May 23, 2018  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Growth in Land-Based Salmon Production, May 31
Event - Posted - Thursday, May 24, 2018 

Joseph Hankins, Director of The Conservation Fund’s Freshwater Institute will talk about why a national land conservation organization is involved in Recirculating Aquaculture Systems. At Schoodic Institute,
Winter Harbor, May 31, 7 pm.
Maine Environmental News
Announcement - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond). We have posted summaries and links to over 50,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Slaughtering grizzly bears
Action Alert - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

On May 23, Wyoming officials approved the first hunt in decades for grizzly bears that wander out of Yellowstone National Park. As many as 22 could be shot and killed this fall, including pregnant females. Yellowstone's grizzlies, famous around the world, are national treasures. Slaughtering them is like defacing the Statue of Liberty or filling in the Grand Canyon. ~ Center for Biological Diversity
Invasive fish, May 30
Event - Posted - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

George Smith will discuss the impact invasive fish are having on Maine’s native fish. At Mount Vernon Community Center, May 30, 7 pm. Sponsored by 30 Mile Watershed Association.
Drowning with Others, May 30
Event - Posted - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

John Anderson, Professor of Ecology/Natural History at College of the Atlantic, argues for developing a broad coalition to help conserve Maine’s seabird islands from sea level rise. At Wells Reserve at Lajudholm, May 30, 6 pm.
Join the fight for Maine's clean energy future
Action Alert - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

In Maine, we are seeing the damaging effects of climate change firsthand: tick borne illnesses like Lyme disease are on the rise, the warming Gulf of Maine threatens our marine economy, air pollution drives up asthma rates for kids and adults, and extreme weather impacts our outdoor recreation and farming industries. The technology to turn off dirty fossil fuels already exists. What is standing in the way of our clean energy future? Politicians who are bought and paid for by the oil and gas industry. ~ Maine Conservation Voters
Defining Wilderness: Defining Maine, May 29 - Jul 24
Event - Posted - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

The Maine State Library is offering a free reading and discussion group with copies of books available through the library. The series, Defining Wilderness: Defining Maine, runs for 5 sessions, May 29 - July 24, at the State Library in Augusta. Books to be discussed include "The Maine Woods" by Henry David Thoreau.
Bats, May 29
Event - Posted - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

Biologist Trevor Peterson will speak about local species of bats. At Topsham Public Library, May 29, 6 pm. Sponsored by Cathance River Education Alliance.
“Living within Limits” Teen Environmental Poster Contest
Announcement - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

The Teen Library Council of the Patten Library in Bath and Brunswick-based Manomet are sponsoring an environmental poster contest for middle and high school students. Posters should promote actions that help sustain the planet and reduce our environmental footprint. Deadline: June 1.
Sign-Up to Count Fish at Nequasset
Announcement - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

The annual alewife count at the Nequasset Fish Ladder in Woolwich is happening. Join the fun by signing up to count during any two 10 minute blocks within a two hour period.
Wilderness Under Siege, May 30
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Nationally known author and explorer George Wuerthner will discuss the challenges facing Wilderness, how people can better protect the Wildernesses in their backyards and around the country, and organizing against efforts to weaken or repeal the Wilderness Act. At Curtis Library, Brunswick, May 30, 6:30 pm.
Farmer Talent Show & Open Mic, May 27
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

The first annual Farmer Talent Show & Open Mic will benefit the Market’s Harvest Bucks program, which increases access to fruit and vegetables for low-income households. At East Madison Grange, May 27, 5-8 pm.
White Mountains Centennial exhibition, May 27
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

The Museums of the Bethel Historical Society host a preview reception of the new displays, “White Mountain National Forest: A Centennial Exhibition” and “The White Mountains: Alps of New England.” At Robinson House, Bethel, May 27, 2-5 pm.
Field Trip: Capt. Fitzgerald Preserve and Bay Bridge, May 27
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Explore two town-owned properties in Brunswick for breeding and migrant birds: Fitzgerald Preserve and Bay Bridge Wetland Park on the Androscoggin River. May 27, 6:30 – 11 am. Sponsored by Merrymeeting Audubon.
Walk on the Wild Side, May 26
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 19, 2018 

Turner Public Library’s summer programming begins with a nature walk. At Androscoggin Riverlands State Park, May 26, 2 pm.
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News Items
Editorial: Single-use bags are a deadly habit we need to break
Journal Tribune - Friday, November 30, 2012 

The era of the plastic shopping bag is coming to an end, and not a moment too soon. Earlier this month, Brookline, Mass. became the second community in that state to ban plastic shopping bags, joining Nantucket, which instated a ban more than 20 years ago. Now a statewide ban is being sought, and we hope Maine considers following Massachusetts’ lead. Let’s take a cue from our neighbor to the south and embrace a plastic bag ban in Maine, to protect the environment and its wildlife and move away from this harmful throw-away culture.
BIW to resume Kennebec dredging
Coastal Journal - Friday, November 30, 2012 

Bath Iron Works has applied for multiple permits to resume dredging operations in the Kennebec River sometime in the next few months. According to the public notice released by the US Army Corps of Engineers, the permits are asking for permission to complete three separate projects.
Kennebec River barge crew bores test soil samples for Maine Natural Gas pipeline
Kennebec Journal - Friday, November 30, 2012 

A crew hired by Maine Natural Gas, one of the two firms competing to bring natural gas to customers in Augusta and the Kennebec region, took test borings in the Kennebec River this week to sample the soil below, determining the proper location and depth for its pipeline to cross the river. Officials with competitor Summit Natural Gas of Maine agree bringing natural gas to the region is fast becoming a reality, but they want to be the ones bringing the gas. Summit insists it will bring gas to far more people and will provide a larger financial boost to a much wider area.
Following public input, Searsport will decide next year whether tank can be built
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 30, 2012 

While public hearings on DCP Midstream’s application to build a 138-foot-tall, 23-million-gallon liquid propane tank continued for a fifth night Friday, the planning board’s actual deliberations on the project won’t start until next year. Bruce Probert, longtime chairman of the volunteer town board, who has been praised by those on both sides of the contentious issue for being fair and forbearing, said he wants the general public to have a good understanding of the project.
Trans-Tech delivers pneumatic wood pellet truck to Maine Energy Systems
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 30, 2012 

As Mainers use more wood pellets as an alternative to heating oil for their winter warmth, there is a growing demand for bulk deliveries of wood pellets. Bulk delivery has been problematic because of the amount of damage done to the product during the transport and delivery process, but a company in Brewer has designed a new kind of delivery truck for that purpose. Trans-Tech Industries of Brewer, which designed and created an air-driven prototype delivery system for a truck for Maine Energy Systems of Bethel that has been in use for more than a year, on Monday delivered a second, upgraded version of the pneumatic truck that is larger and faster.
Allagash crews accomplished much in 2012
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 30, 2012 

In addition to several other projects, the 15-year management plan for the Allagash Wilderness Waterway has been moving forward. During the past year, Division of Parks and Public Lands staff have met with stakeholders and held public meetings on the plan. The plan has been revised several times in an effort to meet the concerns raised at these meetings. Hopefully, by the time this column is published, the new plan that will guide management of the waterway over the next 15 years will have been approved by the Commissioner of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.
Electronic-Waste Recycling
Maine Environmental News - Friday, November 30, 2012 

A new case study has been issued by the Natural Resources Council of Maine of Maine’s Product Stewardship program, which recycles e-waste. The review says the producer-funded recycling program for electronics has kept millions of pounds of lead and other toxins out of Maine's air, land, and water. And it reduces local taxes, creates jobs, and spurs Maine’s clean-tech economy.
National Geographic scouts Maine for birding show
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 30, 2012 

Rich MacDonald, a field ecologist and enthusiastic birdwatcher from Bar Harbor, is helping television producers find Maine birders who could end up appearing on a show planned for the National Geographic Channel. The show is still in development and does not have a name, MacDonald said Friday, but the concept is to feature enthusiastic birders as they go out looking for various types of birds.
U.S. Offers East Coast Waters for Wind Farms
Wall Street Journal - Friday, November 30, 2012 

The U.S. will offer up federal acreage off the coasts of Virginia, Massachusetts and Rhode Island for offshore wind farms during the first half of 2013 the Interior Department said Friday. The competitive lease sales will be the first held under an Obama administration initiative to fast-track permitting for offshore wind farms. None of the expensive projects have been built yet in the U.S.
New preserve takes shape at Harpswell Cove
Times Record - Friday, November 30, 2012 

The Harpswell Land Trust will proceed with a comprehensive plan to establish a multi-acre conservation area and wildlife preserve on a portion of Hildreth Road overlooking Harpswell Cove. Members of the Harpswell Board of Selectmen gave the organization its approval Thursday night.
Opinion: Maine needs leaders in Washington to support the Safe Chemicals Act
Portland Press Herald - Friday, November 30, 2012 

The outdated Toxic Substances Control Act stacks the deck against people and the environment by hamstringing the federal government's ability to get information about chemical safety and to protect us from the most harmful chemicals. Maine has been a leader in passing laws to get toxic chemicals out of products in our state. But we still need federal chemicals policy reform to really make substantial progress, and such a bill has been introduced in Congress: the Safe Chemicals Act. Now we need lawmakers who will work together to protect people and the environment, and who will not cater to the influence of powerful chemical companies. ~ Lisa Pohlmann, Natural Resources Council of Maine
Maine scientist relishes discovery of lobster-eat-lobster world
Portland Press Herald - Friday, November 30, 2012 

One minute, Noah Oppenheim was firing up his camera on the ocean floor just off Pemaquid Point in the midcoast of Maine. The next, he was the first human witness to an underwater crime in progress. "I was blown away," Oppenheim, 25, said during a break this week at The American Lobster in a Changing Ecosystem, a four-day symposium of marine scientists at the Holiday Inn by the Bay in Portland. "I had no idea this was coming -- absolutely no idea." He's talking about lobsters eating their young. At night, when nobody's looking.
Letter: Fishy info about salmon?
Bangor Daily News - Friday, November 30, 2012 

The Yankee Chef in the BDN on Nov. 21 states that he uses “wild Atlantic salmon because the flavor is twice that of farm-raised.” Wild Atlantic salmon in Maine are an endangered species. Commercial harvest of sea-run salmon (Salmo salar) in Maine ended in 1947, when weir fishermen in the Penobscot River caught a grand total of 40 fish. Recreational angling for salmon is prohibited because of their endangered status. Commercial salmon fishing is banned in Atlantic Canada and Greenland. Wild Atlantic salmon are not available in retail markets. Salmon available to Maine consumers is either farm-raised Atlantic salmon (some of which is grown in Maine and eastern Canada) or wild Alaskan salmon. ~ Catherine Schmitt, Maine Sea Grant College Program, Bangor
Study: Like a tree, growth rings show lobster age
Associated Press - Friday, November 30, 2012 

For the first time, scientists have figured out how to determine the age of a lobster — by counting its rings in the eyestalk, like a tree. Nobody knows how old lobsters can live to be; some people estimate they live to more than 100. But knowing — rather than simply guessing — their age and that of other shellfish could help scientists better understand the population and assist regulators of the lucrative industry.
Letter: Nothing to lose by acting as if warming a real threat
Portland Press Herald - Friday, November 30, 2012 

In a letter to the editor ("Proactive view of climate change needed," Nov. 12), Lee Chisholm of Freeport asks, "Should we not now be demanding a clarion call from our political leaders ... to come together and act so as to steer clear of a future full of further droughts, fires, floods and Hurricane Sandys? At the very least, should we not be talking?" Whether you accept the reality of climate change or not, what do we have to lose in reducing greenhouse gas emissions now in order to alleviate future deleterious impacts to humans, other life forms and the planet? ~ Bronda Niese, Woolwich
Legendary guide introduced hundreds to Allagash wilderness
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Over 24 years — until his retirement from teaching in 1994 — Gil Gilpatrick taught scores of high school-age students how to build things like strip canoes, snowshoes, and snowshoe-themed furniture. Each year, he took a group of his senior on a weeklong adventure in the Allagash Wilderness Waterway. He wrote books explaining how to do the many things he had mastered, which were absorbed by generations of outdoors enthusiasts. During his summers off, he guided paying customers down the Allagash, sometimes with his wife, other times with one of his daughters. Eventually, Gilpatrick’s name became inexorably linked with that special northern Maine waterway that he loves.
Salmon returns ‘dismal’ on Penobscot, elsewhere
John Holyoke Out There Blog - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Those who keep an eager eye turned toward the Veazie Dam were left shaking their heads as Atlantic salmon returns to the Penobscot River lagged far behind the pace set during a banner 2011 season. The final Penobscot salmon total: 624 fish — the second lowest since the trap went into operation in 1978.
Residents, property owners share worries about property value loss if Searsport tank is built
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

A near-capacity crowd listened carefully Thursday night as panels composed of project neighbors, business owners and Islesboro residents outlined their deep concerns about the proposed liquid propane gas terminal and storage tank that a Denver company wants to build at the Mack Point industrial zone. It was the Searsport Planning Board’s fourth of five public hearings scheduled to take place this week. The worries that some of those neighbors and residents discussed Thursday included a major anticipated drop in property value, a depressed housing market, far fewer tourists than usual, safety concerns, light pollution and more. The $40 million, 23 million-gallon project would include a tank that would stretch 138 feet high and about 200 feet wide.
Chefs, fishermen help with events to promote Maine’s under-loved fish
Reuters - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

What would it take to turn mackerel into a household name? Or whiting? That’s what scientists at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, in partnership with local fisherman and area chefs, are hoping to find out. To start, they will be tempting New England diners in the months ahead with lesser-known Maine species. Researchers spent the summer and fall organizing “Out of the Blue” test events at several dozen regional restaurants and colleges, including Bowdoin, Bates and Boston University.
Portland symposium addresses climate change’s effects on lobster fishery
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Scientists from throughout the northeastern United States and Atlantic Canada, and even a few from Europe, are gathered in Portland this week to discuss the venerable Homarus americanus, also known as the American lobster. According to Rick Wahle, a research associate professor in UMaine’s School of Marine Sciences and one of the co-chairmen of the symposium’s steering committee, “We’re at a remarkable juncture in the history of the lobster resource right now. On the one hand, we have this surge in lobster population we’ve never seen before in the Gulf of Maine, [but] as you go to southern New England, it’s a collapsing fishery — and the causes may be the same.” One of those causes, Wahle said, may be climate change.
Lincoln shavings mill to get $200,000 grant for air cleanup
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

One of the town’s oldest businesses will get a $200,000 federal grant by January to help it diversify its manufacturing base and end a smoke problem that has bedeviled neighbors. Haskell Lumber Inc. and its manufacturing arm, LMJ Enterprises LLC, has qualified for a federal Community Development Block Grant. The grant will pay half of the estimated $300,000 to $500,000 cost of installing a filtration unit that will clean the air coming from LMJ’s wood-shavings mill.
CMP: No Negative Effects from Iberdrola Credit Downgrade
Maine Public Broadcasting Network - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Central Maine Power says its finances - and its customers - will be spared any negative fallout from the recent credit downgrade suffered by Spanish parent company Iberdrola. Standard and Poor's, one of the three big ratings agencies, lowered Iberdrola's credit grade late Wednesday to two notches above junk bond status, due to turmoil in Spain's economy and the company's ongoing debt struggles. But at the same time, the ratings agency has also affirmed CMP's credit rating.
Harsh Weather, Knee Injuries Didn't Stop Filmmaker from Chasing Glaciers
Other - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

PBS - After five years spent documenting the behavior of glaciers, photographer James Balog has concluded that the term "glacial pace" is an oxymoron. "Glaciers are very fast-moving characters," Balog said. "They respond on an hourly, daily and weekly basis to the weather conditions around them." In his documentary, "Chasing Ice," Balog chronicled the effect of climate change on glaciers, using 34 time-lapse cameras at 16 glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, the Nepalese Himalaya, Alaska and the U.S. Rocky Mountains. The pictures are stunning and provide a vivid picture of what's occurring in the icy part of the world.
First Wind seeks Monson’s input on pending energy project
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

A representative of First Wind, a wind energy company based in Boston, met with municipal officials on Nov. 20 about the company’s plans to run an electrical transmission power line through the town. Project Engineer David Fowler discussed with the planning board and selectmen the company’s plan to link high-tension transmission lines from its wind towers in Bingham, Mayfield and Kingsbury to a Central Maine Power substation in Parkman. First Wind’s plan calls for the transmission lines to run through Monson. The firm needs to obtain a right-of-way through town in order to achieve its goal. The town currently has a moratorium against such power projects.
How New England Can Eliminate Oil Use For Single Family Homes for Less Than We're Spending on Solar PV
Other - Thursday, November 29, 2012 

Alt Energy Stocks - We can use simple, effective, and proven policies that have been used to supercharge the New England solar PV industry to incentivize renewable thermal technologies and eliminate oil use for single family homes. Here's the best part, the policies will be cheaper than solar PV, they will create more local jobs per kW installed and displace more expensive fuel. ~ Chris Williams
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