August 19, 2017  
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Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Bird Monitoring, Aug 26
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 19, 2017 

Join a marsh-wide survey of birds and help document all present species timed to catch the beginning of shorebird migration. At Scarborough Marsh, August 26, 7-10 am, free.
Head Harbor Passage Boat Trip, Aug 26
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 19, 2017 

A birding trip to Head Harbor Passage and the surrounding Canadian Islands. At Eastport, August 26, 10 am – 2 pm; Maine Audubon Members $60, Non-members $75.
Maine Environmental News
Announcement - Friday, August 18, 2017 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to Maine conservation and natural resource news and events. We have posted summaries and links to 50,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Don’t let Trump censor climate science
Action Alert - Friday, August 18, 2017 

President Donald Trump may censor a comprehensive and alarming new report written by scientists from 13 federal agencies — research that confirms climate change is real, it’s caused by human activity and it’s already hurting people across the U.S. We deserve to know the truth about climate change — no matter how inconvenient it may be for Trump’s pro-fossil fuel agenda.
Life Happens Outside Festival, Aug 25-26
Event - Posted - Friday, August 18, 2017 

The Life Happens Outside Festival celebrates Maine's outdoors and its passionate outdoor community. Featuring 6 outdoor villages, 40+ vendors, interactive workshops, exhibits, gear demos, food, and live music. Free giveaways, competitions, outdoor presentations, and the ability to purchase outdoor gear directly from the brands. At Thompson's Point, Portland, August 25-26.
Life Happens Outside Festival, Aug 25-26
Event - Posted - Friday, August 18, 2017 

Celebrate active, outdoor lifestyles. At Thompson's Point, Portland, August 25 & 26. Sponsored by Teens to Trails.
Nature Detectives, Aug 24
Event - Posted - Thursday, August 17, 2017 

Join a scavenger hunt, make your own nature notebook, and learn how to use the tools of the trade. At Scarborough Marsh, Augoust 24, 1–2:30 pm; Maine Audubon Child Members $5, Child Non-members $7, pre-register.
Exploring Nature Through Art, Aug 22
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 15, 2017 

Through various art forms children (age 6-10) will discover some of the secrets of Scarborough Marsh; August 22, 10:30 am – 12 pm; Maine Audubon Child Members $5, Child Non-members $7, pre-register.
Sierra Club Maine Climate Action Conference, Sep 16
Event - Posted - Tuesday, August 15, 2017 

The theme of this year's event is "Maine Community-Based Approaches to a Clean Energy Future and Climate Change Solutions." At University of Southern Maine Lewiston Campus, September 16.
Project WILD Educator Workshop, Aug 21
Event - Posted - Monday, August 14, 2017 

This 6-hour workshop introduces educators to Project WILD materials, activities, and strategies. At Bonny Eagle Middle School, Buxton, August 21, 9 am – 3 pm; Maine Audubon Members $23, Non-members $25.
Kayak Scarborough Marsh, Aug 20
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 13, 2017 

Discover the wildlife and plants of Scarborough Marsh as you paddle the Dunstan River. At Scarborough Marsh, August 20, 1–2:30 pm; Maine Audubon Members $13, Non-members $15, deduct $1.50 if you bring your own kayak, must be 16+.
Exploring Wabanaki/Maine History, Aug 20
Event - Posted - Sunday, August 13, 2017 

Maine-Wabanaki REACH offers an interactive learning experience, "Exploring Wabanaki/Maine History," a participatory presentation for adults and teens. At Reversing Falls Sanctuary, Brooksville, August 20, 4-6 pm.
Native Plants & Wildflower Symposium, Aug 29
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 12, 2017 

Includes talks, tours of two native-plant gardens, and a chance to view an herbarium. At McLaughlin Gardens and Homestead, South Paris, August 29, 8:30 am - 3:30 pm, $20 for members, $30 for non-members, registration deadline Aug 21.
Katahdin Woods & Waters 5k Relay, Aug 19
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 12, 2017 

This race in Katahdin Woods & Waters National Monument is part of the 'Wild Maine Weekend' hosted by local area businesses. August 19.
Animals, Animals, Animals, Aug 19
Event - Posted - Saturday, August 12, 2017 

International wildlife and travel photographer Gary Harmatz will share his photographs and stories of the wonderful world of exotic and highly endangered wildlife. At Blue Hill Public Library, August 19, 10 am.
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News Items
Maine wildlife officials warn of online hunting permit fraud
WCSH-TV6 - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

Maine wildlife officials are asking residents to be aware of phony websites that lure customers into phishing scams with false promises of hunting licenses. The state Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife says residents should make sure they only attempt to buy sporting licenses and registrations from the Maine.gov website.
Minimum size for keeping caught lobster may change south of Cape Cod
Associated Press - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

Southern New England lobster fishermen might have to start throwing back more small lobsters in an attempt to stem population losses. New restrictions are on tap for the region’s historic lobster fishery, which is grappling with an unprecedented decline in some areas. Scientists have said lobsters off southern Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut have declined as ocean waters warm.
Fin-tastic
Bangor Metro - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

It’s a deeply moving experience when a whale surfaces beside your boat and looks you in the eye. You sense the intelligence. You sense the power. Sometimes, you also sense the playfulness. They may leap for no good reason. They may lie on their sides and flap their flippers in the air aimlessly. They may just snooze. I recall a minke whale that swam under our boat repeatedly, surfacing on one side, and then diving just under the keel to resurface on the other. This went on for several minutes. I recall a baby humpback that jumped out of the water 20 times while we watched in awe. For most Americans, this is the stuff of National Geographic magazines. For Mainers, it’s as easy as hopping on a boat and going out to look. You could be aboard one tomorrow.
Ecologist Glen Mittelhauser knows where the wild things are
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

Glen Mittelhauser is one of Maine’s leading naturalists. In the 30 plus years since he arrived in Maine to attend the College of the Atlantic, he’s inventoried Acadia’s plants in a book called “The Plants of Acadia,” the sedges of Maine (flowering plants different from grasses and rushes) in another book and Isle au Haut’s winter population of nesting Harlequin ducks. This August marks the release “The Plants of Baxter State Park,” co-authored with botanist Alison Dibble and six others, which contains the first complete inventory of the park’s 857 types of plants, information gathered over five years.
Bob Lawrence’s wealth of knowledge gives us food for thought
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

Bob Lawrence recently moved to Maine after retiring as the director of the Center for a Livable Future at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. He founded the center in 1996, based on the idea that understanding the relationships among public health, diet, environment and food systems are key to a livable future. The term “retired” is a flexible in his mind. He’ll return to the university in November to teach a course on food systems. He is working with Maine Farmland Trust, which he particularly admires for its work getting young farmers onto land. And he’s part of a group working on trails in the Camden Hills for the Coastal Mountains Land Trust on Wednesday mornings.
Spruce budworm moths blanket New Brunswick town, raising concerns in Maine
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

When budworm moths invaded Maine in the 1970s, they devastated forests. Now a large mass of the insects has descended on a city in New Brunswick in a winged mass so large it was visible on radar, blanketing cars, trees and pavement like some scene from the Bible or a Stephen King novel. Experts in Canada and Maine are trying to figure out what last week’s massive swarm of spruce budworm moths means for the timing of the next anticipated outbreak of a pest that killed millions of acres of Maine forestland several decades ago.
Dancing in the sea, the painter Rachael Eastman connects with the sun
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

She is on the beach at dawn every day, seeking spiritual nourishment and artistic inspiration.
Plans for Round the Mountain Trail emerging
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

The Coastal Mountains Land Trust is closing in on its longtime goal of building a Round the Mountain Trail on Ragged Mountain in Camden. In June, the trust entered into a purchase agreement with Maine Water Company to acquire two easements totaling 1,400 acres. The easements will make possible a 9-mile trail – for use by Nordic skiers, mountain bikers and hikers – that will reach around the mountain. The new trail system will more than double the trails in the region that exist for mountain biking.
Maine Maritime Museum Lobstermobile’s on a roll
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

One ride in the Maine Maritime Museum Lobstermobile, and it becomes obvious. People go nuts for it. The museum, located in Bath, acquired the Lobstermobile from Bar Harbor Seafood, an Orlando-based seafood distributor that also has a small chain of seafood restaurants in Florida. Last year, the museum’s marketing team was looking for a giant fiberglass lobster to showcase its new Maine lobstering exhibit, and luck led to the Lobstermobile.
Column: Use your head and wear a helmet when bicycling
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

While helmets won’t protect cyclists from all injuries, wearing one is the most important way that you can reduce your risk of head injuries from a crash, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety reports that helmet use can lower the risk of head injuries in bicycle crashes by an estimated 50 percent. ~ Shoshana Hoose
Column: History lights the way to Sawyer Mountain
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

History drew me to the Sawyer Mountain Highlands, a small trail network managed by the Francis Small Heritage Trust that straddles the Limerick-Limington town line. In the 1700s, a whale oil light burned at the summit of Sawyer Mountain to direct sailors navigating Portland Harbor. Unlike a traditional lighthouse (which warns sailors away from the rocky coast), the whale oil light on Sawyer’s summit and others like it helped ships in Casco Bay safely bring their boats into harbor. ~ Josh Christie
Editorial: Pipeline politics should remember power users
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

Maine and New England rely on power generated by natural gas, and will for some time to come. It makes sense to do what we can to avoid seasonal shortages that drive up prices. The new pipeline may never materialize even with public help. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court will soon rule on the project backed by Maine regulators and could knock it down. The Maine Public Utilities Commission’s approval comes with the condition that Maine won’t participate unless four other states in the region also agree to take part. But even though high electricity prices might temporarily put environmentalists and polluters on the same side, they are not good for most Mainers. Efforts to increase the gas supply in New England makes sense for Maine.
Letter: Instead of expanding natural gas, we should invest in alternatives
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

Re: Tux Turkel’s piece (“Producers of power fight natural gas expansion,” July 24): The financial analysis was incomplete. Pipeline construction costs will be borne by ratepayers. An opponent was quoted saying “billions of dollars.” Aren’t there more specific estimates available? Whatever the financial costs and benefits, why not prioritize investments in existing emissions-free technologies, such as building efficiency, renewable power (especially solar), energy storage and electric vehicle infrastructure? ~ Daniel Hildreth, Falmouth
Letter: Poland Spring is a proven protector of state resources
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

I’m glad you profiled Poland Spring in your June 26 article. We can all learn a great deal from the 170-year-old Maine company that has grown its business during that time, and done so in a sustainable way. That is why it is unfortunate to see the naysayers, some of whom are front people for an out-of-state group, continue to make their hyperbolic and misleading claims against this longstanding, reputable and very entrepreneurial Maine company. Poland Spring is among the most accountable companies in this great state, especially when it comes to environmental sustainability. ~ Dana Connors, Maine State Chamber of Commerce
Letter: Earth’s future depends on people getting along
Maine Sunday Telegram - Sunday, July 31, 2016 

Recently, violence among humans has shared the headlines with our amazing technological and scientific feat of putting a space vehicle in orbit around Jupiter. Secondary headlines covered our continuing destruction of the environment and our fascination with technological advances aimed at making our lives better. If we continue to destroy each other and the Earth’s environment, moving onto another planet or into a space station may be the only option. Why not say, “Let’s take a break from more innovation and scientific advancement and focus all those brilliant minds and billions of dollars on getting along and living by the Golden Rule”? If we do not give “getting along” a chance, there will be no future. ~ Tom Conger, Industry
Blog: Traffic Noise Drowns Out Thoughtful Debate
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, July 30, 2016 

I’m lobbying for some sort of balance between the natural world and the one we are constantly remaking through our inventions. Growing up on the Maine Coast gave me a keen sense of the environment and the urgent need to protect it. One of the best things we could do, from an environmental standpoint, is to reduce the number of cars. ~ Hank Garfield
Kids keen on backcountry skills have a field day on Swan Island
Kennebec Journal - Saturday, July 30, 2016 

With their families, they flock to try their hands at archery, tracking skills, paddling and more.
Local dairy farm conserves grassland as bobolink habitat
Republican Journal - Saturday, July 30, 2016 

Gold Top farm is run by brothers Mike and Greg Ingraham and their wives Jackie and Shirley, Greg’s son, Isaac and employee, Alex Green. The farm, started in 1876 and now on its fourth generation, is an icon in the town of Knox, and consists of 1,400 acres. The Ingrahams milk 400 cows. In return for an incentive payment to help offset loss in forage quality, the Ingraham family consented to delay mowing on a particularly productive parcel of active bobolink habitat at the end of June. "This was a tremendous conservation effort, and resulted in the fledging of at least 50 bobolink youngsters," the soil districts said. In addition to hosting bobolinks, the fields were also nesting grounds for savannah sparrows and possibly a meadowlark family, the release said.
Rare creatures spotted in Maine
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, July 30, 2016 

Two reports of rare sightings of different creatures in Maine caught my eye feeds Friday morning. One shows a picture of a lobster of a pale blue or whitish hue. The other sighting of a Great Knot bird is an “extremely rare” species, according to the Audubon Society.
Bayer says will halt future U.S. sales of insecticide
Reuters - Saturday, July 30, 2016 

The agricultural unit of German chemicals company Bayer AG will halt future U.S. sales of an insecticide that can be used on more than 200 crops after losing a fight with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Payments to ensure grid reliability will surge
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, July 30, 2016 

The price that electric consumers in Maine and New England pay to make sure there’s enough power to meet future demand will more than double next June and more than triple in June 2018, before easing in 2019.
Letter: National park should be King’s signature project
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, July 30, 2016 

After Angus King left office as Maine’s governor, he and his wife traveled around the country visiting national parks. His writings about his travels reflect his admiration and enthusiasm for our country’s national park system. Because of this, it is hard to understand why the idea of a national monument in northern Maine has not yet earned Sen. King’s enthusiastic support. The sentiment is strongly tilted against Sen. King’s apparent reservations. Sen. King could make this his legacy project, and he should put his full weight behind it. If Angus King wants to be remembered in the vein of Ed Muskie as one of Maine’s great lawmakers, this could be his moment. ~ U. Charles Remmel II, Portland
Letter: LePage wrong about conservation group
Kennebec Journal - Saturday, July 30, 2016 

Last month I attended Gov. Paul LePage’s “town hall” meeting in Richmond. Among other falsehoods, I was told that the Natural Resources Council of Maine will do anything to kill jobs in Maine. Nothing could be further from the truth. I have been a member of the Natural Resources Council of Maine for nearly 30 years because I want to live in a clean and healthy environment. NRCM’s work to clean up our rivers, lakes, streams and coastal waters has added to our economy. If anything, the governor’s attacks on NRCM have strengthened the organization. I sent in a special donation as soon as I learned of the governor’s little “war.” ~ Elizabeth Cuprak, Gardiner
Letter: King must lead on national monument
Bangor Daily News - Saturday, July 30, 2016 

My family owns and runs a small set of cabins in Millinocket that cater to visitors to our region who come to hike, fish, snowmobile, hunt, or just relax and enjoy our beautiful region. Last winter, we went to check out the land that is now proposed to be a national monument. It was beautiful, and I know that our guests would love the opportunity to visit this land. They might stay a couple of extra days to do so. A national monument in the region would help all the businesses where visitors stay, eat and shop in the region. It is past time for Sen. Angus King to provide some leadership and publicly express his support for a national monument. He’s got practically every business in the region in support. What is he waiting for? ~ Skip Mohoff, Millinocket
Trees talk to each other and recognize their offspring
Other - Friday, July 29, 2016 

The Lorax might have spoken for the trees, but it turns out that trees can speak for themselves. At least to other trees, that is. While it's not news that a variety of communication happens between non-human elements of the natural world, the idea of mycelia (the main body of fungi, as opposed to the more well-known fruiting bodies - mushrooms) acting as a sort of old-school planetary internet is still a fairly recent one, and may serve as a spore of a new breed of forestry, ecology, land management.
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