July 16, 2019  
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Maine Environmental News
Action Alert - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond; hey, we're all connected). We have posted summaries and links to 60,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
‘Acadia Files’ author Coppens, Jul 23
Event - Posted - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

Author Katie Coppens will conduct fun science experiments with kids of all ages. At Turner Public Library, July 23, 2 pm. Each volume of “The Acadia Files” helps young readers learn about the scientific method in fun and innovative ways by following the adventures of Acadia, a young scientist.
Help Stamp Money Out of Politics
Action Alert - Monday, July 15, 2019 

The flow of cash into the pockets of politicians from lobbyists, oil and gas companies, and billionaires bent on protecting their wealth is the biggest barrier to our government's taking action on climate change, and it is up to us to put a stop to it. That is why we're asking you to join the movement protesting Big Money's death grip on our future by rubber-stamping our cash with the message "Stamp Money Out of Politics." ~ Ben & Jerry
Tell Your Representative: Invest in Clean Energy and Climate Action
Action Alert - Monday, July 15, 2019 

Congress must update and extend vital tax credits in four key green technology areas needed to meet our climate goals — electric vehicles, offshore wind, electric grid scale storage, and building efficiency. Without these updated credits, clean energy innovation could stall and our planet will be driven even closer to the brink of climate catastrophe. ~ Natural Resources Defense Council Action Fund
Hearing on CMP billing errors, service shortcomings, rate hikes, Jul 22
Action Alert - Monday, July 15, 2019 

Maine Public Utilities Commission public witness hearing concerning Central Maine Power’s request to increase residential rates by over 10%, and CMP billing errors and poor customer service. At PUC, Hallowell, July 22, 6 pm.
Greenhorns summer workshops
Event - Posted - Monday, July 15, 2019 

Hear from historians, restoration ecologists, entomologists, fishermen, foresters and master craftsmen, on a wide range of topics at the intersection of the human and non-human world. Greenhorns, in Pembroke, works to create a welcoming culture for new entrants in sustainable agriculture.
Crystal Spring Farm Bee Tour, Jul 21
Event - Posted - Sunday, July 14, 2019 

Beekeeper Ken Faulkner will explain the importance of honeybees, hive dynamics, beekeeping, honeybee history, and more. At Crystal Spring Farmers’ Market parking area, Brunswick, July 21, 10 am, free. Sponsored by Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust.
Kayak to Woodward Point, Jul 21
Event - Posted - Sunday, July 14, 2019 

Check out newly protected Woodward Point on the New Meadows River in Brunswick from the water. July 21, 2 pm, pre-register. Sponsored by Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust and Maine Coast Heritage Trust.
Climate Convergence Conference, Jul 20
Event - Posted - Saturday, July 13, 2019 

Explore the roots of science denial and change the nature of the public discourse regarding Climate Change. At George Stevens Academy, Blue Hill, July 20.
Loon counters needed, Jul 20
Announcement - Saturday, July 13, 2019 

Each year more than a thousand volunteer counters fan out across Maine’s lakes to help track the status of the state’s loon population. Volunteer counters are needed on a number of Hancock County lakes and ponds, July 20, 7-7:30 am.
Traveling the Northern Forest Canoe Trail, Jul 19
Event - Posted - Friday, July 12, 2019 

Nicole Grohoski, GIS Specialist, Cartographer, and State Representative for District 132 will share adventures from completing the Northern Forest Canoe Trail. At Gordon’s Wharf, Sullivan, July 19, 7 pm. Sponsored by Friends of Taunton Bay and Frenchman Bay Conservancy.
Yoga on the Brunswick Mall, thru Sep 6
Event - Posted - Friday, July 12, 2019 

Classes led by Sundara Yoga’s qualified instructors. At Brunswick Town Mall lawn in front of the gazebo, every Friday (weather permitting), July 19 - September 6, 7:30 – 8:30 am, free.
Hearing on CMP billing errors, service shortcomings, rate hikes, Jul 18
Action Alert - Thursday, July 11, 2019 

Maine Public Utilities Commission public witness hearing concerning Central Maine Power’s request to increase residential rates by over 10%, and CMP billing errors and poor customer service. At UMaine at Farmington, July 18, 6 pm.
Paris to Pittsburgh, Jul 18
Event - Posted - Thursday, July 11, 2019 

This award-winning documentary celebrates how Americans are developing real solutions in the face of climate change. Followed by a panel discussion about climate action in Maine with Kristine Corey, energy efficiency coordinator at AmeriCorps; Stephanie Miles, of Maine Conservation Alliance; and Jill McLaughlin, of ReVision Energy. At First Universalist Church of Auburn, July 18, 5:30 pm.
Forestry for Maine Birds, Jul 17
Event - Posted - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 

Learn how to improve habitat for priority forest birds and a variety of other wildlife species; take care of your woodland; work with other forest management goals; and enhance the value and enjoyment of Maine woodlands. At Mt. Vernon Community Center, July 17, 9:30 am - 2 pm.
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News Items
Maine lawmakers push for federal aid to wild blueberry industry
Associated Press - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

Maine's Congressional delegation is getting involved in a push to extend federal aid to members of the state's wild blueberry industry. Wild blueberries are an important crop in Maine, but the industry has struggled with low prices in recent years. Maine's delegation says the U.S. Department of Agriculture should include the industry in its Market Facilitation Program, which is designed to provide money to agricultural producers affected by trade disruptions. The lawmakers' push follows up on a similar request by Amanda Beal, head of the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry. The lawmakers say many growers are "drastically cutting back" production due to economic pressures.
2,700+ Towers Update Lighting Systems, Saving Migratory Birds And Expenses
American Bird Conservancy - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

Over the past two years, thousands of communications tower operators have updated their lighting systems by turning off steady-burning (L-810) side-marker lights that attract birds and cause millions to die from collisions each year. (Flashing lights remain atop these towers, ensuring aviation safety.) Since 2016, more than 2,700 of about 13,900 tall towers have made this change, stemming from December 2015 guidelines by the Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Communications Commission pertaining to towers over 350 feet in height and their impact on aviation safety and birdlife.
Maine's delegation says the U.S. Department of Agriculture should include the industry in its Market Facilitation Program, which is designed to provide money to agricultural producers affected by trade disruptions. The lawmakers' push follows up on
WMTW-TV8 - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

The Maine Forest Service will release tiny wasps to combat the emerald ash borer in part of the state, officials with the Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry announced Tuesday. The parasitoids, or non-stinging wasps, will feed on or attack the borer's larvae. The emerald ash borer, a destructive beetle that feasts on ash trees, has been found in Aroostook and York counties. Since the beetle showed up in North America, it has killed millions of ash trees.
Column: We must protect the wolves
Washington Post - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

Americans have long had a love-hate relationship with the ancestral predecessor of our favorite family pet. Some want to hunt and kill as many wolves as they can; others want to keep them defended. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services proposes to lift protections. In a 2017 tweet, President Donald Trump referred to trophy hunting as a “horror show.” Trump, who recently touted his administration’s commitment to conservation, could prove it by speaking up for wolves. The essential question comes down to whether we want to ensure that wild areas remain wild, with limited exceptions for ranchers when their livestock is under consistent predation by wolves. Such accommodations would be preferable to rubber-stamping a massive wolf slaughter. ~ Kathleen Parker
How much do you know about Acadia National Park?
Bangor Daily News - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

Acadia National Park is one of the most identifiable places in Maine for those from away, but how much do you really know about the popular landmark? You likely know that it has some good hiking, that tourists flock to it and the nearby town of Bar Harbor and that it has a history of popularity with the elite. But let’s put your knowledge to the test. Try your hand at this week’s quiz and see how well you can answer these questions about Acadia National Park.
76 people died in Acadia National Park
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

Randi Minetor's latest book, Death In Acadia, takes us back into the 1800s. A bunch of deaths occurred when people were swept by huge waves out into the ocean. Many of them ignored danger signs put up by park staff and got way too close to the water. Other people died slipping off cliffs, skating and boating, riding bicycles and snowmobiles and skateboards, and one Park worker was killed by a dynamite blast. Randi reassures us that we can be safe in Acadia. More than 3.5 million people annually visit the park without being harmed. But she also encourages us to stay behind barriers and obey warning signs. “Don’t risk your life for an Instagram photo,” she writes.
The number of days when it feels really hot in Maine will surge by midcentury, a new report says
Bangor Daily News - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

The number of days in Maine when it feels like 90 degrees or hotter outside is expected to increase to 14 days a year by the middle third of this century from a historic average of one, if nothing is done to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new scientific report. That heat index projection, contained in a report released Tuesday by the Union of Concerned Scientists, includes two days in Maine when it will feel like at least 100 degrees Fahrenheit and one day when it will like at least 105.
Study: Without Action, Climate Change Will Bring More Dangerous Heat Days To Maine
Maine Public - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

A new study by the Union of Concerned Scientists finds that without swift action climate change will drive temperatures to dangerous heat levels across the U.S.and Maine in the coming decades. The Union's lead climate analyst, Erika Spanger-Siegfried, says the research used historic data from 1971 to 2000 to make future projections. "With no action by late century, each of Maine's three largest cities would experience more than two weeks worth of days with a heat index above 100 degrees."
Study predicts more ‘extreme heat’ days in Maine as climate warms
Portland Press Herald - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

A new climate report from the Union of Concerned Scientists predicts that Maine could see more than a 10-fold increase in the number of 90-plus degree days by midcentury and up to 11 days by century’s end when temperatures top 100 degrees. The analysis, which is based on historic temperature data and climate models, suggests New Englanders will have to adjust to more frequent occurrences of heat events more typical today of places in the Deep South. The “extreme heat” analysis is just the latest report predicting major impacts on Maine’s commercial fisheries as well as other sectors of Maine’s tourism, agricultural and forestry economies.
Letter: Bees are not pests, but pesticides kill them
Portland Press Herald - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

As Mainers, we must reconcile with the simple conclusion that we are in a state of environmental crisis. Honeybees, a cornerstone of agricultural sustainability, are being threatened by toxic pesticides known as neonicotinoids. This pesticide is typically sprayed by farmers on an industrial scale without regard to its devastating impact on bee populations. Neonicotinoids are unnecessary as there are a variety of alternative pesticides available to farmers that we can and should be using. The solution is simple yet profound: Ban neonicotinoids. ~ Graham Munro-Ludders, Bath
Letter: ‘Greatest Mountain’ doesn’t need to be called ‘Mount’
Portland Press Herald - Tuesday, July 16, 2019 

I would like to commend and second Christopher P. O’Neil’s July 1 letter, “Good editorial – but it’s just ‘Katahdin.’” I quote further from Stephen Clark’s book: “Mount Greatest Mountain – this is not only grammatically incorrect, but a misinterpretation of the Abenaki translation of the mountain’s name. The U.S. Geological Service and other official agencies have failed to recognize this when they slapped a ‘Mount’ on Katahdin many years ago when honoring Indian traditions and language was not considered to be of much value.” The U.S. Board on Geographic Names accepts requests to change the names of geographical features. Feedback from the community, state government and Baxter State Park would be requested. The Abenaki would be consulted. Legislative action as a precursor to a request would be most helpful. It may take a few years so let’s begin. ~ Gary Dick, Scarborough
Officials debate role of Auburn agriculture committee
Sun Journal - Monday, July 15, 2019 

A proposed agriculture committee and its potential authority on land use decisions was the subject of scrutiny during a joint Auburn City Council and Planning Board workshop Monday. The new committee is the result of a long effort to study the city’s agricultural zone and modernize the zoning ordinance, but the decision on how the committee should be framed — and what authority it should have — has been debated for months. A small group of officials recently drafted an ordinance establishing the committee, but during the joint workshop Monday, some disagreed with its scope.
Firefighters quickly put out roof blaze at Old Town mill
Bangor Daily News - Monday, July 15, 2019 

Old Town firefighters quickly put out a roof fire Monday morning on a boiler building at the paper mill, which is in the process of restarting. Chinese paper company Nine Dragons Paper (Holdings) Ltd. purchased the property in 2018. The owner has previously said it plans to have the mill running this summer.
Extra pogy catch could ease bait worries for lobster industry
Portland Press Herald - Monday, July 15, 2019 

Maine unlocked access to more lobster bait Monday with the reopening of the menhaden fishery, easing the lobster industry’s anxiety about a looming bait shortage as peak summer season kicks into high gear. The state ordered its menhaden fleet to stop fishing on June 30 after officials concluded it had exceeded the state’s annual quota of 2.4 million pounds by 1.5 million pounds, the majority of which was landed in the last four days of June. But menhaden, a schooling forage fish also called pogy, were still abundant in Maine waters from Kittery to Penobscot Bay, so Maine sought access to another 4.7 million pounds of quota that is set aside for New England states to share when they catch their limit but the fish remains in large numbers. Last week, regional fishing managers approved Maine’s request.
If a tick bites you in Maine, collect it and send it for testing
Associated Press - Monday, July 15, 2019 

The state of Maine is reminding residents that, if they get bitten by a tick, they can collect the arachnid and send it for testing. The testing can show whether the person bitten by the tick was exposed to tick-borne diseases. The UMaine Cooperative Extension Tick Lab tests for Lyme disease, anaplasmosis and babesia. The tests are $15 per tick for Maine residents. Health care providers reported more than 1,400 confirmed and probable Lyme cases to the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention last year.
Pollinator gardens enhance, beautify Portland’s ecology
Forecaster - Monday, July 15, 2019 

With bee colony collapse, habitat destruction and the spread of invasive species, it’s become the mission of many in Maine to encourage people to think about gardening in new ways that specifically support pollinator health. Among the groups and individuals working to create a landscape where both native plants and pollinators can thrive is the Portland Pollinator Partnership. The group’s mission, she said, is to encourage people to plant pollinator and insect-friendly vegetation, either within their own gardens or in public spots, with the goal of “connecting urban residents with nature on a daily basis.”
Warming Waters
Maine Public - Monday, July 15, 2019 

The impacts of climate change on the Gulf of Maine's ecosystem and people.
Belfast officials get their first tour of proposed land-based fish farm site
Bangor Daily News - Monday, July 15, 2019 

Belfast Planning Board members donned high boots and bug repellant on Wednesday to do a walk-through of the property where Nordic Aquafarms would like to build a land-based salmon farm. The tour took them through boggy fields, into piney woods and across Route 1 to the waterfront property where the company’s intake and outfall pipelines will be built if the project is permitted and moves forward.
Maine forest ranger airlifted to Boston hospital after serious head injury
Bangor Daily News - Monday, July 15, 2019 

A Maine forest ranger was seriously injured Saturday night after an accident in Down East Maine, according to the Maine fire marshal’s office. Ranger Dustin Pickering reportedly jumped off a boat into a lake in Topsfield when his head struck a rock, according to the fire marshal’s office. Pickering suffered several broken vertebrae as a result of that jump, the fire marshal’s office said. Pickering was flown to a hospital in Boston due to the extent of his injuries and is currently in serious condition.
What has to happen before Mainers could get to vote on CMP’s corridor project
Bangor Daily News - Monday, July 15, 2019 

Opponents of Central Maine Power’s unpopular proposal to bring Quebec hydropower to the regional grid through a western Maine transmission line are signaling that they want voters to decide the project’s fate, but their deadline is tight and details are unclear. They have to get more than 63,000 signatures by a January deadline. It’s a response to the utility’s intense and successful lobbying defense of the $1 billion proposal for a 145-mile corridor, which has been opposed by or lost support from 20 towns in a flurry of grassroots opposition. A March poll paid for by the Natural Resources Council of Maine found 65 percent opposition to the project statewide, with that percentage in the upper 80s in Franklin and Somerset counties — the ones most affected by the corridor.
Belfast officials get their first tour of proposed land-based fish farm site
Bangor Daily News - Monday, July 15, 2019 

Belfast Planning Board members donned high boots and bug repellant on Wednesday to do a walk-through of the property where Nordic Aquafarms would like to build a land-based salmon farm. The tour took them through boggy fields, into piney woods and across Route 1 to the waterfront property where the company’s intake and outfall pipelines will be built if the project is permitted and moves forward.
Column: Beware the browntail moth
Morning Sentinel - Monday, July 15, 2019 

How did I spend my first summer vacation? Mixing up equal parts of maximum strength Cortizone-10 ointment, extra strength Benadryl cream, witch hazel liquid and Vicks VapoRub. That’s because I got the dreaded browntail moth rash, this nasty, itchy, bumpy red rash caused by poisonous hairs from the moth caterpillar making a beeline to the sensitive skins of people like me and embedding themselves. ~ Amy Calder
Opinion: Governor Mills defies ‘foolish, unsupported and ill-advised’ regulations on Maine lobster industry
Maine Wire - Monday, July 15, 2019 

In a fiery letter sent Thursday, July 11, Governor Janet Mills announced her opposition to new federal regulations that aim to protect the endangered right whale. I hope the governor will continue to defend Mainers from undue regulation in the future, though for now I’m not holding my breath. ~ William Rolfe
Letter: Pesticides are poisoning our oceans
Portland Press Herald - Monday, July 15, 2019 

Neonicotinoids have become all too prevalent in today’s agricultural practices. Now the most commonly used pesticides, these seven chemicals have been leaking into our oceans and animals. Many farmers are unaware they purchased the poison, since it was applied to seeds long before they reach the fields. Once the seed is a fully grown plant, only 5 percent of the chemical makes its home in the cells of the plant. The other 95 percent disperses into the wider environment, turning into a poison that kills everything from bees to birds to marine life. If these pesticides are allowed to continue devouring our beloved Maine wildlife, we will lose the bees, which pollinate a third of the food we eat, and the rest of our fragile ecosystem. ~ Elizabeth McAleney, Portland
Restoration and improvement work beings at Head Tide Dam
Kennebec Journal - Sunday, July 14, 2019 

Construction has begun on a change to the Head Tide Dam on the Sheepscot River in Alna. A coalition of environmental groups is spearheading a modification of the dam, originally constructed in 1763, to stabilize the structure while creating greater passage for Atlantic salmon and other anadromous species of fish.
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