July 21, 2017  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Eastport salmon fest, Sep 3-5
Event - Posted - Monday, August 30, 2010 

This year’s Eastport Salmon Festival has been moved up one week from its traditional date, and now is scheduled for Labor Day weekend, Sep 3-5.
America’s Great Outdoors Listening Session, Sep 2
Action Alert - Saturday, August 28, 2010 

Representatives of federal agencies are traveling the country to listen to ideas for conserving our lands and waters and reconnecting Americans to the outdoors. The AGO road show will be in Maine on Sep 2 at 3-6 p.m. at the Bangor Civic Center. Don’t miss this chance to speak for the need to expand public lands in Maine.
Viles Arboretum seeks volunteers
Announcement - Saturday, August 28, 2010 

The Viles Arboretum in Augusta is seeking volunteers to help teach environmental education programs to student, adult and family audiences all year long. Training and support will be provided by the arboretum’s new program director, Mark DesMeules.
Landscaping For Wildlife, Sep 4
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 28, 2010 

Learn about the wide selection of native shrubs, small trees and other plants that are hardy and attractive, while providing food and shelter for our birds and wildlife. At Maine Wildlife Park, Gray, Sep 4, 11 a.m.
Oh, Ranger! Story Tour, Sep 2-6
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 26, 2010 

Visitors to Acadia National Park are invited to share their experiences with American Park Network representatives, who will be in Bar Harbor as part of the Oh, Ranger! Story Tour from Sep 2 to 6. A team will record stories of visitors' experiences at Acadia. The program is part of a national initiative to collect stories to showcase the breadth and depth of America's parks as the National Park System approaches its 100th anniversary in 2016.
Healthy crops topic of UM gardening forum, Aug 31
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 26, 2010 

Gardeners of every ilk will get the chance to learn about maintaining healthy crops during a presentation by a University of Maine Cooperative Extension researcher at the UM Rogers Farm in Stillwater on Tuesday, Aug 31 at 6 p.m.
Maine State Duck Calling Championship, Aug 28
Event - Posted - Wednesday, August 25, 2010 

Cabela’s at 100 Cabela Boulevard, Scarborough, will host the Maine State Duck Calling Championship on Saturday, Aug 28.
Internet Trail Site for Franklin County
Announcement - Wednesday, August 25, 2010 

This new website offers information on 15 mountain biking, hiking, walking, cross-country skiing, and snow shoeing trails in Western Maine. More will be added.
Schoodic: Where Sea meets Land, Aug 28 & 29
Announcement - Tuesday, August 24, 2010 

This film is about the communities of Gouldsboro, Prospect Harbor, Corea and Winter Harbor, Maine. Maine Public TV, Aug 28 at 11:30 am and Aug 29 at 11:30 pm.
Open Garden Days, Aug 27
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 24, 2010 

The public is invited to join the Belfast Garden Club's Open Garden Days from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Aug. 27, at the Biebel Garden, 242 Fisher Road, Monroe. Visitors will discover a large organic experimental and eclectic vegetable and flower garden with soil that never needs to be plowed or rototilled due to its rich start as a "lasagna-method" garden.
Walks, talk focus on history of St. George River canals
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 21, 2010 

The Georges River Land Trust and Montpelier: General Henry Knox Museum are co-sponsoring three free events focused on the history of the canals along the St. George River in Warren and Searsmont. On Monday, Aug 30, two guided walks will be held. Knox's efforts in constructing the canal will be the subject of the third event, an evening lecture by Mendoza at Montpelier on Sep 1 at 7 p.m.
Maine Woodsman Day, Aug 28
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 21, 2010 

See demonstrations of wildlife carving, including with chainsaws, and hatchet-throwing. At Maine Wildlife Park, Gray, August 28, 11 a.m.
Mushroom talk at Belfast library, Aug 31
Event - Posted - Friday, August 20, 2010 

On Aug 31 at 6:30 p.m., Belfast Free Library will host a talk titled "Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms of New England and Eastern Canada" by David Spahr.
Palermo Preserve walk, Aug 26
Event - Posted - Friday, August 20, 2010 

Professional forester and lands director for the Sheepscot Valley Conservation Association, Tish Carr will lead a nature walk at 10 a.m. on Aug 26 around the Palermo Preserve.
Astronomer illuminates concerns about dimming starshine, Aug 27
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 19, 2010 

If the stars don't look as bright as they did when we were children, it might not be that stars have lost their sparkle. It could be that we have lost our night. On Friday, Aug. 27 at 7 p.m., aerospace engineer and astronomer Peter Lord will appear at the Oceanview Grange south of Tenants Harbor. He will use satellite images to illustrate the amazing effect of night lighting around the earth.
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News Items
George Smith and the Quest for a Most Favorite Fly
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Tuesday, July 18, 2017 

I made my first trip to our camp at Camp Phoenix on Memorial Day weekend of 1991. George came for his first weekend the following week. That gave me one week’s head start in discovering what fly might work on the lake at that time. George spent much time before his trip collecting what seemed to be every trout fly commercially available in the State of Maine. ~ Jim Hynson
With diners prizing Maine oysters, farming them booms along coast
Portland Press Herald - Tuesday, July 18, 2017 

The cold saltwater along Maine’s coast harbors a growing oyster industry that is riding the bivalves’ blossoming popularity and the state’s reputation for quality seafood. Experts predict that the industry, which had a record year in 2016, could triple in size within the next dozen years.
Opinion: Portland task force’s pesticide ordinance is full of loopholes
Portland Press Herald - Tuesday, July 18, 2017 

Anyone who has followed the Portland City Council task force deliberations on a pesticide ordinance over the last year has to have been encouraged by the strong showing at a June 21 hearing. Residents testifying in favor of the most protective regulations – namely, the provisos of an ordinance enacted by South Portland last year – outnumbered by 5 to 1 supporters of the chemical industry-friendly draft ordinance from the Portland task force. The task force ordinance, which purports to be based on integrated pest management practices and to ban synthetic pesticides on public and private land, is replete with loopholes that allow insecticides, herbicides and fungicides to be used if “the pest population exceeds acceptable safety, economic or aesthetic threshold levels.” ~ Jody Spear, Portland Protectors
Opinion: Lawmakers should sustain Gov. LePage’s veto of solar bill
Portland Press Herald - Tuesday, July 18, 2017 

Legislators who want to move Maine’s energy policy forward should support Gov. LePage’s veto of L.D. 1504, An Act To Modernize Rates for Small-scale Distributed Generation. Despite the title’s promise, the bill locks in an outdated and expensive subsidy for the businesses that install private solar systems. It also unfairly shifts costs to everyone who pays an electric bill and delays opportunities for solar energy to make a more meaningful difference for Maine’s environment and economy. ~ Sara Burns, president and CEO, Central Maine Power
Letter: Plastic buoys a threat to ocean health
Bangor Daily News - Tuesday, July 18, 2017 

I first noticed the use of large plastic buoys in the early 2000s. Since then harbors have filled up with them and salmon pens are encircled by their bright yellow domes. Each one is stuffed with tiny pellets. Big, light, with excellent flotation, these buoys are a fine choice over the rusting metal buoys and inflatable rubber moorings that can be found wrenched off their traces, high ashore islands and bluffs. But they are not as tough as the ultraviolet rays that chew up plastic. Now they are falling apart, escaping their bonds and casting toxic pellets far and wide. Many of these buoys are on the verge of deterioration and present imminent danger to the health of the ocean and marine wildlife. ~ Charles A. Kniffen, Lubec
Popular viewpoint and orchards preserved in York County
Portland Press Herald - Monday, July 17, 2017 

More than 240 acres of fields, apple orchards and forestland on Goat Hill in Acton will be permanently preserved for agriculture after Three Rivers Land Trust, Maine Farmland Trust, and the town worked together to protect it from future development. The hilltop, a favorite destination for residents of western York County, offers views of the ocean, lakes and Mount Washington. The orchards have produced apples for the wholesale market for 80 years.
Maine tourism industry says more foreign help better late than never
Bangor Daily News - Monday, July 17, 2017 

The head of Maine’s trade group for hotels and restaurants praised a federal decision to allow more foreign workers into the country, but said it’s too late for much of the industry to recover its losses. Steve Hewins, head of the Maine Innkeepers Association and the Maine Restaurant Association, said the Trump Administration’s move “is definitely too late in the season for many business that will not be able to recover their earlier losses, but we are grateful that they finally heard our pleas and acted – even on this limited basis.”
Lobster Industry Grapples with Climate Change
Other - Monday, July 17, 2017 

Fisherman's Voice - Maine’s lobster fishery has sustained many local communities for well over 100 years, persisting when other fisheries have either declined or crashed. But some interesting times for the American lobster could be coming. What that means for the future in these uncertain times is unclear. That was the thought among Maine-based speakers at the 11th International Conference on Lobster Biology and Management, hosted in Portland from June 4-9.
Maine’s Pulp and Paper Industry
Other - Monday, July 17, 2017 

Fisherman's Voice - Maine’s papermaking industry expanded at a rapid pace and by 1890 Maine had 25 different operating paper mills. Today, Maine faces competition not only from other U.S. states and Canada, but also new mills in Europe that came online beginning in the 1980s and that trend continued into the 1990s. After that, Brazil and Chile, with their vast forests, began building new mills and these put a severe crimp on Maine’s share of the pie. Also, Asia is building new pulping facilities at a rapid rate. Many of Maine’s mills have had no option but to shutter their doors.
Federal officials order 15,000 new visas for low-wage seasonal workers
Washington Post - Monday, July 17, 2017 

The Department of Homeland Security on Monday announced a one-time increase of 15,000 additional visas for low-wage, seasonal workers for the remainder of this fiscal year, a seeming about-face from President Trump’s “Hire American” rhetoric, following heavy lobbying from the fisheries, hospitality and other industries that rely on temporary foreign workers. The increase represents a 45 percent bump from the number of H-2B visas normally issued for the second half of the fiscal year. The visas are for workers taking seasonal jobs in the seafood, tourism and other industries but not farm laborers. Representatives in Maine’s tourism industry have said thousands of applications have been held up in processing, leaving many coastal destinations short-handed this season.
Adorable mouse is to blame for the spread of Lyme disease
Washington Post - Monday, July 17, 2017 

White-footed mice — known for their wide eyes and ears, long tails and snow-white bellies and the feet from which they get their name — are often overlooked by humans, hiding out by the billions in U.S. forests, shrubby thickets and even wooded wetlands. But there’s one creature that knows them well: the tick. Scientists say white-footed mice, which are primary carriers of the Lyme bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, are a highly popular host of black-legged ticks, which consequently makes them a key culprit in the spread of Lyme disease.
Maine campground takes ‘glamping’ to a new level
Aislinn Sarnacki Act Out Blog - Monday, July 17, 2017 

The new Sandy Pines Campground in Kennebunkport opened last month with the unveiling of 12 unique tents, designed by 12 different New England designers and stocked with bedding, mini fridges, bath amenities, heaters and fans. For people who aren’t sure they’re ready for the rusticities of camping, this is a step in that direction. Sort of. It’s “glamping” — or glamorous camping — in its finest form.
64 more Atlantic salmon reach Milford; Season total at 786
John Holyoke Out There Blog - Monday, July 17, 2017 

For nearly 40 years, biologists have counted the Atlantic salmon that return to the Penobscot River each year. Late last week, marine resource scientist Jason Valliere sent along some good news: Valliere said that 64 new salmon were caught at Milford last week, bringing the total yearly count to 786. Of those, 280 were grilse; the remainder were older, multi-sea-winter fish. And as of July 14, 42 of those multi-sea-winter fish and 223 of the grilse had been released upstream of Milford. Another highlight: The first shortnose sturgeon of the year was also caught at Milford. It was released back into the water downstream of the dam.
Fish Fight: Managers Say NJ Flounder Flap Harms Conservation
Associated Press - Monday, July 17, 2017 

Interstate fishing managers say a row with a Trump administration appointee over the regulation of flounder fishing off New Jersey jeopardizes conservation of marine species all along the East Coast. The flatfish in question is summer flounder, which is popular with sport fishermen and commercial fishermen from Maine to Florida. The regulatory Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission announced in June that it had found the state of New Jersey out of compliance with management of the fishery. But Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross needed to sign off on the ruling, and he instead reversed it. An Atlantic States spokeswoman says Ross's ruling is extremely rare and has the potential to soften the commission's regulatory authority.
'It's Raining Needles': Drug Crisis Creates Pollution Threat
National Public Radio - Monday, July 17, 2017 

Increasing numbers of discarded needles from drug users are turning up in cities and towns across the country, finding their way into rivers, parks and onto beaches. In Portland, Maine, officials have collected more than 700 needles so far this year, putting them on track to handily exceed the nearly 900 gathered in all of 2016.
Natural Gas Building Boom Fuels Climate Worries, Enrages Landowners
National Public Radio - Monday, July 17, 2017 

They landed, one after another, in 2015: plans for nearly a dozen interstate pipelines to move natural gas beneath rivers, mountains and people's yards. Like spokes on a wheel, they'd spread from Appalachia to markets in every direction. Together these new and expanded pipelines — comprising 2,500 miles of steel in all — would double the amount of gas that could flow out of Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. But some scientists warn that the rush to more fully tap the rich Marcellus and Utica shales is bad for a dangerously warming planet, extending the country's fossil-fuel habit by half a century.
Why aren’t there salmon in Salmon Brook?
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Monday, July 17, 2017 

erhaps you are wondering why there are no salmon in Aroostook County’s Salmon Brook, a tributary of the Aroostook River which once sported lots and lots of Atlantic salmon. Well, wonder no more. Cast your line here, for two interesting articles about this issue, written by Lloyd Irland, a forestry consultant who lives in Wayne. From clear cuts to pollution to food processing plants to dams, the story is not a good one. And in the mid to late 1800s, tributaries were turned into sluiceways for logs, ruining fish spawning habitat. But a highly regarded fisheries biologist argues this can all be fixed.
Libra’s Piscataquis County revitalization plans include indoor sports complex
Bangor Daily News - Monday, July 17, 2017 

A nonprofit foundation is building a community recreation complex on West Main Street as part of its $10 million plan to revitalize Piscataquis County. The Libra Foundation plans to transform a former auto dealership into an indoor recreation facility with an attached ice rink, Libra Foundation CEO Craig Denekas said. The news comes after the foundation in October kicked off efforts to transform Monson, about 15 miles northwest, into an artists colony. The foundation’s goal in both towns: To turn Piscataquis, which the U.S. Census Bureau rated as Maine’s poorest county in 2015, into a center for tourism, recreation and agriculture.
Forest Bathing: A Retreat To Nature Can Boost Immunity And Mood
National Public Radio - Monday, July 17, 2017 

The aim of forest bathing is to slow down and become immersed in the natural environment. The practice began in Japan in the early 1990s. Now, forest bathing is starting to take off in the U.S. The Associations of Nature & Forest Therapy plans to train and certify about 250 new guides next year. The idea that spending time in nature is good for our health is not new. Most of human evolutionary history was spent in environments that lack buildings and walls. Our bodies have adapted to living in the natural world. But today most of us spend much of our life indoors, or at least tethered to devices. Perhaps the new forest bathing trend is a recognition that many of us need a little nudge to get back out there.
Opinion: Expanded deep-freezing facility would heat up local, state economy
Portland Press Herald - Monday, July 17, 2017 

I’ve witnessed the decline of groundfish landings at the Portland Fish Exchange, from 30 million pounds per year in the early 1990s to about 3 million pounds annually since 2015. Despite this steady decline, Portland seafood processors have been able to maintain production, sales and jobs by supplementing fresh fish with frozen fish. These processors not only use frozen seafood products but also create ready-to-prepare frozen lobster tails, lobster meat, fish fillets and minimally processed seafood that require a local, deep-freeze storage facility. They are forced to truck seafood to deep-freeze facilities in Massachusetts and back again to Maine. Western Promenade abutters say they do not support cold storage at the capacity proposed. But a smaller capacity is not economically viable. ~ Bert Jongerden, general manager, Portland Fish Exchange and harbor commissioner for the Port of Portland
Opinion: Bass clubs stewards of Maine lakes
Kennebec Journal - Monday, July 17, 2017 

Each year, almost 300 bass tournaments take place on Maine’s inland waters between April and November. Many bass clubs, such as the Man vs. Bass Maine Trail, not only run tournaments for club members, but also participate in programs for getting youth involved in fishing. According to the Man vs. Bass Maine Trail tournament director, Corey Vose, the club spends one week each year at the Bryant Pond 4-H camp, teaching kids how to fish and about being good stewards of the lakes. Many other bass clubs in Maine also donate their time to youth fishing and fishing tournaments for disabled veterans. ~ Toni Pied, Belgrade Regional Conservation Alliance
'Dirt Is Good': Why Kids Need Exposure To Germs
National Public Radio - Sunday, July 16, 2017 

Jack Gilbert is the co-author of a new book called "Dirt is Good: The Advantage of Germs for Your Child's Developing Immune System." Presented in a Q&A format, the book seeks to answer many of the questions Gilbert has fielded from parents over the years.
Physically disabled persons praise, question access to Acadia
Acadia On My Mind Blog - Sunday, July 16, 2017 

During a recent visit to Acadia National Park, Shirley Beck, who has multiple sclerosis, said she was “very pleased” to find a paved path that allowed her to reach a viewing platform at the Cadillac Mountain summit with her light three-wheel electric scooter. Beck, who visited Acadia while traveling with her husband, Roy, on a cruise ship, said she was not able to get quite as full of an experience at another key Acadia landmark, Thunder Hole. An accessible ramp leads to the upper viewing area of Thunder Hole for physically disabled persons, but not down to the lower area next to the sea cavern itself.
Eves promises ‘a campaign of hope’ in gubernatorial run
Foster's Daily Democrat - Sunday, July 16, 2017 

Former House Speaker and gubernatorial candidate Mark Eves agrees he is in a crowded field of five Democrats running in next June’s primary, but he said it doesn’t faze him. Eves cites jobs, health care and the environment as three primary pillars of his platform.
Maine’s agricultural museums provide a glimpse of farming from long ago
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 16, 2017 

Farming isn’t an easy life, but in many ways today’s farmers have it better than the hardscrabble folks who settled this state a couple of centuries ago. Sometimes it’s good to glance in the rearview mirror to see how far we’ve come. Maine has several good agricultural museums that will let you do just that. Here’s a sampling.
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Art and Land Conservation Symposium
at Colby College, August 3-4

Frederic E. Church, 
Mount Katahdin from Millinocket Camp, 1895, 
Portland Museum of Art

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