May 24, 2018  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Growth in Land-Based Salmon Production, May 31
Event - Posted - Thursday, May 24, 2018 

Joseph Hankins, Director of The Conservation Fund’s Freshwater Institute will talk about why a national land conservation organization is involved in Recirculating Aquaculture Systems. At Schoodic Institute,
Winter Harbor, May 31, 7 pm.
Maine Environmental News
Announcement - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond). We have posted summaries and links to over 50,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Slaughtering grizzly bears
Action Alert - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

On May 23, Wyoming officials approved the first hunt in decades for grizzly bears that wander out of Yellowstone National Park. As many as 22 could be shot and killed this fall, including pregnant females. Yellowstone's grizzlies, famous around the world, are national treasures. Slaughtering them is like defacing the Statue of Liberty or filling in the Grand Canyon. ~ Center for Biological Diversity
Invasive fish, May 30
Event - Posted - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

George Smith will discuss the impact invasive fish are having on Maine’s native fish. At Mount Vernon Community Center, May 30, 7 pm. Sponsored by 30 Mile Watershed Association.
Drowning with Others, May 30
Event - Posted - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

John Anderson, Professor of Ecology/Natural History at College of the Atlantic, argues for developing a broad coalition to help conserve Maine’s seabird islands from sea level rise. At Wells Reserve at Lajudholm, May 30, 6 pm.
Join the fight for Maine's clean energy future
Action Alert - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

In Maine, we are seeing the damaging effects of climate change firsthand: tick borne illnesses like Lyme disease are on the rise, the warming Gulf of Maine threatens our marine economy, air pollution drives up asthma rates for kids and adults, and extreme weather impacts our outdoor recreation and farming industries. The technology to turn off dirty fossil fuels already exists. What is standing in the way of our clean energy future? Politicians who are bought and paid for by the oil and gas industry. ~ Maine Conservation Voters
Defining Wilderness: Defining Maine, May 29 - Jul 24
Event - Posted - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

The Maine State Library is offering a free reading and discussion group with copies of books available through the library. The series, Defining Wilderness: Defining Maine, runs for 5 sessions, May 29 - July 24, at the State Library in Augusta. Books to be discussed include "The Maine Woods" by Henry David Thoreau.
Bats, May 29
Event - Posted - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

Biologist Trevor Peterson will speak about local species of bats. At Topsham Public Library, May 29, 6 pm. Sponsored by Cathance River Education Alliance.
“Living within Limits” Teen Environmental Poster Contest
Announcement - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

The Teen Library Council of the Patten Library in Bath and Brunswick-based Manomet are sponsoring an environmental poster contest for middle and high school students. Posters should promote actions that help sustain the planet and reduce our environmental footprint. Deadline: June 1.
Sign-Up to Count Fish at Nequasset
Announcement - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

The annual alewife count at the Nequasset Fish Ladder in Woolwich is happening. Join the fun by signing up to count during any two 10 minute blocks within a two hour period.
Wilderness Under Siege, May 30
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Nationally known author and explorer George Wuerthner will discuss the challenges facing Wilderness, how people can better protect the Wildernesses in their backyards and around the country, and organizing against efforts to weaken or repeal the Wilderness Act. At Curtis Library, Brunswick, May 30, 6:30 pm.
Farmer Talent Show & Open Mic, May 27
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

The first annual Farmer Talent Show & Open Mic will benefit the Market’s Harvest Bucks program, which increases access to fruit and vegetables for low-income households. At East Madison Grange, May 27, 5-8 pm.
White Mountains Centennial exhibition, May 27
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

The Museums of the Bethel Historical Society host a preview reception of the new displays, “White Mountain National Forest: A Centennial Exhibition” and “The White Mountains: Alps of New England.” At Robinson House, Bethel, May 27, 2-5 pm.
Field Trip: Capt. Fitzgerald Preserve and Bay Bridge, May 27
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Explore two town-owned properties in Brunswick for breeding and migrant birds: Fitzgerald Preserve and Bay Bridge Wetland Park on the Androscoggin River. May 27, 6:30 – 11 am. Sponsored by Merrymeeting Audubon.
Walk on the Wild Side, May 26
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 19, 2018 

Turner Public Library’s summer programming begins with a nature walk. At Androscoggin Riverlands State Park, May 26, 2 pm.
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News Items
Federal court orders seizure of Nova Star ferry
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, October 31, 2015 

A federal court has ordered the seizure of the Nova Star ferry after a Portland company complained that the ferry operator owes it nearly $200,000. The order, issued Friday in U.S. District Court in Portland, commands the U.S. Marshals Service to “arrest” the ship, which is the formal way of ordering that marshals take possession of the vessel. Such orders are a common way of seizing assets involving ships when creditors claim they are owed money. After two disappointing seasons, the Nova Scotia government announced Thursday it was stripping the operator, Nova Star Cruises, of the franchise to run the heavily subsidized ferry service between Portland and Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.
Column: Tale of two hermits a fascinating subject of debate
Sun Journal - Saturday, October 31, 2015 

Thoreau showed up on my radar when I was a college student probing for the meaning of life. Liberal professors convinced me that, when it came to American thinkers, Henry David walked on water. Fifty years later, I am not so awed by the Hermit of Walden Pond, even if he is the darling of the environmental movement and those bent on civil disobedience. His writing does impress, as well as his knowledge of plants, but he would not have been my choice as a canoe companion for an extended foray into the Maine woods. To be blunt, Thoreau seems to me to have been a foppish, elitist snob, and, in all probability, a bigot. ~ V. Paul Reynolds
Gulf of Maine warming study based on bad science, stakeholders say
Gloucester (MA) Daily Times - Saturday, October 31, 2015 

Fishing stakeholders are less than pleased with the recent study that says increasing water temperatures — along with overfishing — played a significant role in the collapse of the cod stock in the Gulf of Maine. The study, performed by the Gulf of Maine Research Institute and appearing in the journal Science, concluded the Gulf of Maine’s surface water is warming more rapidly than 99.9 percent of the rest of the world’s oceans and that climate change is a contributing factor to the demise of the cod stock. The problem, according to stakeholders, is that the GMRI study arrived at its conclusions using the findings of the very same stock assessment science they consider flawed and inaccurate about the status of New England’s most iconic fish stock.
Maine Dot Confiscates Anti Wind Signs in Moosehead Lake Region
Citizens Task Force on Wind Power - Saturday, October 31, 2015 

Maine DOT employees removed close to 200 yard signs protesting the Sun Edison and Everpower wind projects proposed for the Moosehead region. These signs, which read "Save Moosehead Say No to Wind" were removed from private properties, including business properties. These signs were put up by members and supporters of the Moosehead Region Futures Committee. Is this what America has it come to?
Conservancy buys forest land in Sunkhaze-Bradley corridor
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, October 31, 2015 

More than 12,700 acres of forest land located next to the Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge have been purchased by the The Nature Conservancy in Maine, partly because of a “mid-six-figure range” grant from TD Bank, the group’s acting director said Friday. The sale of the land, which is located to the east of the County Road, closed last week, according to Tom Rumpf, acting director for The Nature Conservancy’s Maine chapter. The property is called the Sunkhaze-Bradley corridor because it connects the U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s Sunkhaze Meadows with 9,277 acres of state preservation lands, called the Bradley unit. Now, it’s the Sunkhaze-Bradley Preserve.
As hunters take to Maine woods this season, more women are joining the ranks
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, October 31, 2015 

When Maine’s firearm season for white-tailed deer opens Saturday, there’s sure to be more female hunters in the field than a decade ago. The percentage of Maine hunting licenses sold to women has grown steadily over the past 10 years, rising from 8.1 percent in 2005 to 12.4 percent in 2014, according to the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. The increase mirrors a national trend that is likely to continue.
Opinion: Press Herald’s stance on local Question 2 ignores flaws in planning process
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, October 31, 2015 

I was very disappointed that the Press Herald is supporting No on 2, that it called the Soul of Portland “off-base” and said it has “spun a false narrative” (“Our Position,” Oct. 27), since nothing is further from the truth. To suggest that supporters of local Question 2 are selfish in their desire to preserve a magnificent public view and ensure responsible future development is ridiculous. Developers’ and city councilors’ positions are far more suspect: They desire free rein to develop property for major profit in a manner that obstructs public views but maintains them for the select few. ~ Dianne Cavanaugh, Portland
Letter: Vote ‘yes’ on Question 2 to keep neighborhood integrity
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, October 31, 2015 

We plan to vote “yes” on Question 2 in Portland. Yes, we think it important to keep the views to Portland Harbor, but we also think it important to rein in some of the proposed zoning changes that have been brought forward by developers the last few years, all over the city, in Bayside, on Munjoy Hill, in Deering Center and in Stroudwater, to name just a few. The purpose of these requests for zone changes is to maximize the return on the developers’ investment, not to improve our neighborhoods, not to improve our public views, not to preserve historic buildings or offer housing that is affordable to the average Portlander. ~ Steven and Donna Williams, Portland
EPA may ban common pesticide used on citrus fruits
Associated Press - Friday, October 30, 2015 

A common pesticide used on citrus fruits, almonds and other crops would be banned under a proposal announced Friday by the Environmental Protection Agency. The proposal would prohibit use of chlorpyrifos, a widely used insecticide that is sprayed on a variety of crops including oranges, apples, cherries, grapes, broccoli and asparagus. The pesticide, in use since 1965, has sickened dozens of farmworkers in recent years. Traces have been found in waterways, threatening fish, and regulators say overuse could make targeted insects immune to the pesticide. U.S. farms use more than 6 million pounds of the chemical each year.
Gorham company targets riverfront land for public access, farmland preservation
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 30, 2015 

Shaw Brothers Construction Inc. of Gorham wants to buy 260 acres of undeveloped land off Route 25 to create public access to the Presumpscot River and return the rest of the property to its former agricultural use. Jon and Dan Shaw, the company’s owners, have offered to buy the Gorham property for $1.6 million from its owner, ecomaine, a trash-disposal agency operated by 20 municipalities in southern Maine. Ecomaine’s board of directors decided Oct. 15 to sell the property on the open market for $1.9 million, giving others the opportunity to bid on the wide swath of land near Mosher Corner that runs from Main Street to the riverbank. If the Shaw brothers succeed in buying the half-wooded parcel, it would be the first venture by the Shaw Brothers Family Foundation, a nonprofit they plan to create with a mission to support agricultural and recreational activities.
Maine business owners explore challenges, opportunities of climate change
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 30, 2015 

Several Maine business owners said Friday that adapting to climate change doesn’t have to be costly and, in many cases, can help a company’s finances as well as the environment. Climate change presents considerable challenges but also potential opportunities to Maine businesses and communities, many of which are witnessing the impacts of a changing ocean environment before their counterparts elsewhere around the country. That was a key theme of a forum co-sponsored Friday by the South Portland Chamber of Commerce and the Natural Resources Council of Maine.
Waterfront developer, neighbors pour money into Portland scenic views referendum
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 30, 2015 

Portland’s referendum to protect scenic views could have citywide implications, but the donations flowing into the “Yes” and “No” campaigns in the final days before Tuesday’s election are coming from those with vested real estate interests around the eastern waterfront. Since Oct. 20, developer CPB2 has contributed an additional $20,000 to a political action group trying to defeat Question 2, which could significantly limit the company’s planned redevelopment of 10 acres of land it owns along upper Fore Street. To date, the developer has invested at least $60,000 to defeat the referendum.
Remains found near AT positively identified as Geraldine Largay
Bangor Daily News - Friday, October 30, 2015 

The Maine office of the chief medical examiner has positively identified the skeletal remains found on Oct. 14 in Redington Township near the Appalachian Trail as Geraldine Largay, the Maine Warden Service announced Friday. The identification of the 66-year-old deceased hiker from Brentwood, Tennessee, was made through DNA analysis, according to Cpl. John MacDonald of the warden service. After examination of the remains and working in conjunction with information from investigators on the case, the chief medical examiner determined Largay’s death was accidental, caused by lack of food and water and environmental exposure.
Geraldine Largay died of exposure on Appalachian Trail, autopsy finds
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 30, 2015 

Appalachian Trail thru-hiker Geraldine Largay died of exposure and lack of food and water, according to an autopsy by the Office of Chief Medical Examiner. The Maine Warden Service announced the results of the state medical examiner’s inquiry, which also used DNA to confirm Largay’s identity. Largay, 66, of Brentwood, Tennessee, failed to arrive at a planned rendezvous with her husband on July 23, 2013, triggering a massive search and an investigation that has remained open for two years. The skeletal remains of Largay were found Oct. 14 in a wooded area about 3,000 yards off the trail, two or three miles from where she was last seen in July 2013, authorities said.
Conservation lawyer Ivy Frignoca named new Casco Baykeeper
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 30, 2015 

A lawyer with a conservation background is the new Casco Baykeeper, the Friends of Casco Bay announced Friday. Ivy Frignoca has experience teaching marine biology and ecology and has most recently worked with the Conservation Law Foundation as the group’s Oceans, Clean Water and Clean Air Advocate throughout New England. Frignoca is only the third baykeeper in the environmental group’s history. Executive director Cathy Ramsdell stepped in on a pro tem basis while the search was on for Payne’s replacement. The search drew 65 applicants.
E2Tech wins award at clean tech gala
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 30, 2015 

E2Tech, a group that tries to build and support companies within Maine’s clean technology and energy sectors, won regional recognition for its efforts on Thursday. The group was named Startup Supporter of the Year at the Green Tie Gala, a Boston trade event for clean energy companies in the Northeast. “This is yet another validation beyond our border that Maine’s alternative energy cluster is one of the fastest growing technology sectors and our startup community is raising awareness of their innovations throughout the region and across the country,” said E2Tech director Jeff Marks.
Know your neighbors: Who is Iberdrola?
Maine Environmental News - Friday, October 30, 2015 

Iberdrola SA is a multinational electric utility company based in Bilbao, Basque Country, Spain. Iberdrola is one of the world’s largest utilities by market capitalization. In the U.S., Iberdrola owns a number of subsidiaries, including Central Maine Power, which supplies electricity to more than 560,000 people in southern and central Maine, and Maine Natural Gas, which serves customers in the Augusta and Brunswick regions. According to The Curant, Iberdrola has had five recent cases of fraud and corruption around the world, with millions of dollars in fines, tens of millions in proposed fines and a worldwide ban on World Bank financing.
Herring fishing to be shut down in Gulf of Maine next month
Associated Press - Friday, October 30, 2015 

Fishery regulators are shutting down herring fishing in the inshore Gulf of Maine because fishermen are approaching their catch limit for the important bait fish. The National Marine Fisheries Service projects more than 90 percent of the catch quota for the area will be harvested by Nov. 2. The inshore Gulf of Maine will close at noon that day and remain shut down until further notice. Atlantic herring fishing is a major industry on the East Coast that accounted for more than $29 million in value and 200 million pounds of fish in 2014. The fish is used as bait for higher-value species such as lobster and also sold commercially as food.
A new species is evolving right before our eyes — an ultra-successful mix of wolves, coyotes and dogs
Other - Friday, October 30, 2015 

A new species combining wolves, coyotes and dogs is evolving before scientists’ eyes in the eastern United States. Wolves faced with a diminishing number of potential mates are lowering their standards and mating with other, similar species, reported The Economist. The interbreeding began up to 200 years ago, as European settlers pushed into southern Ontario and cleared the animal’s habitat for farming and killed a large number of the wolves that lived there. That also allowed coyotes to spread from the prairies, and the white farmers brought dogs into the region. Over time, wolves began mating with their new, genetically similar neighbors. The resulting offspring — which has been called the eastern coyote or, to some, the “coywolf” — now number in the millions.
Maine's Bear Hunt Winding Down With End of Hounding
Associated Press - Friday, October 30, 2015 

Maine's bear hunt is starting to wind down with the end of the season for chasing the big animals with trained dogs. The season for hunting bears with dogs ends on Friday. It is the second-most popular method of hunting bears, after the much more popular use of bait. The baiting season ended on Sept. 26. It's still legal to hunt bears without bait or dogs until Nov. 28. So-called "fair chase" hunting constitutes only a fraction of the bear hunt. Both methods were the subject of a referendum to ban bear hunting with bait, dogs and traps last year. The measure failed. The hunting season began on Aug. 31.
Feds: Maine beats Massachusetts for fisheries landings value
Bangor Daily News - Friday, October 30, 2015 

A 23 percent increase in the value of the country’s 2014 total lobster landings for the first time has made Maine the second most lucrative state for commercial marine fisheries, ranking only behind Alaska, according to federal officials. Maine, where 84 percent of all lobster caught nationwide was brought ashore last year, surpassed Massachusetts with help from a 75-cent increase in the national average price lobstermen earned for their catch, according to an annual report released Thursday by the National Marine Fisheries Service. Overall, the dockside value of all commercial marine species harvested in Maine last year was $547.6 million, while landings in Massachusetts were worth $524.7 million.
Four grandchildren in the same family get deer on Youth Day
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Friday, October 30, 2015 

Jim Robbins of Searsmont and four of his grandchildren experienced an amazing – and unprecedented – day of deer hunting on October 24, Maine’s Youth Deer Hunting Day. “I can’t ever remember our family getting four deer in one day,” Jim told me. “Needless to say I had a bunch of happy grandchildren and parents. It was definitely a great day.”
Baby boomers demand ‘green’ options, even in death
Bangor Daily News - Friday, October 30, 2015 

When it comes to death and burial, coffin-maker Chuck Lakin of Waterville wants you to think outside the box. Or in a box, if you prefer. “You can be buried in cardboard box, a shroud, your favorite sweatpants or nothing at all,” Lakin says. “You’d be surprised at how few rules there are.” Lakin is well known for his do-it-yourself coffin-building demonstrations at the Common Ground Country Fair, where he also speaks about the practices of “natural burial.” He also travels throughout the state speaking, at no charge, to groups. Lakin, who is 70 and retired from his career as a reference librarian at Colby College, gives 30 or 40 presentations per year and the demand keeps rising. He thinks that’s largely because of the aging of the baby boom generation and a growing interest in reclaiming death as a natural transition and an integral part of the human experience.
Maine isn’t doing enough to protect the Gulf from the effects of climate change (Part 6)
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 30, 2015 

When the Maine Legislature’s commission on ocean acidification reported its findings – that the state’s fisheries and aquaculture industries were threatened by this baleful byproduct of global warming – officials here were not exactly spurred to action. Acidification, driven by increased carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and freshwater runoff from extreme rainfall in river basins, has been implicated in failures at oyster hatcheries and mussel farms, and has been shown to weaken clams and other shell-building animals vital to Maine’s fishing and aquaculture industries. But bills introduced in the last session – one each by a Democratic marine scientist and a Republican lobsterman – to implement many of the panel’s findings were withdrawn, one for lack of resources, the other for lack of support from Gov. Paul LePage’s administration.
Letter: Protest will target CO2, not workers at BIW
Portland Press Herald - Friday, October 30, 2015 

A shout-out to all military personnel and workers at Bath Iron Works: This Halloween, at the christening of the new warship, I am not protesting you. I’m protesting the massive carbon dioxide that our military budget pumps into the air and oceans through all that moving around of massive equipment and production thereof, not to mention wars for oil fields. Nothing personal – it’s just that we need to focus our forces on mitigating the CO2 crashing through ocean stocks, etc. Thanks for understanding. ~ Jenny Gray, Wiscasset
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