortunately become the norm. Yet the late-fall fires near the Great Smoky Mountains in 2016 – which killed 14 and caused an estimated $500 million in damage in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, alone – underscored that large-scale, destructive forest fires are not merely a western problem.
Forest bathing catching on around coastal Maine
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Forest bathing – the practice of walking slowly through the woods to benefit from nature – came to Maine in the last year, but the certified guides who offer this therapy believe it will explode, much like yoga. Forest therapy involves meditative exercises interspersed through a three-hour slow walk through the woods. Every 20 or 30 minutes the guide suggests a new exercise, then to provide the opportunity to observe the forest and consider their thoughts or simply the tranquility in nature. Then the group convenes in a council to share what they learned.
You’re the boss when greening your home office
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

Here's how to conserve energy, paper and fuel, then recycle your equipment when its useful life is done.
New book encourages you to record your own observations of nature
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

“The Naturalist’s Notebook,” written by two superb Maine naturalists, is an all-around pleasure. The attractively designed volume combines practical guidance, lucid prose, and precise and charming illustrations with a systematic path to seeing and understanding the natural world more deeply. The illustrations are by Bernd Heinrich, who is one of the writers as well as an emeritus professor of biology at the University of Vermont. His co-author is Nathaniel Wheelwright, a Bowdoin professor of natural sciences.
Column: A carnivore tries to figure out how to cut down on her meat consumption
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, October 22, 2017 

I’m not giving up meat, but I am cutting back on the amount of meat I serve to my family. To be clear, it’s still an everyday thing. Ounce for ounce, there is just less of it. I’m shooting for half, to be exact. In my slow but steady progression to present meat as a flavorful condiment to vegetable-forward entrees, I am always on the lookout for cuts of meat flavorful enough and cooking techniques simple enough to easily push my reducetarian agenda forward. This week I’m working on shanks. ~ Christine Burns Rudalevige
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